Avian flu found in parrot in UK

#1
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4365956.stm

A parrot that died in quarantine in the UK has tested positive for avian flu, the government has said.
A highly pathogenic H5 strain of the disease has been found, but it is not known if it is the H5N1 variant which has killed at least 60 people in Asia.

Because the bird - imported from south America - was in quarantine, the UK's disease-free status is not affected.

Meanwhile, poultry imports from Croatia are being banned by the EU after the virus was found in six swans there.
Just one question? What migrates to South America from SE Asia? Is there some mutant strain of Condor we haven't seen yet?
 
#4
Ahhhhhh thankee NWD , makes more sense now.
 
#6
"Polly wants a cra...........sh team"
 
#8
"No no he's not dead, he's, he's restin'! Remarkable bird, the Norwegian Blue, idn'it, ay? Beautiful plumage!"
 
#10
As usual I had a couple of farmers in my bar last night. One is a chicken farmer (of the type that are crammed into sheds for 40 days then killed and taste of nothing) and the other one has some cattle.

Went home for my supper and came in about 10:30 after watching the news and told the chicken farmer that there was a reported case in a parrot. "Great" he said "Compensation ! Here it comes"

Meanwhile, old cattle farmer says "Great. Everyone will eat beef and lamb and that'll push prices up"

Stinks of F&M to me and off I go to www.fwi.co.uk to voice my opinions again.
 
#13
This parrot has ceased to be, it is an ex-parrot.
 
#15
There is no point on getting overexcited.

The virus would have to mutate into a form transmissable to humans. This is possible but certainly not inevitable.

There is no point in worrying until if and when that happens, as any immunisation treatment would have to be derived from the mutated virus.

The only practical steps that can be taken are import, poultry and travel contols and the stockpiling of general-purpose anti-viral drugs.
 
#17
Well Peeps,

There are several issues here, and at least two stories getting mixed up.

The two, possibly three stories are,

1. The seasonal flu outbreak that this country sees every year

2. The story about it is time for another world flu pandemic.

3. The story about the possibility of the lethal bird flu virus crossing species.


The first point is valid; we do have every year death caused by the influenza virus. I do not have statistics to hand but I believe the number of deaths is relatively static, though this may increase with the increase in heating fuel bills, the poorer unable to pay for the heating. Often it is the poorer that are more susceptible to the flu virus.

The last major world flu pandemic was in the 50’s (1958?) Again, there is speculation that we are due for another pandemic. The flu pandemic of 1918/1919 killed more than that died in combat during the course of world war one.

There have been several cases of humans falling ill caused by this avian influenza virus, all of which lived in close proximity to the birds that they reared for farming purposes. But for the virus to successfully cross species, the virus has to be able to successfully pass from one human to another. This will require genetic changes (mutation) of the virus to be able to spread from one person to another. Whilst this is possible, is likely to require a period of time for this to happen; though it is biologically possible (e.g. it is thought that HIV crossed species from Simian Immunodefiency virus). There is yet no biological evidence to suggest that this has yet happened. Should the avian flu virus mutate to propagate in humans, this would likely cause a pandemic.

The fact that two parrots died in quarantine shows that we do have safeguards in place that are currently working. The number of known cases of avian flu virus in birds is small in Europe at the moment, and why it is of concern, not drastic bad news at the moment. Over the next ten years or so, Europe and the UK in particular are more likely to see the spread of avian flu spread, not by human trafficking, but the natural spread of a disease as in a human population.

Birds will over a period of time learn to control the virus, and the threat will die down.

In my opinion, the current threat to society is not the virus but rather the poor, sensualisation reporting by the media who are looking for a story, where, frankly there isn’t one.

It is worrying that there were two deaths of birds whilst in quarantine. But on both on the BBC and sky news this morning, they were looking for a story, on BBC, they interviewed several renowned experts in the field, and despite the leading questions being asked by the BBC journalists, they were very positive, that there is a threat, but at the moment, the systems we have in place are adequate.

Lets have some sensible journalism please

Jennie
 
#18
Jennie said:
Well Peeps,

There are several issues here, and at least two stories getting mixed up.

The two, possibly three stories are,

1. The seasonal flu outbreak that this country sees every year

2. The story about it is time for another world flu pandemic.

3. The story about the possibility of the lethal bird flu virus crossing species.


The first point is valid; we do have every year death caused by the influenza virus. I do not have statistics to hand but I believe the number of deaths is relatively static, though this may increase with the increase in heating fuel bills, the poorer unable to pay for the heating. Often it is the poorer that are more susceptible to the flu virus.

The last major world flu pandemic was in the 50’s (1958?) Again, there is speculation that we are due for another pandemic. The flu pandemic of 1918/1919 killed more than that died in combat during the course of world war one.

There have been several cases of humans falling ill caused by this avian influenza virus, all of which lived in close proximity to the birds that they reared for farming purposes. But for the virus to successfully cross species, the virus has to be able to successfully pass from one human to another. This will require genetic changes (mutation) of the virus to be able to spread from one person to another. Whilst this is possible, is likely to require a period of time for this to happen; though it is biologically possible (e.g. it is thought that HIV crossed species from Simian Immunodefiency virus). There is yet no biological evidence to suggest that this has yet happened. Should the avian flu virus mutate to propagate in humans, this would likely cause a pandemic.

The fact that two parrots died in quarantine shows that we do have safeguards in place that are currently working. The number of known cases of avian flu virus in birds is small in Europe at the moment, and why it is of concern, not drastic bad news at the moment. Over the next ten years or so, Europe and the UK in particular are more likely to see the spread of avian flu spread, not by human trafficking, but the natural spread of a disease as in a human population.

Birds will over a period of time learn to control the virus, and the threat will die down.

In my opinion, the current threat to society is not the virus but rather the poor, sensualisation reporting by the media who are looking for a story, where, frankly there isn’t one.

It is worrying that there were two deaths of birds whilst in quarantine. But on both on the BBC and sky news this morning, they were looking for a story, on BBC, they interviewed several renowned experts in the field, and despite the leading questions being asked by the BBC journalists, they were very positive, that there is a threat, but at the moment, the systems we have in place are adequate.

Lets have some sensible journalism please

Jennie
Good points... This is an ex-parrot! Call me when the next scare comes along! :wink:
 
#19
Jennie said:
Well Peeps,

There are several issues here, and at least two stories getting mixed up.

The two, possibly three stories are,

1. The seasonal flu outbreak that this country sees every year

2. The story about it is time for another world flu pandemic.

3. The story about the possibility of the lethal bird flu virus crossing species.


The first point is valid; we do have every year death caused by the influenza virus. I do not have statistics to hand but I believe the number of deaths is relatively static, though this may increase with the increase in heating fuel bills, the poorer unable to pay for the heating. Often it is the poorer that are more susceptible to the flu virus.

The last major world flu pandemic was in the 50’s (1958?) Again, there is speculation that we are due for another pandemic. The flu pandemic of 1918/1919 killed more than that died in combat during the course of world war one.

There have been several cases of humans falling ill caused by this avian influenza virus, all of which lived in close proximity to the birds that they reared for farming purposes. But for the virus to successfully cross species, the virus has to be able to successfully pass from one human to another. This will require genetic changes (mutation) of the virus to be able to spread from one person to another. Whilst this is possible, is likely to require a period of time for this to happen; though it is biologically possible (e.g. it is thought that HIV crossed species from Simian Immunodefiency virus). There is yet no biological evidence to suggest that this has yet happened. Should the avian flu virus mutate to propagate in humans, this would likely cause a pandemic.

The fact that two parrots died in quarantine shows that we do have safeguards in place that are currently working. The number of known cases of avian flu virus in birds is small in Europe at the moment, and why it is of concern, not drastic bad news at the moment. Over the next ten years or so, Europe and the UK in particular are more likely to see the spread of avian flu spread, not by human trafficking, but the natural spread of a disease as in a human population.

Birds will over a period of time learn to control the virus, and the threat will die down.

In my opinion, the current threat to society is not the virus but rather the poor, sensualisation reporting by the media who are looking for a story, where, frankly there isn’t one.

It is worrying that there were two deaths of birds whilst in quarantine. But on both on the BBC and sky news this morning, they were looking for a story, on BBC, they interviewed several renowned experts in the field, and despite the leading questions being asked by the BBC journalists, they were very positive, that there is a threat, but at the moment, the systems we have in place are adequate.

Lets have some sensible journalism please

Jennie
THANK-YOU!!!
 

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