Arrsers self taken photo collection.

D

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Had Dyson's for nearly 30 years. They were great when the first came out. Unfortunately the latest ones are over engineered, complicated and difficult or impossible to clean properly. The 5 year warranty is a saving grace but it wont cover the problem now. My wife hoovered up a pencil that has pierced a hole in an internal tube. I can get a replacement part (though not from Dyson as they wont sell the part online) but it's an awkward bugger to take apart. Wont be buying another one.
PS: You need to sort out your phone dictionary/spell check/prediction :santa:
 
I like the Dyson products ,now on our third big vac and still got a small dog animal vac.

Both that failed,died do so after tyears and a couple of months. Strang with the 5 year warrenty?

Triedto take them both apart but coulnt be arrsed buying the propietary tools for the job....


Unless you know a cheaper way?
I smash them with a large hammer, then go and buy a Henry Hoover, made by Numatic, in the UK by British Workers paid a decent wage, Dyson is bloody rich enough as it is, and I hate his products
 
Must be RMP all right. This one's having a crafty fag break.

Keystone Kop.JPG
 
this was my favourite a Triumph Daytona, small and nimble, and bloody quick on the track, unlike some of the motorcycles, the geezer just rolled it out the back of a van, sprinted along and it fired up silky smooth
none of the macho bullshit that goes with lots of classic racing ie the big motorhomes and toolkits
this is proper racing
he let me sit on it and it was perfect in every way
Miki Sprosen is bloody quick
Team Wildcard Racing Blog
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Asian Painted Frog (Kaloula pulchra) in the garden today when I unrolled the hose for watering:

20180618_162004a.jpg


I'm told that it's not edible.
 
View attachment 338733

I can see the general arrangement of my modern Triumph in that motor.

View attachment 338734

Looks like the rear brake is on the left, meaning the gear change was on the right. I believe it was sometime in the 60s that everyone settled on the Japanese control pattern that we have today.

Tachometer spins anti clockwise too. Was that a norm back when those bikes were built?
 
Looks like the rear brake is on the left, meaning the gear change was on the right. I believe it was sometime in the 60s that everyone settled on the Japanese control pattern that we have today.
Oooer, you don't know the half of it. At one stage I was running a Norton Dominator, ( Gear lever one up for first, to change up, press gear lever down. An MOV Velocette, which was the opposite, which was at least up for up, and vicky vercky for down. Both on the right hand side. To top it off, a CX500 Honda. Gear lever on the wrong side, up for up and down for down. And a five speeder to boot!
Confused! I was.
Regularly.
 
View attachment 338733

I can see the general arrangement of my modern Triumph in that motor.

View attachment 338734

Looks like the rear brake is on the left, meaning the gear change was on the right. I believe it was sometime in the 60s that everyone settled on the Japanese control pattern that we have today.

Tachometer spins anti clockwise too. Was that a norm back when those bikes were built?
the tacho is not the origional. looks like an aircraft instrument, not sure why its reversed though, perhaps the tacho drive is not origional as its for racing, this one spins up to 10K, I am pretty sure that the early 500cc engines did not have a tacho drive at all, and the later ones it was driven from the left hand side, so perhaps thats a Bonneville casing added on
 
Oooer, you don't know the half of it. At one stage I was running a Norton Dominator, ( Gear lever one up for first, to change up, press gear lever down. An MOV Velocette, which was the opposite, which was at least up for up, and vicky vercky for down. Both on the right hand side. To top it off, a CX500 Honda. Gear lever on the wrong side, up for up and down for down. And a five speeder to boot!
Confused! I was.
Regularly.
and even odder, many European motorcycles such as early guzzis, had right hand heel and toe gearchange, and the sidestand was also on the right hand side, due to the change in camber
 

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