Aussie nurses raped before being massacred by Japanese

#2
Nobody of that generation who had any experience of the Japanese would be surprised by this. It was part and parcel of their horrific code of conduct towards all non-Japanese. My father rarely spoke of his war service in India and Burma but assured me that the Japanese were vermin - and he would, probably, hold that view today if still around.
 
#3
As would my father in law,
.
 
#4
Complete gentleman Captain Cumberbatch, would always turn his back when confronted with a Japanese you could see the tension in his hands and shoulders. He never uttered a word about his war experience in Burma, he didn't have to. A kinder, more gentle chap you would have to work very hard to find.
 
#5
I knew one of my uncles as a quiet, pleasant, church every Sunday, school Headmaster.
When WW2 started he was in the Indian Army, Jat Regt but later volunteered for Force 136, an SOE organised, British Officered, bunch of Malays whose job was to attack Jap occupiers wherever, whenever.
He rarely spoke about the war, the only account he told me was about climbing a hill with a radio operator and calling down mortar fire on a Jap camp.
He took a bit of leave at one stage and went to see his wife in India. Somehow got hold of a Harley Davidson and rode up Burma on a very long journey. Somewhere around Cox's Bazaar he was attacked by robbers and had to shoot them with his Thompson.
End of the war he took surrender of two Jap units, one of my earliest memories being the 2 impressive swords above the fireplace. He had the strange experience of having to rearm Jap units to act as Police only a few days after their surrender.
A bit later he joined the Dorsets, got posted to HK. The Korean war had started and soon there was a Chinese surge.
He was ordered to take his company ( less NS soldiers !) over and wound up fighting alongside the Gloucesters.
I believe in later years his Christian faith was what got him through the memories, he certainly rarely spoke about it.
Before he died, he sent one of the swords back to the family of the officer who had surrendered it.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
I knew one of my uncles as a quiet, pleasant, church every Sunday, school Headmaster.
When WW2 started he was in the Indian Army, Jat Regt but later volunteered for Force 136, an SOE organised, British Officered, bunch of Malays whose job was to attack Jap occupiers wherever, whenever.
He rarely spoke about the war, the only account he told me was about climbing a hill with a radio operator and calling down mortar fire on a Jap camp.
He took a bit of leave at one stage and went to see his wife in India. Somehow got hold of a Harley Davidson and rode up Burma on a very long journey. Somewhere around Cox's Bazaar he was attacked by robbers and had to shoot them with his Thompson.
End of the war he took surrender of two Jap units, one of my earliest memories being the 2 impressive swords above the fireplace. He had the strange experience of having to rearm Jap units to act as Police only a few days after their surrender.
A bit later he joined the Dorsets, got posted to HK. The Korean war had started and soon there was a Chinese surge.
He was ordered to take his company ( less NS soldiers !) over and wound up fighting alongside the Gloucesters.
I believe in later years his Christian faith was what got him through the memories, he certainly rarely spoke about it.
Before he died, he sent one of the swords back to the family of the officer who had surrendered it.
Wow. A life lived.
 
#8
I've long been interested in the evacuation of Singapore and have always thought it very likely the nurses were raped.
Vivian Bullwinkel is, like Weary Dunlop, rightly considered a great Australian hero(ine) for her work in war and in peacetime.
But I'm also very wary of authors coming up with 'evidence' which become facts- especially when there is a book in the offing.
When you start talking of 'mis-matching threads' on the buttons of someone who has had to make do with the same uniform for over two years, you really are scraping the evidence barrel.

I agree with the words of the Director of the Australian War Memorial, quoted in the article.
AWM director Dr Brendan Nelson tells the BBC: "We don't deny or downplay these allegations; indeed, it's known rape and sexual assault are used as weapons in war. Nevertheless, as the sole survivor the incident, Lt Col Bullwinkel, passed away nearly 20 years ago, we do not, nor can ever categorically know what took place."
 
#9
I grew up around horror stories of the Japanese in WW2 and began to wonder how the nice Japanese blokes I worked with in Honda,Nissan and a few banks could be related to such fiends. Then I saw a chap being beasted infront of co workers by his boss and realised the gene is still their.
 
#10
No, no, no....

The modern accepted PC narrative is that the Japanese were peacefully minding their own business (well apart from the invasion of China, rape of Nanking, and so on) and then the war mongers in Washington and London started a war for no reason, and dropped the Atomic Bomb on a peaceful innocent country.

No - f*** them!
 
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MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#11
The barbarism of Japanese forces is well documented,the UK government played the items down during the war for morale reasons . The Chinese have certainly never forgotten the massacres in Nanking.Paradoxically one of the good guys in Nanking was the German ambassador.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#12
It’s interesting how a lot of WW2 veterans have absolute lifelong hatred for the Japanese but managed to quickly reconcile with the Germans.

My father in law landed with the ERY on D Day, fought through to Berlin, wounded at Caen, quick detour via Belsen to witness the horrors of the holocaust.

Never set foot in the Far East.

By the 50s he was skiing in Germany and Austria every winter, had German friends, drove BMWs for most of his life.

By comparison, absolutely hated anything Japanese. Seriously protested when my missus moved out there in the early 00s to work as an English teacher.

Similar story with my great uncle. Merville Battery veteran. Ended up becoming good friends with the German officer in charge of the battery after the war. Hated anything Japanese.

Were they really that much worse than the Nazis?
 
#13
No, no, no....

The modern accepted PC narrative is that the Japanese were peacefully minding there own business (well apart from the invasion of China, rape of Nanking, and so non) and then the war mongers in Washington and London started a war for no reason, and dropped the Atomic Bomb on a peaceful innocent country.

No - f*** them!
EU re-write of WW2 history, next part awaited.
 
#14
Were they really that much worse than the Nazis?
No, just culturally, religiously and appearance-wise different: easier to categorise as 'the other', so therefore less like us, while a German (stand aside the Lederhosen and dodgy facial hair) looks, and in many situations acts, more like us. That is not meant in any way as a criticism of those who held (or still hold) those beliefs against the Japanese; just the way we seem to be wired.




 
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AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#15
As would my father in law,
.
And my uncle, 2 Borders. Casevaced to a field hospital during the advance up the Irrawaddy, caught there during a counterattack, everybody slaughtered. It takes no imagination at all to see raped nurses in the scenario.
 
#16
Interesting research that uncovers a fact that was probably obvious but which in the circumstances of the time was covered up.

A WW2 massacre and revealing 'an awful secret'
No action was ever taken against Japanese post WW2, due to confused situation at the time there was problem to identify Jap Unit involved and assumption that most of the perps had been killed in later fighting. However, in view of this allegation perhaps the post war investigation should be looked at? was the opportunity to prosecute swept under the carpet?

Was in Oz about 18 months ago, local press reported the death of Australian Army WW2 vet and ex POW with the quote 'he could never forgive the Japanese'.
 

sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
#17
Nobody of that generation who had any experience of the Japanese would be surprised by this. It was part and parcel of their horrific code of conduct towards all non-Japanese. My father rarely spoke of his war service in India and Burma but assured me that the Japanese were vermin - and he would, probably, hold that view today if still around.
They still are , try working in the city for the wee scroates
 
#18
Another difference is that German society has acknowledged the crimes of the past. Japan has not, and the discussion of the War in Japanese school books contrasts with the German openness about the Third Reich.

I read a booked called No Surrender by a survivor from HMS Exeter after she was sunk in the Sundra Straits (he had also been aboard for the Battle of the River Plate) and POW. One time the POWs were made to work at a dock, and the crew of a visiting German merchantman was ahocked by what they saw, and tried to help them.
 
#19
It’s interesting how a lot of WW2 veterans have absolute lifelong hatred for the Japanese but managed to quickly reconcile with the Germans.
I would say that one of the reasons is that the Japanese have never really acknowledged the many atrocities and the cruelty in which they were involved. Although they have assiduously turne their backs on militarism, this period of their history has been all but whitewashed from their history books. The generations of younger Japanese who have followed the wartime generation are almost entirely unaware of this period of their country's history.

It might have something to do with the importance of 'saving face' within their culture.

The Germans have an entirely different attitude to the sins committed at that time. Although anyone who remembers the generation of Germans (including civilians) who lived through WW2 will know that it contained a significant proportion of arrogant, unrepentant and resentful pigs.
 
#20
My Grandfather would not allow Rice or any Japanese product in the house.
He hated them to the day he died.
My Gran was the same. She was also involved in de-mobing Japanese POW's. She described them as being broken men who would cringe and cower when anyone shouted.
She would not allow anything Japanese in her house.

Back in the 1980's we where on a train journey with her and the family at the next table where a family (grandparents, parents, grand kids) too. They where East Asian.
Their Grandfather sensed the tension, leaned over, put his hand on my grans hand and reassured her they where Chinese (in a London accent).
 
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