Aussie nurses raped before being massacred by Japanese

Except, as was proven on Okinawa, they weren’t absolute fanatics when safe conduct passes were dropped and troops ordered to recognise them.
Bill Slim would disagree with that view.
 
And yet, from that very article,


We'll assume the 13 signatories weren't identified either.
They had form.

Years after the end of World War II, the bodies of Japanese soldiers who had died in the Mariana Islands were repatriated to their homeland for proper burial.

More than half of the bodies returned home were returned without their heads.

The heads, it turned out, had been taken by the American soldiers responsible for the deaths, and kept as gruesome war trophies.


Skulls, Ears, Noses, And Other Morbid "Trophies" Americans Took From Dead Japanese In WWII
 
The Japanese-American Nisei interpreters were often successful in encouraging surrender, often at great risk to themselves.
The American ethos of 'no prisoners' back-fired in a couple of ways


I certainly don't condemn the Americans for that-total war should be expected; but I'm no fan of excuses being trotted out for such behaviour.
you ever been in a actual war where you could take a prisoner?


It wasnt an ethos of no prisoners it was from bitter experience of false surrenders to draw allied forces into ambush

The Goettge patrol at Guadalcanal was massacred when it landed to supposedly take starving Japs prisoner and it was an ambush

it doesn't take too many such incidents before you dont trust the phuckers when they come out hands up and a frag in their trousers or setting you up for a Nambu machinegun target.

a PT Boat crewman giving a drink of water to jap sailors rescued from the water from a destroyer sunk off New Georgia when the jap grabbed his pistol and shot the US sailor to death and the jap monkey was immediately shot to death by the other PT crewmen

US Navy Airman Bruno Gaido a hero at the Coral Sea was captured at Midway with his pilot, tortured and chained to drums filled with scrap and dumped overboard whilst alive

Why the Phuck would ANYONE bother to take chances with such pricks?
 


It wasnt an ethos of no prisoners it was from bitter experience of false surrenders to draw allied forces into ambush
So you deny there was an ethos of no prisoners yet you spend the next few paragraphs explaining why there was?
I guess we have different definitions of what the word ethos means.
 
So you deny there was an ethos of no prisoners yet you spend the next few paragraphs explaining why there was?
I guess we have different definitions of what the word ethos means.
My god but your thick as shit
 
So you deny there was an ethos of no prisoners yet you spend the next few paragraphs explaining why there was?
I guess we have different definitions of what the word ethos means.


The thread is drifting so let us not forget Europe and Patton with his inferred 'no prisoners' stance. History and war trials fall to the victors. I'm just glad I never had to face either theatre of war. The NAAFI in Krefeld on a Friday night was bad enough.
 
View attachment 389541

1,700 Americans and 4,700 Japanese KIA in a few days fighting.
Actually just under 1000 Americans killed, but doesn’t alter the main point.

Tarawa was the first battle where the Americans realised just how tough the Island Campaign was going to be.

There is also a famous clip of a senior American officer giving the Tarawa pre-battle briefing to his men where he effectively tells them not to take prisoners.
 
Actually just under 1000 Americans killed, but doesn’t alter the main point.

Tarawa was the first battle where the Americans realised just how tough the Island Campaign was going to be.

There is also a famous clip of a senior American officer giving the Tarawa pre-battle briefing to his men where he effectively tells them not to take prisoners.
I recall reading an account of a Pacific island (cant remember the name) invaded by thousands of American and Canadian troops. At the end of the day, about 100 of them were dead. But military historians and experts the world over have agreed that there would have been many more deaths on both sides, if the island had any Japanese soldiers on it.
 
I recall reading an account of a Pacific island (cant remember the name) invaded by thousands of American and Canadian troops. At the end of the day, about 100 of them were dead. But military historians and experts the world over have agreed that there would have been many more deaths on both sides, if the island had any Japanese soldiers on it.
I wanted to give a funny but the Americans (with all due respect) do have a little form.
 
They had form.

Years after the end of World War II, the bodies of Japanese soldiers who had died in the Mariana Islands were repatriated to their homeland for proper burial.

More than half of the bodies returned home were returned without their heads.

The heads, it turned out, had been taken by the American soldiers responsible for the deaths, and kept as gruesome war trophies.

Skulls, Ears, Noses, And Other Morbid "Trophies" Americans Took From Dead Japanese In WWII
I don't doubt that they had form.
 
I recall reading an account of a Pacific island (cant remember the name) invaded by thousands of American and Canadian troops. At the end of the day, about 100 of them were dead. But military historians and experts the world over have agreed that there would have been many more deaths on both sides, if the island had any Japanese soldiers on it.
Yes, it was in the Aleutians
 
I recall reading an account of a Pacific island (cant remember the name) invaded by thousands of American and Canadian troops. At the end of the day, about 100 of them were dead. But military historians and experts the world over have agreed that there would have been many more deaths on both sides, if the island had any Japanese soldiers on it.
Yes, it was in the Aleutians
Kiska Island; one hell of a blue-on-blue, although some were from IEDs and some 'environmental'.

'The invaders landed to find the island abandoned; the Japanese forces had left two weeks earlier. Under the cover of fog, the Japanese had successfully removed their troops on 28 July. Despite US military command having access to Japanese ciphers and having decoded all the Japanese naval messages, the Army Air Force chose to bomb abandoned positions for almost three weeks. The day before the withdrawal, the U.S. Navy fought an inconclusive and possibly meaningless Battle of the Pips 80 mi (70 nmi; 130 km) to the west.

'Although the Japanese troops had gone, Allied casualties on Kiska numbered 313. They were the result of friendly fire, booby traps, disease, mines, timed bombs set by the Japanese, vehicle accidents or frostbite. Like Attu, Kiska offered an extremely hostile environment.'

Aleutian Islands Campaign - Wikipedia
 
Haven't seen the clip but the words in that briefing are usually attributed to 'Chesty' Puller, a legend in the USMC.
IIRC, the clip is shown on the Pacific War episode of the World at War. It might have been Puller, although the World at War clip was in the section on Tarawa, where Puller didn't serve (although the BBC could have transposed it out of direct context).

An interesting point here: the World at War was first shown in 1974, when most of the Pacific War veterans were in early middle-age. It is clear that the clip was shown to emphasize the fanaticism of the Japanese soldier, rather than the ethics of the statement, in an era when the universal view was still that the Japanese soldier deserved everything he got.

But, the World at War was significantly more sympathetic in its treatment of Japanese civilians; a prime objective of the series being to show how grim the war really was.
 
Funny how this seems to have developed into a dispute over whether the Japs were nice chaps who abided by the Geneva convention and who should have been afforded all the niceties that goes with it, or a bunch of blood crazed fanatics who despised the poor sods who became their prisoners.
I, having spoken to many who fought them and some who had the great misfortune to be captured by them, am of the latter opinion!
Their code of Bushido virtually ruled surrender out and it was considered more "honourable" to commit hara-kiri or seppuku than to surrender, hence the total lack of respect for any who did. Hence this guy Hiroo Onoda - Wikipedia
snip He was ordered to do all he could to hamper enemy attacks on the island, including destroying the airstrip and the pier at the harbor. Onoda's orders also stated that under no circumstances was he to surrender or take his own life.
He survived fighting a guerrilla war, albeit on a very small scale for 30 years, ignoring as propaganda various calls & leaflets dropped, only surrendering when his former CO was flown from Japan and gave him a direct order , thus
  1. In accordance with the Imperial command, the Fourteenth Area Army has ceased all combat activity.
  2. In accordance with military Headquarters Command No. A-2003, the Special Squadron of Staff's Headquarters is relieved of all military duties.
  3. Units and individuals under the command of Special Squadron are to cease military activities and operations immediately and place themselves under the command of the nearest superior officer. When no officer can be found, they are to communicate with the American or Philippine forces and follow their directives.
Onoda was thus properly relieved of duty, and he surrendered. He turned over his sword, his functioning Arisaka Type 99 rifle, 500 rounds of ammunition and several hand grenades."
The Japanese have done a lot of rewriting of history to try & cover some of their activities, as can be seen in this article ..
Okinawa Suicides and Japan's Army: Burying the Truth?
snip "Okinawa's trauma over what happened here after 545,000 American troops attacked this small archipelago is still deep. People here on Japan's southernmost islands want more recognition from Japanese society for their sufferings. But that wish collides with a growing nationalist effort to airbrush the past."
"After winning battles to play down Japan's war-era history of forcing Asian women to work in military-run brothels and Asian men to work in Japanese factories and mines, Nobukatsu Fujioka, a nationalist educator, started campaigning two weeks ago to delete from schoolbooks statements that soldiers ordered civilians here to choose suicide over surrender."
 
I’m curious as to why Australian troops under training were being told never to take Japanese prisoner in 1942 when they had little experience at that point fighting the Japanese and the Burma Railway was yet to be built.
 
I recall reading an account of a Pacific island (cant remember the name) invaded by thousands of American and Canadian troops. At the end of the day, about 100 of them were dead. But military historians and experts the world over have agreed that there would have been many more deaths on both sides, if the island had any Japanese soldiers on it.
Kiska also was the first use of the US/Canadian FSSF
 
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