At year 18 point, resettlement advice, what courses are worth doing, who enjoys their civi job.....tell me how you got into it.

I am at my 18 year point. I intend to bang out at the EDP point in 4 years time. I will be 40 a OR7 with a nursing registration, a BSc in nursing and a Pg Dip (which if I complete the dissertation will be a MSc).

The problem is I am starting to not enjoy the job and the NHS is very variable interms of job satisfaction and it is always stressful. I am looking at other options and am open to anything, potentially totally different industries. Needs to be worthwhile, semi-well paid and not mega stressful. In doors/out doors not a issue. Probably not too manual as I would be doing it until I retire so plaster/roofer/scaffolder type jobs are out. Anywhere in the UK is doable although South West/Oxfordshire/Gloucestershire

I don't have kids, mortgage should be squared away by the time I leave and I have very few out goings. I would be happy putting in the hours to study and could fund this via savings and/or ELCs whilst still in. No option to re-trade now in service.

My questions are;

1) Does anyone have any suggestions for courses to do in the next 4 years (anything from NVQ-BSc)
2) Do you enjoy your job and if so how did you get into it?

Thanks for your time.
Hi.

I'm in construction health and safety.

There's a huge change in approach within the industry and from the enforcement agency (HSE) to emphasise 'health' over 'safety'.

This includes mental health.


I suspect that in the next few years a need will become apparent for occ. health providers giving screening, training, and other services.

Clients are already writing this in to contract requirements on major projects (that's exactly what I'm doing today).

Look at HSE's website mate.
 

Mufulira

Old-Salt
Interesting indeed, my wife is keen on Canada. I will do some looking into as it has not really crossed my mind as a option. Thank you.
If your Mrs is as qualified as you are in her field, perhaps you could consider Cruise ships as medic staff, the work is not overly strenuous and you get to see some magical spots around the globe. A few couples I know have done this and enjoyed the pay and benefits. The MSC would be icing on the cake!
 
Interesting indeed, my wife is keen on Canada. I will do some looking into as it has not really crossed my mind as a option. Thank you.
If you do, Alberta would be the best choice. An OH&S resettlement course would pad out your nursing CV, mucho demand in the private sector for OH&S RNs.

With a Master's the door to academia would be open to you also.
 

Mufulira

Old-Salt
If you do, Alberta would be the best choice. An OH&S resettlement course would pad out your nursing CV, mucho demand in the private sector for OH&S RNs.

With a Master's the door to academia would be open to you also.
A few years back, 25 to be exact, a group of Brit immigrant Doctors set up a clinic in a previously low serviced area North Western Ontario, Red Lake and provided service to a region of small gold mining villages. It turned out to be their pot of gold as there was 24/7 coverage for a region and a steady source of Gov't cash for them. They started to service fly-in-only communities as they acquired their own Cessna 180 on floats to provide this. Truly a heart warming experience as most Cdn doctors stay far away from under-serviced areas and congregate in Cities. Immigrant medics get the outreaches of the far Frozen North.
 
A few years back, 25 to be exact, a group of Brit immigrant Doctors set up a clinic in a previously low serviced area North Western Ontario, Red Lake and provided service to a region of small gold mining villages. It turned out to be their pot of gold as there was 24/7 coverage for a region and a steady source of Gov't cash for them. They started to service fly-in-only communities as they acquired their own Cessna 180 on floats to provide this. Truly a heart warming experience as most Cdn doctors stay far away from under-serviced areas and congregate in Cities. Immigrant medics get the outreaches of the far Frozen North.
I spent a good few years doing that in Northern Manitoba, Nunavut, and NWT. Week in week out, flights to and from Calgary covered, reciprocal flight benefits with a couple of major carriers, and two weeks pay for one week's work.
Alberta is currently having a hard time staffing it's Northern communities.
 

sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
study bookkeeping or accountancy you can work for a company or go self employed . believe it or not there are not enough accountants in the world . If you wish to specialise I would recommend getting your insolvency practitioners certificate. There are most definitely too few of these around .
me I was a combat Engineer , wiley op and gunner Gunner it took me a lot of time splashing about to fall into Credit Management where I became a fellow of my Institution , as a time filler I also became a Journalist, committee and later Director of the London Press Cub Wrote and published two book edited one . Was a media pundit on Masonic history and after dinner speaker on same .

What I am trying to say to you is look at your life and think about the next step , dont just spend your money on locksmiths courses and H&S . Look around and see if you can use the dosh to pay / part pay for a degree .
At 18 year would the Army pay for a degree even on a part time basis I am sure I read somewhere that there is a grant for that .

If you are more a manual man what would you like to do ? I did a six months welding course to find out not only was I a shit welder but the arse had dropped out of the game at that time, do some research whilst you are still in the Army's time ? have you saved a few bob towards a mortgage yet ?
Good luck and also have a look at a site called HIRE A Hero they asssit with CVs and sorting out what you can do.

I joined the T.A for extra dosh when I was younger,whilst I was away at weekends my then wife had a bloke in.
I never factored that into my plans ....
good luck its a hard world out here brother .
 
My young un works for Siemans on offshore wind turbines and is doing very nicely. I must say I have been really impressed with the way they treat their staff, they are well looked after. He mentioned that there are loads of ex servicemen employed by Siemans and more are encouraged to apply.

Have a look at this.....

Leaving the military to join the workforce | Life at Siemens
 

sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
My young un works for Siemans on offshore wind turbines and is doing very nicely. I must say I have been really impressed with the way they treat their staff, they are well looked after. He mentioned that there are loads of ex servicemen employed by Siemens and more are encouraged to apply.

Have a look at this.....

Leaving the military to join the workforce | Life at Siemens
Siemans are a great employer , i worked for the English branch here in uk ( 300 siemans company's in the UK only one is a British company .) and found them to be great at career enhancement courses training etc .

Just an aside after I left them due to a car crash , many years later I visited Berlin and met a chap who was currently working as a senior bod for a siemans division , his friends told me the following story.

A week or so after the Russians captured Berlin Dieter's family answered a knock at the front door where a few Russian solders were asking for certain people . Dieters dad was on the list and he was invited to pop outside for a chat , when they got him outside he was immediate shot . I have no idea what his military or civil status was .
Roll forwards a few years and young Dieter was getting ready to leave school and find work , when the family answered another knock two gents in suits asked to come in for a chat about dieters future . They were from SIEMENS and told him that he had a job waiting for him if he wanted it , he did and rose to management .

He didn't confirm the story because I did int ask him but how nice to think that it was true . Yet Charlie Coward hero of Auschwitz was left hanging in the wind when he came home from the war and it was only the generosity of some Jewish businessmen who found him a job stopped him and his family going short .
 
Cabin staff long haul, far flong places. Casevac madic, high call out pay.
Cruise ships.

CFB
Take an Orange from the box.
 

dragon825

War Hero
On a serious note, after discharge I finished school, ended up working oil and gas as a petroleum engineer in wireline case hole and open hole logging and completions. The company paid for my last year of school in New Orleans. Worked Gulf offshore, Texas, Louisiana swamp, Alaska, NWT, Northern BC, Alberta, Saskatchewan finishing up in downtown Calgary in a 22nd floor office.
Got bored with that and went into nursing, U of C. Worked every discipline possible, loved aviation critical care medevac. Now I work with private pharma contracts in the area of MS, RA, Paediatric Haemophilia, Hypopituitarism, and one or two other areas. I only do this as a hobby for the tax write offs, and because my wife inherited a **** off big ranch and a load of dosh.
You really should consider nursing in Canada, I brought a few nurses over a few years ago to work in critical care. The money is ace, and the work life balance is mega. I got in 55 days skiing last season, planning on 60 this coming season.
Lots of opportunities for British nurses in Alberta, quite valued here. Plenty of assistance with the immigration process
a good friend of mine was a military rotary instructor with thousands of hours and he looked into Canada thinking it would be a breeze. basically they weren't that interested until he told them his wife was a fully qualified paramedic, then they were very keen!
 
a good friend of mine was a military rotary instructor with thousands of hours and he looked into Canada thinking it would be a breeze. basically they weren't that interested until he told them his wife was a fully qualified paramedic, then they were very keen!
We looked at Oz. Wifes level 5 in early years would have got us in
 

ericferret

War Hero
Training courses are very much buyer beware.
Back in the dark ages (1978)8) the government ran TOPS courses (Training Opportunities).
Lots of Airtechs all three services enrolled. Three month conversion course to civil aviation. All costs including exam fees and accomodation covered and you could claim the dole. Walked out with a nice shiny new CAA engineers licence which has kept me employed for the last 40 years. Some of the courses were up to a year long and were real training with real qualifications at the end.

Then the focus shifted, some bright spark realised that if you were to offer more cheaper courses that didn't cost much you could help massage the unemployment numbers. It all went downhill from there.

Whatever training you do make sure the employers feel it has value.
Many employers have been bitten by so called further education up to and including university degrees.

Not long ago my daughter was told that her contract job with a large energy supplier was finally comming to and end after several years. She was asked if she had considered a full time job with them to which she replied that all the vacancies were for graduates. It was suggested that she might apply anyway. Happy in her new job!!!!!!
Sometimes it's you and your background that really counts.
Ex mil have an edge if you can find the right opening.
 
Screenshot_20190828-171429.png


Ken Borek are fantastic to work with.
Service both Arctic and Antarcyic and all points between.

Screenshot_20190828-171501.png


Fast Air are good

Others are Kewaten (sp.), Perimeter, Sky North, and one or two others
 
I am at my 18 year point. I intend to bang out at the EDP point in 4 years time. I will be 40 a OR7 with a nursing registration, a BSc in nursing and a Pg Dip (which if I complete the dissertation will be a MSc).

The problem is I am starting to not enjoy the job and the NHS is very variable interms of job satisfaction and it is always stressful. I am looking at other options and am open to anything, potentially totally different industries. Needs to be worthwhile, semi-well paid and not mega stressful. In doors/out doors not a issue. Probably not too manual as I would be doing it until I retire so plaster/roofer/scaffolder type jobs are out. Anywhere in the UK is doable although South West/Oxfordshire/Gloucestershire

I don't have kids, mortgage should be squared away by the time I leave and I have very few out goings. I would be happy putting in the hours to study and could fund this via savings and/or ELCs whilst still in. No option to re-trade now in service.

My questions are;

1) Does anyone have any suggestions for courses to do in the next 4 years (anything from NVQ-BSc)
2) Do you enjoy your job and if so how did you get into it?

Thanks for your time.
After about 20 years you stop punching idiots in the middle of the face for being a **** after that civilian life gets a little easier
 
After about 20 years you stop punching idiots in the middle of the face for being a **** after that civilian life gets a little easier
Literally yesterday I was wondering how much of a jack **** a civvy colleague has to be before they get a throat punch (Or at least some very frank, stern and upsetting words) got a 70:30 ratio of good blokes to toppers Elsans currently.
All the arrseholes are Brit Thailand exiles, this seems to be a fairly consistent observation wherever in the world, whatever the job
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Go into private practice, and contract to big pharma. Easy hours, lots of recreational time great money.
Or be really lazy and work in occ health doing nothing but polishing a desk and the fake Nigerian qualifications used to get the job. Dont forget to smile and laugh a lot and slightly anglicise your name yo something with a humorous double meaning in English.
Bitter me?
Slightly jealous that some iffy people with nonsense paper quals get paid to eff all.
Jealous yes!
Or you could do the signalling degree at Hallam and never do a stroke of work again as you would be mirse.
 

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