Assistance on .22 rifle selection

#1
Hello all. Bit of a story but keep with it as there is a point to this. My son has taken a shine to shooting. We have joined a local club and go on Sat afternoons for a bit of a try out on a few weapon types but it seems he has a bit of skill with .22 rifles. He is autistic and has become a bit fixated with the whole thing but the club are very professional and keep him grounded. My question is, what rifle would you suggest is a good alrounder, if there is such a thing, and what sort of price range am I looking at.

Many thanks
 

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
#3
Club standard rifle is a ruger semi-auto. It depends on condition but I bought mine second hand for about £150 - it's a bit of an old dog but good for plinking. Have a look at guntrader.co.uk. The alternative is to go for a more target-orientated rifle and you can get some good, albeit old fashioned ones, for sub-£100.
 
#4
Club standard rifle is a ruger semi-auto. It depends on condition but I bought mine second hand for about £150 - it's a bit of an old dog but good for plinking. Have a look at guntrader.co.uk. The alternative is to go for a more target-orientated rifle and you can get some good, albeit old fashioned ones, for sub-£100.

Yep, Ruger 10/22 is the one to go for. Get the fiddly open holding catch replaced and you're away. Cheap ammo as well.
 
#5
In semi auto, a Ruger 10/22

In bolt action, a CZ.

Lots around at cheap money, a dealer will almost certainly have a selection of new and second hand ones.
 
#9
Semi-automatic long arms are banned in Australia. They were the subject of a very generous buy-back program. One fortunate chap allegedly bought a job lot of armalite and SLR barrels and actions as scrap and became very wealthy overnight as they were classed as firearms under the new legislation so the government had to buy them at full whack. And yes, I'm happy with a Win94.
 
#10
Depends on what sort of shooting he wants to do. Gallery needs a semi really, purist target a single-shot Anschutz with a sling, is he going to use it for bunnybashing as well in which case you want probably a bolt-action with a magazine.
 
#11
I dont plan on any hunting, purely target shooting. He has used both semi auto and a single shot but prefers the semi auto
 
#12
I dont plan on any hunting, purely target shooting. He has used both semi auto and a single shot but prefers the semi auto
We all prefered the semi auto at that age, but thank christ my father was a tight fisted old bugger, and only lashed out for a bolt action, and then withheld the mag until I'd learned to hit what I was shooting at.

Not that having the mag made a great difference in my rate of fire, as I shoot left handed, and the rifle was a righthander.
 
#13
My local gun dealer has around fifty CZ rifles of one kind or another, and half a dozen older single-shot.

I learnt to shoot with a novel rifle bought by my dad in 1930 - a Walther Model 1A Sport. It is a semi-auto ABD a bolt action, depending on whether or not you turn down the bolt handle. First I learnt to shoot as a single-shot b/a, then as a five-shot b/a, than then when I was about ten and earning a couple of monies doing chores, I graduated to the semi-auto.

I still have the rifle, but no longer have the ould da. He packed up and left the firing point forever back in 1971.

I agree with the [other] old buggers here - having a semi-auto is great fun, but it does not instil you with that pressing need to make each shot count.

tac
 
#14
If he's just doing targets, he wants a target rifle. Semis aren't really for that purpose. Can't he use club guns for now?

BTW, when you say he's autistic, to what extent? Is his doctor likely to endorse his being granted a Firearm Certificate (I assume he's over 14)? It might be wise to have a chat with the doctor before putting in the application, to avoid the disappointment if he is turned down on those grounds.

Even if it presented an obstacle, the club may be willing to hold a rifle for him as 'their' but for his exclusive use - a chat with the officials there would probably yield some useful advice and possibly they will know where a suitable weapon might be got.
 
#15
BSA Martini-action target rifles are extremely cheap - the auctions are full of them. They are excellent target rifles, and often are available as a complete kit with sling, sight elements, accessories, etc.
 
#16
BSA Martini-action target rifles are extremely cheap - the auctions are full of them. They are excellent target rifles, and often are available as a complete kit with sling, sight elements, accessories, etc.
Yup. I have two such rifles - one is a left hand MkII Intl, the other a right-hand version. One came with a complete set of Al Freeland micrometer tube sights as well as the special LH Parker-Hale standard backsight, and a box of 120 Anschutz foresight elements - all for £55. I sold the foresight elements for $350 on ***y. I have a x18 Unert Varmint Special on one, and a giant Tasco x16 Supertarget on the other. Both still shoot five shots of cheap GECO into a raggedy hole at 50m - when I get it right.

tac
 
#17
My question is, what rifle would you suggest is a good alrounder, if there is such a thing,
There really is no such thing.

Target Shooting requires a purpose-built target rifle - nothing else will do. As has been said, Anschutz tends to be flavour of the month but can be quite expensive. (I dread to think how much it would cost to replace my Super Match.) However I also have a BSA Model 12 that I picked for literally next to nothing for Historic Shooting and can endorse the post made by 4(T) about them.

I also have a Ruger 10/22 which is solely reserved for vermin control. No use to man or beast for serious target shooting.

I can't offer much comment on gallery rifle except to say that I have a Bremmer SAR-15, that not only fits the bill but looks the part.
 
#18
I'm making a broad assumption here, and therefore ready to be SDIF, but it would appear to me that the OP is asking about a rifle that will suit a casual target shooter, to shoot in much the same way 90% of the 260+ members of my club enjoy. There ARE serious .22 target rifle shooters in my club, as the county prize lists will readily testify, but for sure I'm not one of them.

As such, I have found over the last 30/40 years that the CZ [formerly BRNO] brand are a great choice of a first or second rifle, plus a half-way decent scope - AFTER the rudiments of shooting have been learned by shooting with open sights.

I have a [formerly] serious target rifle in the form of an Anschutz 1409 - with its thumbhole stock and fancy butt-plate - it cost me £25 about five years ago when we were clearing out the club gun safe. I've put on it, in order, a x18 Unertl, x16 Tasco SuperTarget, and now have a T36 Weaver. It also needed a LOT of TLC, but at ~£2500 cheaper than a new one, I could cope with that.

Great fun .

tav
 
#19
If that's really what he wants, he should buy my Sako Finnfire, with Bushnell telescopic sight and screwcut, a bargain at only £500 and with a brick of 500 hollowpoint subs thrown in for free.
 
#20
Target Shooting requires a purpose-built target rifle - nothing else will do. As has been said, Anschutz tends to be flavour of the month but can be quite expensive. (I dread to think how much it would cost to replace my Super Match.)
They can also be quite cheap - someone in our club has just sold on a Supermatch for £300 (giving up the sport).

Anschutz are pretty much the most sensible option. Plentiful spare parts, simple and robust (compared to the Bleikers, certainly), and good enough to win an Olympic gold medal while setting a new world record. Take a peek at the battered old thing that Sergei Martynov uses...

Buying a new Anschutz [here] will set you back for £900 for a simple club-level 1903. If your son starts to take the sport seriously, it can get rather more expensive (with the consolation that it's probably still cheaper than golf). If he takes up three-position rather than prone-only, good on him, but that's the point at which he needs a more expensive stock :)

A good-quality, brand new, barrel and action are just over a grand. The rest goes on the woodwork/metalwork you bolt it into, and the sights you stick on it. If your son fires from the prone position only, it can be a comparatively simple piece of wood. If he starts doing standing and kneeling, then the stock and the clothing need to be a bit more adjustable (and a bit more expensive).

A cheap jacket can still be had for a few hundred quid - make sure to include jacket/rifle/sling in your budget, although it's normally a gradual process when moving away from "using club kit" to "having your own personal kit". The Edinkillie website I linked to above is the most comprehensive in the UK for target shooting, and it doesn't sell tat.
 

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