Aussie nurses raped before being massacred by Japanese

#62
It’s interesting how a lot of WW2 veterans have absolute lifelong hatred for the Japanese but managed to quickly reconcile with the Germans.

My father in law landed with the ERY on D Day, fought through to Berlin, wounded at Caen, quick detour via Belsen to witness the horrors of the holocaust.

Never set foot in the Far East.

By the 50s he was skiing in Germany and Austria every winter, had German friends, drove BMWs for most of his life.

By comparison, absolutely hated anything Japanese. Seriously protested when my missus moved out there in the early 00s to work as an English teacher.

Similar story with my great uncle. Merville Battery veteran. Ended up becoming good friends with the German officer in charge of the battery after the war. Hated anything Japanese.

Were they really that much worse than the Nazis?

My Grandfather used to actually say the same thing he used to say the Germans he met were unrepentant about what they had done yet everyone seemed to be falling over themselves post war to be their mates.

Strangely he hates the Italians more than anything

He lost his younger brother to the Japanese
We have the CWGC certificate telling us he died in Changi we don't know how
Granda went all over Scotland after war trying to find out what happened but never did find him.
I know he felt bad about it because family hearsay says that him and another brother tried to drag the younger brother off the troop train and they were going to hide him but he wouldn't come off.
I remember once when drink had been taken him saying he just walked down the gang plank virtually straight into those bastards

Mr Sharp who lived below us had been a FEPOW
You were told never to refuse food if he offered it to you.
He would buy a Mars Bar and slice it with his pocket knife and share it between about 10 kids.
I can remember the sheer delight on his face as he slipped a wafer thin piece if Mars onto his tounge and just savoured it

I learnt early on if they were going for a walk it was time to make excuses
He hates being cooped up and would walk for miles
 
#63
There was the sweetest old lady (well I say she was old, she was old to me, in hindsight she might well have only been in her 50s) living in our street when I was a kid, a really lovely gentle lady who lodged with a neighbour. Every afternoon you would see her out walking her spaniel, she would always give us kids the brightest of smiles and a cheery wave, as nice a lady as you could ever hope to meet.

It was only years later that I learned she had been in Malaya when it fell, her husband was captured and never seen again, she herself escaped in a plane with her baby in her arms. The plane was strafed by a Japanese fighter and the baby was killed (God alone knows what the baby must have looked like after been hit by a machine gun bullet).

I never knew any of this, I just knew her as a lovely old lady. It just makes you think about the millions of people across the UK who survived the war but who surely must have been nursing horrific memories all the time they were living among us, as we grew up blissfully unaware.
 
#64
The imperial Japanese regime made the Nazis look the height of rational and disciplined behavior! . Junior officers shouldn't get to start wars or assinate senior officers they disagree with. Rival services shouldn't try to assinate one another.
Medical services shouldn't be replaced by beatings as failure to die or sickness is obviously an insult to the emperor they took Bushido and swallowed the cool aid completely and asked for more!
Conscripts were seen as completely disposable.
After the war macarthur drew a veil over the whole thing Japanese basically get taught wars bad then hiroshima!
Every so often the barking end of jap politics tries to imply they weren't so bad and discovers the rest of Asia violently disagrees.
 
#65
A family friend, now long dead, was captured in Malaya and spent the next three years on the Burma Railway. He was a Royal Signals officer and quite technically minded. He managed to build a radio from bits that he had scavenged and kept the other inmates up to date with news. God knows what would have happened to him if he'd been caught. He never really spoke about his time as a POW but the hatred was there. In pride of place in the sitting room was a leather bound photo frame, which he took great pleasure in telling guests was made from Jap skin.
 
#66
I’ve just googled Unit 731. Grim doesn’t come close.
Not a very pleasant nation. In some quarters they still worship the battleship Yamato as a deity today.
 
#67
Nobody of that generation who had any experience of the Japanese would be surprised by this. It was part and parcel of their horrific code of conduct towards all non-Japanese. My father rarely spoke of his war service in India and Burma but assured me that the Japanese were vermin - and he would, probably, hold that view today if still around.
My father was of the opinion that Hiroshima and Nagasaki were the best things that happened to Japan.
 
#68
It worked both ways, the death rate of germen prisoners captured by the red army after the battle of Stalingrad, was 94%.

Nope,

Nearly all the POWs who fell into soviet hands after Stalingrad surrendered were already severely malnourished, sick, and suffering from the extreme cold. They were very literally dead men walking as they walked into captivity.

In the normal run of things, a German POW in soviet hands had a reasonable expectation of survival, was fed and paid for his work.
The Russians were a funny lot and quite scrupulous working hours, 8 per day, and pay.
They released most of their POWs by 1946, much quicker than us, p as they found the Germans bloody lazy and unproductive.
 
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#69
Re German POWs in Russian hands.

If you were SS, your expectation of survival was very low, after finding the SS’s handiwork in Operation Typhoon, (top tip, don’t massacre a million civilians if you are go to be retreating), the Russians generally shot any SS they captured out of hand.

Heer? Prisoners were taken freely, and they were not subjected to any systematic murder regime. Work was hard, but no harder than the Russians themselves were doing.
.
Yes, the death rates were higher in Soviet hands, but a fair bit if that is simply the very harsh climate, coupled with the often poor health of Germans when taken as POWs.

If you want a bit of WTF! Consider the very high death rates amongst German POWs in French hands in 1944/45, so high, Eisenhower eventually expressly forbid American units handing over any Germans into French custody.
As an example?
The French were Demining France by simply ordering large numbers of POWs to go into mined areas at gunpoint and find the mines by hand, some estimated suggest 50,000 were killed in the process.
 
#70
Nope,

Nearly all the POWs who fell into soviet hands after Stalingrad surrendered were already severely malnourished, sick, and suffering from the extreme cold. They were very literally dead men walking as they walked into captivity.

In the normal run of things, a German POW in soviet hands had a reasonable expectation of survival, was fed and paid for his work.
The Russians were a funny lot and quite scrupulous working hours, 8 per day, and pay.
They released most of their POWs by 1946, much quicker than us, p as they found the Germans bloody lazy and unproductive.

Don't know where you get your information from, the Soviets kept German POW well into the 50`s

The last larger group of PAW (about 10.000 people) were set free in 1955–56, after Konrad Adenauer, the German chancellor of that time, paid in Sept. 1955 a visit to the Soviet Union to establish diplomatic relations.



Archie
 
#71
It worked both ways, the death rate of germen prisoners captured by the red army after the battle of Stalingrad, was 94%.
According to Beevors Stalingrad book, I believe that it was due to an outbreak of disease rather than deliberate efforts to kill off the 6th Army PoWs.

Awful, but unintended it seems
 
#72
According to Beevors Stalingrad book, I believe that it was due to an outbreak of disease rather than deliberate efforts to kill off the 6th Army PoWs.

Awful, but unintended it seems
And the fact that it was the middle of winter and they were already on the brink of starvation.
 
#73
And the fact that it was the middle of winter and they were already on the brink of starvation.
Indeed. Emaciated, lice ridden, cold, malnourished and immune system on its chin strap. Wouldn't take much to kill off men in that condition, young though they were
 
#76
Don't know where you get your information from, the Soviets kept German POW well into the 50`s

The last larger group of PAW (about 10.000 people) were set free in 1955–56, after Konrad Adenauer, the German chancellor of that time, paid in Sept. 1955 a visit to the Soviet Union to establish diplomatic relations.



Archie
 
#77
Interesting how old they all look. Not one looked under 45, yet this is only 11 years after the war.

Captivity must've been hard
 
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ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
#79
Were they really that much worse than the Nazis?
Personally I reckon they were and as said by someone that gene is still in them.
 
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