At year 18 point, resettlement advice, what courses are worth doing, who enjoys their civi job.....tell me how you got into it.

mess pres

Old-Salt
I am at my 18 year point. I intend to bang out at the EDP point in 4 years time. I will be 40 a OR7 with a nursing registration, a BSc in nursing and a Pg Dip (which if I complete the dissertation will be a MSc).

The problem is I am starting to not enjoy the job and the NHS is very variable interms of job satisfaction and it is always stressful. I am looking at other options and am open to anything, potentially totally different industries. Needs to be worthwhile, semi-well paid and not mega stressful. In doors/out doors not a issue. Probably not too manual as I would be doing it until I retire so plaster/roofer/scaffolder type jobs are out. Anywhere in the UK is doable although South West/Oxfordshire/Gloucestershire

I don't have kids, mortgage should be squared away by the time I leave and I have very few out goings. I would be happy putting in the hours to study and could fund this via savings and/or ELCs whilst still in. No option to re-trade now in service.

My questions are;

1) Does anyone have any suggestions for courses to do in the next 4 years (anything from NVQ-BSc)
2) Do you enjoy your job and if so how did you get into it?

Thanks for your time.
 
Last edited:

mrboo

Old-Salt
You could get your motorcycle licence and get a job with Deliveroo..

Or do HGV / PSV the uk is short about 70,000 drivers at the moment and not looking to get better anytime soon.
Once you have your licence you have it for life well sort of.
 
Don't forget nursing agencies, pay good.
My wifes last nurse did that along with Air Hostess
 

Toppet

Old-Salt
I am at my 18 year point. I intend to bang out at the EDP point in 4 years time. I will be 40 a OR7 with a nursing registration, a BSc in nursing and a Pg Dip (which if I complete the dissertation will be a MSc).

The problem is I am starting to not enjoy the job and the NHS is very variable interms of job satisfaction and it is always stressful. I am looking at other options and am open to anything, potentially totally different industries. Needs to be worthwhile, semi-well paid and not mega stressful. In doors/out doors not a issue. Probably not too manual as I would be doing it until I retire so plaster/roofer/scaffolder type jobs are out. Anywhere in the UK is doable although South West/Oxfordshire/Gloucestershire

I don't have kids, mortgage should be squared away by the time I leave and I have very few out goings. I would be happy putting in the hours to study and could fund this via savings and/or ELCs whilst still in. No option to re-trade now in service.

My questions are;

1) Does anyone have any suggestions for courses to do in the next 4 years (anything from NVQ-BSc)
2) Do you enjoy your job and if so how did you get into it?

Thanks for your time.
If all you have left is the dissertation, I'd finish the MSc- even if you dont go into nursing having completed a MSc looks good.

As pointed out - HGV could be a good option.
 
Couple of things for you to consider:

1. DeMontfort Uni do a Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) programme. It used to be that they had a specialist stream for health/NHS types to stream them off into upper management. Pays well, a mate of the wife's was a nurse in Leeds and stepped sideways into management, lots of travel and a damn good pay packet.

2. The other thing: Why not get into being a lecturer? I spent 8 years at uni after the army and enjoyed most of it, when I was doing post-grad stuff I was even running tutorials to support a couple of the professors. I know, who would have thought. The pay is relatively good, the hours are civilised, if done properly you also get some very long holidays and plenty of 'work from home' time. With nursing you are primarily university based but, you get to swan around the regional hospital to keep an eye on the students who have been allocated to you.

My own experience of the people I met at uni on the student side and the teaching side is that the ex-military people had an awful lot to offer the other students. Not only have they done the work-a-day things they are teaching but, they have also done those things in the places which the military sends you. Compared to the average lecturer most ex-military types have rockstar like reputations in universities.

3. Or, I knew some of these to nod at when it was called ExMed. Home


Oh yeah, do the firkin dissertation, alright!;)
 
Plumbing that's where the money is?
A friend of mine who runs a very successful plumbing business, (I suspect hes a millionaire) tell me that he constantly get CVs from squaddies (WO2s/staffies, not toms) thinking that the foundation course lasting a few weeks puts them on par with blokes who have been through an apprenticeship and have been doing the job for a couple of decades.
 

mess pres

Old-Salt
A friend of mine who runs a very successful plumbing business, (I suspect hes a millionaire) tell me that he constantly get CVs from squaddies (WO2s/staffies, not toms) thinking that the foundation course lasting a few weeks puts them on par with blokes who have been through an apprenticeship and have been doing the job for a couple of decades.
Yeah, got that impression looking at trade forums. Seems a full apprenticeship is the way to do it.
 
A friend of mine who runs a very successful plumbing business, (I suspect hes a millionaire) tell me that he constantly get CVs from squaddies (WO2s/staffies, not toms) thinking that the foundation course lasting a few weeks puts them on par with blokes who have been through an apprenticeship and have been doing the job for a couple of decades.
Those short course people are dangerous. I knew a chap (not a mate) who started a well advertised plumbing emergency repair company. His basic criteria were that you could find and turn off the stop tap and then change/install a ball-o-fix valve.

Plumbers, millionaires? Pfooey, perish the thought - barely scratch a living.
 
Plumbers, millionaires? Pfooey, perish the thought - barely scratch a living.
My mate, is minted and runs a rather large plumbing business, he might have won the lottery or inherited it.
 
Yeah, got that impression looking at trade forums. Seems a full apprenticeship is the way to do it.
Years of your life though, its okay when you are a kid, because you can always do something else if you think its ****, when you are in your mid forties its just wasted time.
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
I am at my 18 year point. I intend to bang out at the EDP point in 4 years time. I will be 40 a OR7 with a nursing registration, a BSc in nursing and a Pg Dip (which if I complete the dissertation will be a MSc).

The problem is I am starting to not enjoy the job and the NHS is very variable interms of job satisfaction and it is always stressful. I am looking at other options and am open to anything, potentially totally different industries. Needs to be worthwhile, semi-well paid and not mega stressful. In doors/out doors not a issue. Probably not too manual as I would be doing it until I retire so plaster/roofer/scaffolder type jobs are out. Anywhere in the UK is doable although South West/Oxfordshire/Gloucestershire

I don't have kids, mortgage should be squared away by the time I leave and I have very few out goings. I would be happy putting in the hours to study and could fund this via savings and/or ELCs whilst still in. No option to re-trade now in service.

My questions are;

1) Does anyone have any suggestions for courses to do in the next 4 years (anything from NVQ-BSc)
2) Do you enjoy your job and if so how did you get into it?

Thanks for your time.
Not the popo.. I joined with four lads all on full service pension and they all packed it in after a year. Too stressful when all you really need is beer tokens.

Consultancy work?

Or HGV but **** me, that'd bore the tears out of me.

I've been looking alot at EDLC courses as I've still got my £3k to spend but either the bar is too high or too low - non of the trades would actually make me competent and capable and none of the Uni stuff would be within my reach due to pre-reqs.

I was looking at NEBOSH H&S stuff just as a step in somewhere.

Good luck anyway!
 
Finish your MSc obvs.

How about a school nurse job? No shift work, no weekend work, loads of holidays. Pretty stress free I'd imagine. What's not to like?
 
My mate, is minted and runs a rather large plumbing business, he might have won the lottery or inherited it.
I was joking.

When I was at plumbing school we used to put interesting plumbing related articles on one of the notice boards, most to do with money. I pinned one on there from the Sunday Times; they were running a series of articles on the typical owner of particular marques of cars, the article I pinned up was about Ferrari owners and featured a self employed plumber in London. After we had all qualified and got out Corgi regiistration too my mate Bruce once had to fit a roof rack with pipe tube to his Porker 911 for a day when his Tranny had to go in for work - he had to park around the corner from customers houses and walk all his tools around.

Plumbers are poor;).
 
On a serious note, after discharge I finished school, ended up working oil and gas as a petroleum engineer in wireline case hole and open hole logging and completions. The company paid for my last year of school in New Orleans. Worked Gulf offshore, Texas, Louisiana swamp, Alaska, NWT, Northern BC, Alberta, Saskatchewan finishing up in downtown Calgary in a 22nd floor office.
Got bored with that and went into nursing, U of C. Worked every discipline possible, loved aviation critical care medevac. Now I work with private pharma contracts in the area of MS, RA, Paediatric Haemophilia, Hypopituitarism, and one or two other areas. I only do this as a hobby for the tax write offs, and because my wife inherited a **** off big ranch and a load of dosh.
You really should consider nursing in Canada, I brought a few nurses over a few years ago to work in critical care. The money is ace, and the work life balance is mega. I got in 55 days skiing last season, planning on 60 this coming season.
Lots of opportunities for British nurses in Alberta, quite valued here. Plenty of assistance with the immigration process
 

mess pres

Old-Salt
On a serious note, after discharge I finished school, ended up working oil and gas as a petroleum engineer in wireline case hole and open hole logging and completions. The company paid for my last year of school in New Orleans. Worked Gulf offshore, Texas, Louisiana swamp, Alaska, NWT, Northern BC, Alberta, Saskatchewan finishing up in downtown Calgary in a 22nd floor office.
Got bored with that and went into nursing, U of C. Worked every discipline possible, loved aviation critical care medevac. Now I work with private pharma contracts in the area of MS, RA, Paediatric Haemophilia, Hypopituitarism, and one or two other areas. I only do this as a hobby for the tax write offs, and because my wife inherited a **** off big ranch and a load of dosh.
You really should consider nursing in Canada, I brought a few nurses over a few years ago to work in critical care. The money is ace, and the work life balance is mega. I got in 55 days skiing last season, planning on 60 this coming season.
Lots of opportunities for British nurses in Alberta, quite valued here. Plenty of assistance with the immigration process
Interesting indeed, my wife is keen on Canada. I will do some looking into as it has not really crossed my mind as a option. Thank you.
 

mess pres

Old-Salt
If all you have left is the dissertation, I'd finish the MSc- even if you dont go into nursing having completed a MSc looks good.

As pointed out - HGV could be a good option.
I think that you have hit the nail on the head. Most people I talk to say finish the dissertation, so I think this is the way ahead.

The HGV option is good as well, one that I have always thought about, especially as a back up plan.

Cheers
 

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