Australia: if the beer doesn't get you, the wildlife will.

#1
But we've all seen Skippy; kangaroos are so cute and cuddly.

'A kangaroo has attacked three people on the southern Darling Downs, leaving one of them with a “significant” chest injury.'

Three injured in kangaroo attack
 
#4
“It is not known what the trio were doing at the time of the attack.”

Trying to protect themselves?

As an afterthought, what made the kangaroo so jumpy?

TAXI!
 
#5
 
#7
One of my former workmates was seconded to our Oz division (mining & minerals).
His missus hated the wildlife, especially Cane Toads after she stood on one in the dark.
Could not get back to the UK fast enough.
 
#8
One of my former workmates was seconded to our Oz division (mining & minerals).
His missus hated the wildlife, especially Cane Toads after she stood on one in the dark.
Could not get back to the UK fast enough.
Those toads will gang up on one. ;-) They can be especially bullying to weak sisters.

Toad hitching a ride with text in box.jpg
 
#9
Australia is home to the two most venomous snakes in the world, in ascending order the Eastern Brown and the Fierce, or Small Scaled Snake. But these will mostly only bite you if you step on them; it's a matter of looking where you are going. How would you like it if I stepped on you?

I have had a couple of encounters with Eastern Browns and one possible encounter with a Small Scaled Snake, all of which were closer encounters than I would have liked, but, touch wood, I have never been bitten. I don't handle snakes for a living; these encounters were just part of living and working out here.

However the UK, I've heard, is home to a species of two-legged vermin known as Chavs and Chavettes. These don't have fangs but some of them at least have knives. I'd rather our wildlife any day.

As for the Cane Toad, as this page, Invasion of the Cane Toad will show, they were part of what seemed a good idea at the time, but which turned out to be an ecological disaster. It's not the first time such things have happened, and it unfortunately probably won't be the last, but, as other topics on that site will show, they are trying very hard to do something about it.
 
#10
Australia is home to the two most venomous snakes in the world, in ascending order the Eastern Brown and the Fierce, or Small Scaled Snake. But these will mostly only bite you if you step on them; it's a matter of looking where you are going. How would you like it if I stepped on you?

I have had a couple of encounters with Eastern Browns and one possible encounter with a Small Scaled Snake, all of which were closer encounters than I would have liked, but, touch wood, I have never been bitten. I don't handle snakes for a living; these encounters were just part of living and working out here.

However the UK, I've heard, is home to a species of two-legged vermin known as Chavs and Chavettes. These don't have fangs but some of them at least have knives. I'd rather our wildlife any day.

As for the Cane Toad, as this page, Invasion of the Cane Toad will show, they were part of what seemed a good idea at the time, but which turned out to be an ecological disaster. It's not the first time such things have happened, and it unfortunately probably won't be the last, but, as other topics on that site will show, they are trying very hard to do something about it.
Is there anything in OZ which isn't actively trying to kill you?

 
#13
Email from a friend in Oz this week:

'Riding along with one other on a country road and he was in front of me. Next thing I knew I let out an agonizing groan and was heading towards the bitumen. Apparently I was crash tackled by a kangaroo. Broke the right scapula, #2 rib, bruised a few more ribs and lots of soft tissue damage to the shoulder in general. A week in hospital and another week at home.'
 
#14
Email from a friend in Oz this week:

'Riding along with one other on a country road and he was in front of me. Next thing I knew I let out an agonizing groan and was heading towards the bitumen. Apparently I was crash tackled by a kangaroo. Broke the right scapula, #2 rib, bruised a few more ribs and lots of soft tissue damage to the shoulder in general. A week in hospital and another week at home.'
How was the 'roo?
 
#15
Email from a friend in Oz this week:

'Riding along with one other on a country road and he was in front of me. Next thing I knew I let out an agonizing groan and was heading towards the bitumen. Apparently I was crash tackled by a kangaroo. Broke the right scapula, #2 rib, bruised a few more ribs and lots of soft tissue damage to the shoulder in general. A week in hospital and another week at home.'
Even kangaroos can't stand lycra clad pedalling mentalists.
 
#17
Roos and Wombats can both write off a car, as Roos can get up to six feet tall hitting on of them at speed will smash in the front of the car and in some cases, especially low vehicles, end up in the front seat with you. Wombats are solid and can crack an axle or smash a sump when hit.

White tail spiders will cause your skin to die, red tail spiders will give you intense pain, and huntsmen spiders give you a heart attack when they suddenly appear in front of you....

The only thing that won't kill you are some of the sheep.....
 
#20
Australia is home to the two most venomous snakes in the world, in ascending order the Eastern Brown and the Fierce, or Small Scaled Snake. But these will mostly only bite you if you step on them; it's a matter of looking where you are going. How would you like it if I stepped on you?

I have had a couple of encounters with Eastern Browns and one possible encounter with a Small Scaled Snake, all of which were closer encounters than I would have liked, but, touch wood, I have never been bitten. I don't handle snakes for a living; these encounters were just part of living and working out here.

However the UK, I've heard, is home to a species of two-legged vermin known as Chavs and Chavettes. These don't have fangs but some of them at least have knives. I'd rather our wildlife any day.

As for the Cane Toad, as this page, Invasion of the Cane Toad will show, they were part of what seemed a good idea at the time, but which turned out to be an ecological disaster. It's not the first time such things have happened, and it unfortunately probably won't be the last, but, as other topics on that site will show, they are trying very hard to do something about it.
The worst thing about our wild chavs are their protected status. They are part of a state funded breeding programme, have lots of rights, and the weight of the law is upon you if you defend yourself against their attacks. At least you can squash a spider....
 

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