Ashamed, the wounded soldier abandoned by his country

#1
Story by Terri Judd, The Independent. Awkward timing in view of our support for Headley Court, but this is one soldier's story.

Ashamed and racked with guilt, the wounded soldier abandoned by his country

Lance Corporal Mark Dryden is racked with guilt and ashamed. The source of his guilt is that he saw a soldier he greatly respected die beside him. The source of his shame is that he is an amputee, in his view, an unsightly embarrassment.

Almost two years after he lost his arm in the roadside bomb, which killed fellow fusilier, Sgt John Jones, in Basra, he has yet to have a working prosthetic fitted. He feels abandoned by the Army, the country, and the government he served for 12 years.

"I have been suicidal for the past 18 months. I once sat on the top of a cliff, drunk in my car, for two hours," the 30-year-old explained without a hint of self-pity. "It is the guilt, the lack of help, getting forgotten about. I just felt life was not worth living. I am infantry and we simply don't leave anyone behind. I got left behind."
All he wants now is enough occupational therapy so he can wash, dress and feed himself single-handedly and for someone to tell him when he will be discharged from the Army so he can move on.
something felt wrong that day, 20 November 2005. For once, no one was willing to talk to them and they cut short the patrol. At an Iraqi police vehicle checkpoint, they were waved on into an eerily quiet street.
He has nothing but praise for his regiment, which kept in constant touch. He speaks with equal admiration of the nurses and doctors at Basra's military field hospital, as well as the "overworked and underpaid" NHS staff at Selly Oak Hospital in Birmingham.

But the moment he left hospital things went horribly wrong. He was forgotten, left at home to sink into despair, as his mother Elizabeth, a 58-year-old factory worker, gave up her job to care for him 24 hours a day. His wicked sense of humour is still evident but he has post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) - mood swings, paranoia, flashbacks and nightmares in which he can still "taste the burning".

This week, the Ministry of Defence opened a new ward at the military rehabilitation centre, Headley Court, praising its "world-class care". L/Cpl Dryden has a very different opinion. "Headley Court left me for eight months. It seems someone had lost my paperwork," he said. "How could they not find us when my regimental sergeant major was phoning me from Iraq every two weeks? I was really, really bitter."

The first two prosthetic arms were the wrong size. He still has not been told how to use the third. He contracted MRSA but was not told for two months. On the day he was diagnosed with PTSD, he got into a furious argument with officers, was charged with insubordination, threatening behaviour and disobeying a direct order and threatened with losing his pension.

Headley Court, he said, is "overpacked" with patients without legs or arms, suffering from brain injuries or burns. "I blame the Government for a lack of military hospitals. I don't think they realised how many people were going to be injured in Iraq and Afghanistan. The British public would be shocked."
L/Cpl Dryden has started a sports psychology degree. But he cannot get a job as he has does not know when he will be discharged. Nor it seems, does the Army.

This week, as Under Secretary of State for Defence Derek Twigg stood at Headley Court and promised the "best care possible for our servicemen and women", L/Cpl Dryden received a call from the Army's resettlement team asking whether he had been discharged. L/Cpl Dryden, it seems, has been "misplaced".
Full story at LINK
 
#2
army again i think you will find a lot more than just one fella. bring it out to the papers then the army will act its the only way to get things done.
 
#3
hackle said:
Story by Terri Judd, The Independent. Awkward timing in view of our support for Headley Court, but this is one soldier's story.

Ashamed and racked with guilt, the wounded soldier abandoned by his country

Lance Corporal Mark Dryden is racked with guilt and ashamed. The source of his guilt is that he saw a soldier he greatly respected die beside him. The source of his shame is that he is an amputee, in his view, an unsightly embarrassment.

Almost two years after he lost his arm in the roadside bomb, which killed fellow fusilier, Sgt John Jones, in Basra, he has yet to have a working prosthetic fitted. He feels abandoned by the Army, the country, and the government he served for 12 years.

"I have been suicidal for the past 18 months. I once sat on the top of a cliff, drunk in my car, for two hours," the 30-year-old explained without a hint of self-pity. "It is the guilt, the lack of help, getting forgotten about. I just felt life was not worth living. I am infantry and we simply don't leave anyone behind. I got left behind."
All he wants now is enough occupational therapy so he can wash, dress and feed himself single-handedly and for someone to tell him when he will be discharged from the Army so he can move on.
something felt wrong that day, 20 November 2005. For once, no one was willing to talk to them and they cut short the patrol. At an Iraqi police vehicle checkpoint, they were waved on into an eerily quiet street.
He has nothing but praise for his regiment, which kept in constant touch. He speaks with equal admiration of the nurses and doctors at Basra's military field hospital, as well as the "overworked and underpaid" NHS staff at Selly Oak Hospital in Birmingham.

But the moment he left hospital things went horribly wrong. He was forgotten, left at home to sink into despair, as his mother Elizabeth, a 58-year-old factory worker, gave up her job to care for him 24 hours a day. His wicked sense of humour is still evident but he has post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) - mood swings, paranoia, flashbacks and nightmares in which he can still "taste the burning".

This week, the Ministry of Defence opened a new ward at the military rehabilitation centre, Headley Court, praising its "world-class care". L/Cpl Dryden has a very different opinion. "Headley Court left me for eight months. It seems someone had lost my paperwork," he said. "How could they not find us when my regimental sergeant major was phoning me from Iraq every two weeks? I was really, really bitter."

The first two prosthetic arms were the wrong size. He still has not been told how to use the third. He contracted MRSA but was not told for two months. On the day he was diagnosed with PTSD, he got into a furious argument with officers, was charged with insubordination, threatening behaviour and disobeying a direct order and threatened with losing his pension.

Headley Court, he said, is "overpacked" with patients without legs or arms, suffering from brain injuries or burns. "I blame the Government for a lack of military hospitals. I don't think they realised how many people were going to be injured in Iraq and Afghanistan. The British public would be shocked."
L/Cpl Dryden has started a sports psychology degree. But he cannot get a job as he has does not know when he will be discharged. Nor it seems, does the Army.

This week, as Under Secretary of State for Defence Derek Twigg stood at Headley Court and promised the "best care possible for our servicemen and women", L/Cpl Dryden received a call from the Army's resettlement team asking whether he had been discharged. L/Cpl Dryden, it seems, has been "misplaced".
Full story at LINK
Outfuckingrageous!
 
#4
Arrse... Another thread running with same story.

Is there an end to this treatment? Not until funding is increased and the spin is removed. Come on Government. Give us what we deserve for risking our lives.
 
#5
What happenned to, LEST WE FORGET.
seems they are forgotten even quicker these days, an abysmal way to treat our nations finest.
 
#7
hackle said:
Story by Terri Judd, The Independent. Awkward timing in view of our support for Headley Court, but this is one soldier's story.

Ashamed and racked with guilt, the wounded soldier abandoned by his country

[ British public would be shocked."
Full story at LINK[/quote]

This is just totally disgraceful this soldier and other soldiers need help straight away with there medical problems

These issue's should be addressed immediately
:x
 
#8
Is this one for BAFF?

msr
 
#9
finnjim said:
What happenned to, LEST WE FORGET.
seems they are forgotten even quicker these days, an abysmal way to treat our nations finest.
Hah! Don't you know that "Lest We Forget" just isn't fashionable these days? :roll:

Oh, it's easy enough for the pollies to pay lip-service every time November 11th rolls around, after all the dead don't demand anything, don't really cost anything and even the families fade away after a while. It's those pesky wounded folk who keep demanding, well help that cause all the hassle.

Now, if only we could think of a way to get rid of them... Oh yes! If we ignore them long enough, hopefully they'll have enough of the pain and the humiliation and knock back all of their painkillers with a bottle of gin. Oh yes, that sounds like a plan, the Treasury will be so pleased...

CNUTS! :pissedoff:
 
#11
It beggars belief and rises bile to the back of my throat. Just WHAT will it take to knock the 'system' into some vague semblance of order? Blood on the hands of ministers, bean counters, MOD et al obviously isn't enough! :x

More immediately important a Q is what can be done to assist this chap?
 
#12
Covenant? what covenant??

Duty and loyalty seems to have become a bit of a one-way street these days.

Perhpas we should blame the town planners ??
 
#13
.Dolly said:
More immediately important a Q is what can be done to assist this chap?
See the other thread mentioned - soldiersmum knows the mother of Sgt Jones, who is eager that the PM is lobbied about this. I will be sending letters to my MP, to Gordon Brown, to Her Majesty The Queen, to HRH The Prince of Wales and to the Colonel-in-Chief of the RRF, HRH The Duke of Kent for a start!

I'm going to PM an ARRSEr who was a good friend of Sgt Jones to see if he can help with getting contact details for LCpl Dryden so that messages of support can be sent to him.
 
#15
MILITARY Hospitals in France 15 [Fifteen]..........
military hospitals in the UK................NIL......just about sums up the failure of government to look after its fighting men, women and veterans.
 
#16
DozyBint said:
.Dolly said:
More immediately important a Q is what can be done to assist this chap?
See the other thread mentioned - soldiersmum knows the mother of Sgt Jones, who is eager that the PM is lobbied about this. I will be sending letters to my MP, to Gordon Brown, to Her Majesty The Queen, to HRH The Prince of Wales and to the Colonel-in-Chief of the RRF, HRH The Duke of Kent for a start!

I'm going to PM an ARRSEr who was a good friend of Sgt Jones to see if he can help with getting contact details for LCpl Dryden so that messages of support can be sent to him.
DB, BLESMA may be able to help. I have put guys in contact with them before and they helped with rehab etc. Link below for British Limbless Ex Service Mens Association.

http://www.blesma.org/

Hope this helps the bloke, and others out. If he was a Mu$!'M terrorist, burned to a crisp by his own vehicle the Government would have had Specialists at hand to cater for his every whim!!!! 4kin Shameful

OC
 
#17
Again another story showing how the Goverment and the MOD are ignoring the suffering of wounded troops.

They REFUSE :evil: to reopen any Military Hospitals, lamely stating that in order for soldiers to receive specialist care they need to be in the NHS! However, why can't the MOD do what NHS hospitals do? That is buy in specialist services that they don't supply! In politicians speak "We closed the hospitals down to save money believing that there would never be another war, and now we're too tight fisted to reopen them and admit that we were wrong despite the increasing number of wounded soldiers arriving every day!"

The truth of the matter is that these traumatised soldiers can NEVER receive the care they deserve on the NHS, not because the NHS staff don't care, it's because they are constantly battling to overcome increasingly unrealistic waiting list targets set by the Government.

Intrestingly enough, these targets never seem to include waiting times for service personnel. :?
 
#19
They are the disappeared. The amputees you never hear from or see again. It's disgusting that they have given so much and now left to fend for themselves. Anyone in any way connected with his situation should feel thoroughly ashamed. It needs shouting from the roof tops, if only those with the power to change things would listen.
 

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