Avionics or land systems

#2
Watt is the better side of the electronics trade avionics or land systems?
Less than helpful, agreed, but it amused little, bored old me.

In terms of 2nd career, the avionics' trade is arguably more lucrative.
 
#4
No one remains in the mob for ever. In any event there is convergence of NavAids and the overarching legislation - which minimises the differences. Failing that, there's working for a foreign govt - which is lucrative, if you can stomach the conditions.
 
#6
Land
 
#9
Yeah by land I mean ECE. Any positives or negatives from either side would be good as in finding very little information on the two. Things like difference in posting and what jobs are out there for either when civvie street finally calls.
 
#10
Air trades are generally thought of as being the geekier of the two and have little experience of the wider Army and of soldiering in general.

If you think that a tough exercise is spent in a tent on the far side of the airfield or a bad day on tour is when the Costa runs out of iced coffee go light blue!

If you get excited by filling out paperwork and having multiple people counter-sign for your work and tool control fills your head with wonder, Smurf is for you again!

If you are interested in learning aspects of what other trades do and becoming a Jack of all military engineering aspects, steam power is the way forward. Likewise if you want a chance to do real soldiering and learn and practise proper infantry skills on ops.

The main choice is between working conditions. Light blue get all the correct tools and equipment to do the job properly, Steam REME rely on a Leatherman and a headtorch to get things moving again.
 
#12
air trades are generally thought of as being the geekier of the two and have little experience of the wider army and of soldiering in general.

If you think that a tough exercise is spent in a tent on the far side of the airfield or a bad day on tour is when the costa runs out of iced coffee go light blue!

If you get excited by filling out paperwork and having multiple people counter-sign for your work and tool control fills your head with wonder, smurf is for you again!

If you are interested in learning aspects of what other trades do and becoming a jack of all military engineering aspects, steam power is the way forward. Likewise if you want a chance to do real soldiering and learn and practise proper infantry skills on ops.

The main choice is between working conditions. Light blue get all the correct tools and equipment to do the job properly, steam reme rely on a leatherman and a headtorch to get things moving again.

yaaawwwwwwnnnnn!
 
#13
My personal experience is that Land has more varied postings and works on a wider range of kit, personally I've worked on Rapier, AMETS (yes, I'm that old...), 2nd line ATE systems (Rapier ERV, and GPATE), taken part in into service trials, had input into new test packages involving working with Racal engineers at Slough (long gone now! Another anecdote, the production boss at slough was an ex-RMP who re-badged to REME as a Tels Tech). Recently met a Land tech working at Wimbish on the EOD robot, we had a nice chat about robotics as that's now the line of work that I'm in.

Post career choices depend on experience, your choice of resettlement and sheer hard work of writing huge number of letters.

Avionics - you work on some very Gucci kit, generally in fairly nice environments, but the range of kit is fairly limited.

Both tech trades are now (IMHO) starting to suffer from the box-change approach. It's obviously a good move for the military as a hole because it's quicker (reduced MTTR), meaning that kit is more available. But it doesn't help to promote good tech experience in the long run.
 
#15
It's a bit of kit that went out of service about 18 years ago


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#16
Both tech trades are now (IMHO) starting to suffer from the box-change approach.......... it doesn't help to promote good tech experience in the long run.
I think that the rot of box changing started back in the 70s with Rapier and it's sister nightmare the FRTV. It didn't do much for technical experience or morale that long ago either.
 
#18
Urm, not really Gary. It just depends what your interested in? Would you rather work on a tank or a helicopter?
 
#19
It's a bit of kit that went out of service about 18 years ago


Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
Aye, it was a real antique. FACE computer (box about 4ftx2.5ftx1ft with less computing power than a commodore 64) running a radar to track weather balloons. A trailer to produce hydrogen gas from Methanol. It was great fun! Real knife and fork electronics. We also had to play with PADS as well.
 
#20
I think that the rot of box changing started back in the 70s with Rapier and it's sister nightmare the FRTV. It didn't do much for technical experience or morale that long ago either.
The B1, B2, and tracked rapiers weren't too bad in that respect (I'm not old enough for the A series ones!), there was still a lot of 'real' electronics, following signals through the system. I didn't play with FRTV, but did a lot of work on the 551 ERV, which was it's big brother. That was very much real electronics. If there was a problem with a test that could involve the ATE it meant creating a 'latch-and-patch' diagram, going through the code and working out how it was all connected to try and track down the fault. Great fun and a big learning experience.
 

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