Avro Shackleton History TV Programme

#1
For those who may be interested there is today a programme " The Avro Shackleton " lasting over an hour concerning the development and history of this aircraft on Channel movie4men starts at 16.15 .
 
#2
Thanks for that, BR. Can't get the channel out here in North Africa, but will try when I get back. I went up in a Shackleton on a Staff College visit to Leuchars (or was it Lossiemouth?) in the 80s. I think that the pilots were the only RAF guys still issued with sheepskin flying jackets, and there were brown leather armchairs in front of the bakelite radar screens. Crawled to the back bubble and tried to imagine the isolation of a Lancaster rear gunner. Great old aircraft!
 
#3
Wasn't there something about the Shack being 10,000 rivets flying in close formation?
Been lucky enough to have been in a ground run one , the noise and vibration, not to mention smell of 4 griffions roaring away ....about as close to a Lanc as I'm likely to get , climbing over that big wing spar makes you realise how hard it would have been to get out of one as it tumbled earthwards .
 
#4
Wasn't there something about the Shack being 10,000 rivets flying in close formation?
Been lucky enough to have been in a ground run one , the noise and vibration, not to mention smell of 4 griffions roaring away ....about as close to a Lanc as I'm likely to get , climbing over that big wing spar makes you realise how hard it would have been to get out of one as it tumbled earthwards .

Last week the programme was about the Mosquito ... only saw 30 mins and it too was excellent .

Is the advantage of contra-rotating propellers on the Griffon increased flying time / range ?

I did not realise how long the Shackleton had been in service ... ~40 years .
 
#6
Contra rotating props were I'm pretty sure just a way of using the power developed by the engines as prop diameter and no of blades was limited, some Seafires used contra props and big Griffon Spits hade five blade props , also if you lost an engine the asymmetrical performance and torque effect was much reduced , I know on a Spit take off requires a good boot of left or right rudder depending on what Mark Spit you happen to be flying ( the Merlin and Griffon rotate in opposite directions )
The Shacks carried out some very long patrols and had big oil tanks for the engines in comparison to the same engine in a Spit
 
#7
Thanks for the feedback gents ... I am old enough to remember the Fairey Gannett which is mentioned in the linky ... I must admit I had thought of problems with a twisting (?) effect of high power prop driven aircraft because of the direction of rotation of the engine / prop made worse because of an engine failure when multi-engine ... every day is a learning day .
 
C

cloudbuster

Guest
#8
Don't forget that Gannet had a pair of engines, the Double Mamba, each driving it's own prop.
 

the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
#9
8 Screws are better than 2 Blow Jobs Shackleton zap sticker at Akrotiri IIRC.
 
#11
Don't forget that Gannet had a pair of engines, the Double Mamba, each driving it's own prop.
Again .... every day is a learning day .
 
#16
For those who missed it the first time the program is repeated at 03-20 this Friday morning on freeview channel 48.
 
#17
Saw them first in 78 up in Lossiemouth, was working in RAF Boulmer in 90 I think when the RAF sent I think 3 aircraft to fly around the UK. Very low and slow around Boulmer.
 
#18
Ah Shackleton's, clapped out abortions with flaps on their wings. That bit of film took me back, swear I could smell the stale beer and farts.



CFB.
 
#19
Bedtime story for you all; I worked on Mk2 & Mk Shacks in the late 1960-early 1970s.

Four Engine's Down...



In the late-1950s the aircrew of a Shackleton Marine Reconnaissance aircraft all boarded their aircraft for the day's trip over the Atlantic, to search for submarines. The Shackleton looked for all the world like a WW2 bomber, but was full of up-to-date search equipment, much of it secret as it took off from RAF St. Mawgan. This was the heavier Mark 3, Phase 3 model, fitted with four Rolls-Royce Griffon, Vee-12 propeller-piston engines (a big version of the famous Merlin) as well as two extra, rather smokey, Viper jet engines fitted in the outer nacels to assist take-off. The aircrew's duty trip was for between eight and ten hours, on a long and very boring sweep of an area of the ocean, flying very low over the sea. As the radar swept back and forth a large 'blip' appeared far ahead so the operator brought this to the attention of the skipper (pilot). Being a young bunch, and having a wicked sense of humour they set off to find this 'blip'. It turned out to be a brand-new US Navy aircraft carrier, full to the brim of then brand-new Phantom fighter-bombers. Being low the carrier's radar had not picked up the Shackleton until it was only a few miles away. The carrier tried to contact it by radio, but failed. Meanwhile the old WW2 bomber, as the carrier crew saw it, slowly turned and lined up to 'approach' the carrier's deck. They then noticed it only had three engines running, but as they watched another one ground to a halt and feathered its propeller. Then a third engine stopped and by now the old bird seemed to be struggling to keep airborne; then the outer engines had thick black smoke billowing out behind them as the fourth and last engine appeared to give up. To the utter amazement of all the carrier crew, the thing kept flying and was approaching their landing deck. This stupid RAF pilot was going to try to land his burning aircraft on them. In utter panic they began to bull-doze the parked Phantom aircraft off the deck and into the sea to make room. As the Shackleton almost seem doomed to drop into the sea just behind the carrier, who was steaming full-ahead into wind for it, the old bird did the impossible, it suddenly began to climb with all four propellers stopped. Then as it climbed up over the top of the huge ship first one, then two, then three and then the forth engine started up again and it roared up and over and away leaving a startled Captain of a USA Navy carrier to explain why he had just dumped six perfectly good Phantom fighter-bombers into the sea.


History does not tell us how this was all covered up!


NC
 

the_boy_syrup

LE
Book Reviewer
#20
Bedtime story for you all; I worked on Mk2 & Mk Shacks in the late 1960-early 1970s.

Four Engine's Down...



In the late-1950s the aircrew of a Shackleton Marine Reconnaissance aircraft all boarded their aircraft for the day's trip over the Atlantic, to search for submarines. The Shackleton looked for all the world like a WW2 bomber, but was full of up-to-date search equipment, much of it secret as it took off from RAF St. Mawgan. This was the heavier Mark 3, Phase 3 model, fitted with four Rolls-Royce Griffon, Vee-12 propeller-piston engines (a big version of the famous Merlin) as well as two extra, rather smokey, Viper jet engines fitted in the outer nacels to assist take-off. The aircrew's duty trip was for between eight and ten hours, on a long and very boring sweep of an area of the ocean, flying very low over the sea. As the radar swept back and forth a large 'blip' appeared far ahead so the operator brought this to the attention of the skipper (pilot). Being a young bunch, and having a wicked sense of humour they set off to find this 'blip'. It turned out to be a brand-new US Navy aircraft carrier, full to the brim of then brand-new Phantom fighter-bombers. Being low the carrier's radar had not picked up the Shackleton until it was only a few miles away. The carrier tried to contact it by radio, but failed. Meanwhile the old WW2 bomber, as the carrier crew saw it, slowly turned and lined up to 'approach' the carrier's deck. They then noticed it only had three engines running, but as they watched another one ground to a halt and feathered its propeller. Then a third engine stopped and by now the old bird seemed to be struggling to keep airborne; then the outer engines had thick black smoke billowing out behind them as the fourth and last engine appeared to give up. To the utter amazement of all the carrier crew, the thing kept flying and was approaching their landing deck. This stupid RAF pilot was going to try to land his burning aircraft on them. In utter panic they began to bull-doze the parked Phantom aircraft off the deck and into the sea to make room. As the Shackleton almost seem doomed to drop into the sea just behind the carrier, who was steaming full-ahead into wind for it, the old bird did the impossible, it suddenly began to climb with all four propellers stopped. Then as it climbed up over the top of the huge ship first one, then two, then three and then the forth engine started up again and it roared up and over and away leaving a startled Captain of a USA Navy carrier to explain why he had just dumped six perfectly good Phantom fighter-bombers into the sea.


History does not tell us how this was all covered up!


NC
I was in a bar in Akrotiri and a mate of mine pointed out a Wing Co and told this tale.
He later asked the Wing Co (who he knew) to confirm it was true.
He comfirmed it was true but put the date later and stated they were droping mail at the time to ships sailing about. (RN & USN)
As they flew over and down the side of the carrier they did see aircraft going for a swim.
Not the happiest de brief when they got home.
 

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