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At what level would the human lose the fight?

Average bloke, let's say 30, in good health, average height, normal build, naked, no weapons. In a space that is big enough for them to move around, but small enough that they'd have to fight - let's say the animal is the female of the species and is acting as if protecting their young.

A big animal can't use the walls to crush, but could use weight in any other way.

At what level of animal would he start to lose out?

My initial thoughts - any animal around half the weight, if they could get very close quickly and somehow get a choke hold, they could get past the bites and scratches and win that way. Otherwise I think strength and weight would be the biggest factors.

Could a man suffocate a cow or a horse before being kicked to fuck?

Bears and the big cats etc... no contest, same with the big apes.
 
Average bloke, let's say 30, in good health, average height, normal build, naked, no weapons. In a space that is big enough for them to move around, but small enough that they'd have to fight - let's say the animal is the female of the species and is acting as if protecting their young.

A big animal can't use the walls to crush, but could use weight in any other way.

At what level of animal would he start to lose out?

My initial thoughts - any animal around half the weight, if they could get very close quickly and somehow get a choke hold, they could get past the bites and scratches and win that way. Otherwise I think strength and weight would be the biggest factors.

Could a man suffocate a cow or a horse before being kicked to ****?

Bears and the big cats etc... no contest, same with the big apes.


No contest - have you met my wife?
 
Animals don't have to be big to be deadly.
 

Dwarf

LE
Snowflake generation, most of them couldn't take on an agressive hamster.
 
Snowflake generation, most of them couldn't take on an agressive hamster.
Too right, it is the little animals you have watch out for.
Went for a blood test the other day, the Nurse had real trouble getting enough blood out of me.
I should have just tried to give one of our Cats a worming tablet, the little buggers draw enough blood to fill buckets.
 
Average bloke, let's say 30, in good health, average height, normal build, naked, no weapons. In a space that is big enough for them to move around, but small enough that they'd have to fight - let's say the animal is the female of the species and is acting as if protecting their young.

A big animal can't use the walls to crush, but could use weight in any other way.

At what level of animal would he start to lose out?

My initial thoughts - any animal around half the weight, if they could get very close quickly and somehow get a choke hold, they could get past the bites and scratches and win that way. Otherwise I think strength and weight would be the biggest factors.

Could a man suffocate a cow or a horse before being kicked to ****?

Bears and the big cats etc... no contest, same with the big apes.
The NAAFI bar, check:-
If my dad had tits he would be my mum, IF is unanswerable, too many variables.
Does the bloke have piles, short sighted, slightly deaf, maybe arthritis, a dodgy knee, speech impediment, terminal alopecia, wears a bowler hat and blue suede shoes, ingrowing toenails,.
Is the animal fur fin feather or skin, 2 legs or eight, north or southern hemisphere, day or night, before the 9 O'clock watershed. Is the room in a house, flat, caravan, nuclear bunker, hydrogen filled zeppelin, a B&Q warehouse. The sweaty minge knocking shop, Nevada.

All these questions must be answered before I can programme my Sinclair ZX 81 computer, for a definitive answer,...... wait wait.......the answer is.......... 42.

( nurse the screens !)

The only man to have the answer to IF, was Rudyard Kipling.
 

Teg61

Old-Salt
Could a man suffocate a cow or a horse before being kicked to ****?
Eh. No is the short answer!
I’ve had patients in ITU that tried taking shortcuts through fields that had cows and calves in them. The cows head butted then trampled the person who ended up with punctured lungs and concussions.

Never mess with a moody cow!
 
Average bloke, let's say 30, in good health, average height, normal build, naked, no weapons. In a space that is big enough for them to move around, but small enough that they'd have to fight - let's say the animal is the female of the species and is acting as if protecting their young.

A big animal can't use the walls to crush, but could use weight in any other way.

At what level of animal would he start to lose out?

My initial thoughts - any animal around half the weight, if they could get very close quickly and somehow get a choke hold, they could get past the bites and scratches and win that way. Otherwise I think strength and weight would be the biggest factors.

Could a man suffocate a cow or a horse before being kicked to ****?

Bears and the big cats etc... no contest, same with the big apes.
Man would rely on his superior brain and would source the materiels to make a trap and then subdue the animal by beating it too death.

That Ed Stafford chap does it all the time.
 

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I could take a small Vulcan given sufficiently inspiring music...

Centuries on and using pugil sticks , the gunny would be proud

1601304691598.png
 
Honey badger.

I'll hold your coat.

A few years ago whilst filming in Namibia for a BBC wildlife series we were based at a sanctuary for Cheetahs and Leopards. One of their eminent anthropologists was radio tracking a roaming Cheetah when his vehicle narrowly missed/glanced off a Honey Badger. The bloke stopped the vehicle a little later, climbed onto the roof to get a good signal and was fiddling with his receiver when suddenly a very cross Honey Badger (presumably the bugger had followed him) turned up growling and snapping. The bloke tried to climb down but every time he did the badger would make a run at the vehicle forcing him back on to the roof. His comms, water and food were inside the vehicle.

For 2 days he was trapped on the roof by the belligerent little bastard, resulting in the bloke suffering dehydration and heat stroke..
 
Honey badger.

I'll hold your coat.

I'll see your Honey Badger and raise you a Wolverine. Apart from both of them being Mustelidaes I reckon those two are somehow closer related. I've never came across a Honey Badger but I've came across a couple of Wolverines on my travels.

The first time I came across one (from a distance of about 200 yards and watching through my binos) was when a Grizzly decided a Wolverine would make a nice snack, by fvck did that Grizzly learn the hard way.

The wolverine kept on attacking the bear until the bear thought the hell with this and legged it. The second time was when I caught one in a coyote trap (foot hold). When I showed up to check the trap the Wolverine went ballistic, it was trying to get at me to rip the head from me.

I had to decide how to get it out of the foot hold and came up with two choices. One was to shoot it and the other was to an anesthetize it and relocate it. After speaking to herself and her speaking to our Veterinarian it was decided I would head out to the Vets office and pick up a pole syringe for doing that job, herself supplied the anesthetic.

With me keeping the wolverine distracted she manage to get it poked with the knockout drug, she had to use a thick needle to make sure it didn't bend as their hides are that tough.

It took around 10 minutes before it went down and we still gave it another 10 minutes to make sure. Once relocated she gave it another injection to wake it up and we watched it from a safe distance until it was able to take care of itself.

I've no doubt the Honey badger is a tough wee guy and needs to be given where he lives but the old Wolverine ain't no slouch either when it comes to dealing with lions, bears, wolves and other large predators out there.
 
Average bloke, let's say 30, in good health, average height, normal build, naked, no weapons. In a space that is big enough for them to move around, but small enough that they'd have to fight - let's say the animal is the female of the species and is acting as if protecting their young.

A big animal can't use the walls to crush, but could use weight in any other way.

At what level of animal would he start to lose out?

My initial thoughts - any animal around half the weight, if they could get very close quickly and somehow get a choke hold, they could get past the bites and scratches and win that way. Otherwise I think strength and weight would be the biggest factors.

Could a man suffocate a cow or a horse before being kicked to ****?

Bears and the big cats etc... no contest, same with the big apes.
What the fcuk happened to Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.....
 
I'll see your Honey Badger and raise you a Wolverine. Apart from both of them being Mustelidaes I reckon those two are somehow closer related. I've never came across a Honey Badger but I've came across a couple of Wolverines on my travels.

The first time I came across one (from a distance of about 200 yards and watching through my binos) was when a Grizzly decided a Wolverine would make a nice snack, by fvck did that Grizzly learn the hard way.

The wolverine kept on attacking the bear until the bear thought the hell with this and legged it. The second time was when I caught one in a coyote trap (foot hold). When I showed up to check the trap the Wolverine went ballistic, it was trying to get at me to rip the head from me.

I had to decide how to get it out of the foot hold and came up with two choices. One was to shoot it and the other was to an anesthetize it and relocate it. After speaking to herself and her speaking to our Veterinarian it was decided I would head out to the Vets office and pick up a pole syringe for doing that job, herself supplied the anesthetic.

With me keeping the wolverine distracted she manage to get it poked with the knockout drug, she had to use a thick needle to make sure it didn't bend as their hides are that tough.

It took around 10 minutes before it went down and we still gave it another 10 minutes to make sure. Once relocated she gave it another injection to wake it up and we watched it from a safe distance until it was able to take care of itself.

I've no doubt the Honey badger is a tough wee guy and needs to be given where he lives but the old Wolverine ain't no slouch either when it comes to dealing with lions, bears, wolves and other large predators out there.
I've come over a few grizzlies in my time...
 
Cow with calf? Good luck. Fucking vicious if they are of a severely protective mindset. A friend of mine was tossed by a cow in April and still does not have full use of his right arm back.

You would end up cornered,squashed and trampled to death.
 
Cow with calf? Good luck. ******* vicious if they are of a severely protective mindset. A friend of mine was tossed by a cow in April and still does not have full use of his right arm back.
Tossed by a cow you say....
 

Niamac

GCM
I should have just tried to give one of our Cats a worming tablet, the little buggers draw enough blood to fill buckets
Sorted that; bath towel, grabbed and wrapped up 'til only head shows then jaws apart, in, wait until he swallows.
 

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