At 34 turning 35 am I to old for the Parachute Regiment?

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Maybe join the Royal Signals, Royal Engineers, RAMC etc which have parachute units. Qualify as a bleep or wedge, and if Parachute training seems like it's still interesting, volunteer for the Para units. Or even SAS if you want to go balls-out. That way you'll have something to fall back on if it doesn't work out.
 
Maybe join the Royal Signals, Royal Engineers, RAMC etc which have parachute units. Qualify as a bleep or wedge, and if Parachute training seems like it's still interesting, volunteer for the Para units. Or even SAS if you want to go balls-out. That way you'll have something to fall back on if it doesn't work out.
When I looked into it the other year, the SAS had a cut-off of 35 for applications.
 
When I looked into it the other year, the SAS had a cut-off of 35 for applications.
We were told the same at a recruiting brief from "them" late last year, although it was hinted that blokes a couple of years over that may be considered in special circumstances if they were fit and robust enough for it still.
 
Paras raise your hands... Hats, stuff your opinions.

When 18-20 year old me was busy falling out of airplanes and attending our version (and others' versions) of arduous courses, it ******* hurt, I kept moving, and finished the mission. There were "old guys" admirably doing the same with even more pain in evidence that obviously took them longer to recover from. But we all did it. That was the culture, no kids verses gramps bs that you see out of online trolls who've never done anything more strenuous that COD thumping themselves.

The only people that have a valid opinion are not the special snowflakes that never fell out of a perfectly good aircraft.

Looking back 30 years, and asking myself "would you have done everything over again at 35 that I did at 18?" Knowing full well what problems I would have forever after with my spine, hips, knees, and ankles I can, with certainty, say "Yes, I ******* would."

If you can't understand that, you haven't been there, and you don't ******* count.

Para bod is for winners.
 
There are people in the Army who are paid to assess you and tell you if you're too old or not eligible to do things. Pursue your dream and give them the opportunity to make those decisions, rather than trying to second-guess them.

You have to be in it to win it. Good luck.
yes Crapita
 
Paras raise your hands... Hats, stuff your opinions.

When 18-20 year old me was busy falling out of airplanes and attending our version (and others' versions) of arduous courses, it ******* hurt, I kept moving, and finished the mission. There were "old guys" admirably doing the same with even more pain in evidence that obviously took them longer to recover from. But we all did it. That was the culture, no kids verses gramps bs that you see out of online trolls who've never done anything more strenuous that COD thumping themselves.

The only people that have a valid opinion are not the special snowflakes that never fell out of a perfectly good aircraft.

Looking back 30 years, and asking myself "would you have done everything over again at 35 that I did at 18?" Knowing full well what problems I would have forever after with my spine, hips, knees, and ankles I can, with certainty, say "Yes, I ******* would."

If you can't understand that, you haven't been there, and you don't ******* count.

Para bod is for winners.
Yeah but can you launch a fridge over a bridge wing onto a Somali's head?

...You throbber.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
If you watched that recent "Paras - Men of war" thing on TV you'll have noticed at least one of the recruits was mid 30's and he made it through training. If you're fit and don't have any niggling injuries prior to joining then go for it, you won't know otherwise!
Wasn't he a "retread" though? He'd been through Phase 1 & 2 before.
 

Londo

LE
Paras raise your hands... Hats, stuff your opinions.

When 18-20 year old me was busy falling out of airplanes and attending our version (and others' versions) of arduous courses, it ******* hurt, I kept moving, and finished the mission. There were "old guys" admirably doing the same with even more pain in evidence that obviously took them longer to recover from. But we all did it. That was the culture, no kids verses gramps bs that you see out of online trolls who've never done anything more strenuous that COD thumping themselves.

The only people that have a valid opinion are not the special snowflakes that never fell out of a perfectly good aircraft.

Looking back 30 years, and asking myself "would you have done everything over again at 35 that I did at 18?" Knowing full well what problems I would have forever after with my spine, hips, knees, and ankles I can, with certainty, say "Yes, I ******* would."

If you can't understand that, you haven't been there, and you don't ******* count.

Para bod is for winners.
Its a merican 45x45
 
Do we still have Gunner-Paras? If so then the OP could go for that as Gunner, get his beret and wings and then if time catches up he still has the rest of the RA to continue his career in.
And also:

Engineers
Signals
Loggies
RMP
Medics

That's just off the top of my head, there will be others.
 

Nemesis44UK

LE
Book Reviewer
Hi guys new poster here. I have just had my briefing this week and scheduled for Assessment day in 6 weeks. My 3 are Parachute Regiment, Gunne-Special Observer, Driver.
I'm fit and have the times for the run for Parachute, but turning 35 am I too old for P-Company and the 28 weeks? Will my legs be able to pass at my age?
Thanks for replies and advice.
The answer lies within.

1) To be any kind of special forces operator requires a single mindedness that is rare and physical ability that would put you on a par with professional atheletes or higher. I knew a Signals guy who was 45 years old, could drink a bottle of whisky a night, swamp himself then run first thing in the morning like a cheetah. He made soldiers half his age look stupid.

It isn't age, it's ability.

2) A quick Google search reveals the age requirements for entrance into the Paras. Therefore, you aren't asking as a need for information, you are asking people's opinions of you. If you want to make it as a para, it needs to be something that you crave and with all due respect, this doesn't seem to be true in your case. If it was, there wouldn't be anything anyone could tell you that would put you off or change your mind. As it is, it seems to be a bit wishy-washy.

3) As others have mentioned upthread, be warned that your nickname will be "Grandad." You will be mocked and hazed both by other recruits and the permanent staff. You will have your motivations questioned and you will have to be better than most to be judged equal. That may not bother you and if you were locked onto this career course, it shouldn't.

I'm not one to rain on your parade, far from it, but search your heart and be honest with yourself and what you're looking to achieve. Your age and fitness level shouldn't be a barrier to your entrance, but if you're going into this half-heartedly, you will get hurt, both physically and mentally. Some people have life-changing injuries in training accidents jumping out of planes, so be sure it's something you're happy taking the risk for.

However, it's better to spend six years as a Para than fifteen years as a craphat. Or so people tell me!
 
Have you read First Man In by Ant Middleton? Gives an interesting insight into the Para’s, I wouldn’t do it at 35, not only the fitness it seems they have the mentality of 20 year olds (being 20 year olds) I found as I got older I didn’t want to be brawling in bars and smashing pint glasses over my head (or others).
They don't let ants into the Parachute regiment, he's lying.
 
Ant Middleton was about 18 when he passed P Company in 9 Para Squardon RE, after being champion recruit. He left the Army, and after a year or 2 as a civvy, (some as a police cadet) did Royal Marine basic training at Lympstone, as Kings Badgeman. That was all before his time in the SBS.
 
No you are not too old. The age limit for 4Para at the moment is 38 and I know two people who have passed P-Company aged 40 in the past 18months. The key to attempting an arduous course in your 30s is much more prudent preparation, lots of stretching, pilates and sports massages and careful buildup. It’s true you will get injured more easily and recovery doesn’t happen as quickly as those teenage racing snakes but endurance and mental resilience can make up for that IF you remain injury free. Secondly be realistic about what you’re trying to get out of it, what you can give the regiment and what you want to do with your limited time. Being realistic at the outset will help bomb proof your will to get through when it starts hurting. 35 year olds are not what they were 30 years ago, good luck!
 
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Splitz

Old-Salt
Technically speaking, you're not too old. But since your'e asking for opinions I'd say yes you are.

What is your goal? You're 35, you should have a few. Is it to join the Paras? OK, you could do that - but what then? You won't get anywhere once you're in because age will definitely catch up with you before much longer and then you'll be relegated to another unit where you'll bore the arse off everybody else by telling them 'I used to be a Para, you know'. Do you really want to be that man?

If I were you I'd regretfully accept that I should have fulfilled that particular ambition fifteen years ago, and go for something more realistic. Look at a technical arm; Royal Engineers (my alma mater), Royal Signals, REME; somewhere you can serve for a decent period, earn some promotion whilst you're in and get a skill which you take with you when you leave and which should set you up for a job when its all over. And if you really want a red beret so you can jump out of a perfectly good aircraft for no particular reason you could volunteer for 9 Parachute Squadron RE like I did. I'm pretty sure you'll find a para squadron in the other tech arms too.
 

foxs_marine

War Hero
Unfortunately Alex passed away in January this year. A nice chap and a good storyteller.

Edited to add:
And yes he was then one of the oldies whose guts I admired for doing it as his age.
Sad to hear this, I enjoyed his book very much & he was a keen artist too.
 

Bravo_Bravo

On ROPS
On ROPs
Not too old for the Foreign Legion Paras!

The Legion recruits up to the age of forty and although I joined at eighteen, I had the utmost admiration for the grizzled old farts in their late thirties who made it through. Now I'm a very grizzled old fart much older than that.
Nous avons pas seulement des armes...
 
@Alec_Lomas can you cast your eyes upon this please, and respond, if you can be arsed.
 

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