Arrse Reptile and odd pets thread.

Never seen a lizard in the wild up here in the Northern wastelands.
Seen a few sand lizards when down in Cornwall/Devon/Somerset.
It was quite slow in the (relatively) cold early morning. Handy as it took me a while to spot it even though I heard it scrabbling about for a good 30 seconds before.
 

Kirkz

LE
It was quite slow in the (relatively) cold early morning. Handy as it took me a while to spot it even though I heard it scrabbling about for a good 30 seconds before.
A good spot though, they are difficult to see at the best of times let alone get a picture of.
 

Troy

LE
Snakes as pets? No thanks. When I hear news of some snake or other being rescued or recovered. My first thought is, "Don't save it - kill it!"

I'll just leave this little ditty here, where there are enough of you weirdos to appreciate it:
Hissing Sid
 

Kirkz

LE
Snakes as pets? No thanks. When I hear news of some snake or other being rescued or recovered. My first thought is, "Don't save it - kill it!"

I'll just leave this little ditty here, where there are enough of you weirdos to appreciate it:
Hissing Sid
Yet you were intrigued enough to enter this thread and join in.

You are a secret serpent lover, you're just scared to admit it.
 
My wife wanted a Burmese Python, so after some quibbling (I'm not particularly interested) she got one and called it Stanley; later finding out it was a female. From a 18" tiddler, she got to 10' unbelievably fast, eventually being swapped for a Corn Snake with a friend whose female had died.
There followed:
a Boa, called BC who was horrendously greedy, once finishing her rat and starting on the other end of Stanley's, swapped for another Corn Snake.
Corn Snakes, Kelloggs (like minds!) Fruit, Fibre, Legless, Lugless, Lidless and Fluffy.

She then wanted lizards, I said only one and drew up a mock contract, listing all conditions which I got her to sign, framed it and stuck it on the wall.
All conditions breached, probably within days.

Kenyan Plated Lizards, Nickel & Dime, Nickel died and Dime is now about 35 years old and going strong.
Leopard Geckos Fungus & Mildew (thanks Raymond Briggs!), rescued from a friend of a friend whose Dad wouldn't let them in the house and had been kept in an unheated viv in and unheated garage for a year or more. They thrived once she got them and bred -> Mould & Spore.
There were another couple of Leopards, swapped for F&M offspring, but I can't remember their names.
Day Gecko, Bostik, who'd been living with F&M in the same unheated viv. We put him in ideal conditions and he died a short while after - go figure.
Bosc Monitor, Gnasher - hated me and prone to violence, I got the job of feeding him and the 18" bastard split my thumbnail from top to bottom through welding gloves. He got swapped in a deal with the pet shop he was bought from for an adult someone had swapped for a parrot (!) This was 'Not-Gnasher' a metre long, 8kg and an absolute darling; it was like having a small dog. He was too large to be in his viv permanently so only slept in there overnight, coming out in the morning to have a wander and then mostly sleep in a heat tunnel I'd built behind the sofa - my wife even trained him to crap/pee in the utility room with vinyl flooring. We boarded him at a reptile shop whilst we went on holiday. No idea what happened, but he came down with Colitis and died after several relapses (side note, the vet treating him was the one that discovered the first case in the 2001 Foot & Mouth outbreak).

She didn't get any more and our electricity bill has gradually decreased as the horde succumbed. I've taken over the care of Dime, the survivor, whose eyesight isn't as good as it once was as he often gets my fingers instead of the mealworm they're holding - obviously his heat sensors still work!
It's also quite nice not having one of the freezers packed with frozen mice/rats/chicks and 1000 crickets in a big fauna box drowning out the tv - just 25 fuzzy mice now and 1kg of mealworms in the fridge; quite civilized, really....... lunch anyone?

Sorry, no photos as it seems they're on my other laptop.
 

Kirkz

LE
My wife wanted a Burmese Python, so after some quibbling (I'm not particularly interested) she got one and called it Stanley; later finding out it was a female. From a 18" tiddler, she got to 10' unbelievably fast, eventually being swapped for a Corn Snake with a friend whose female had died.
There followed:
a Boa, called BC who was horrendously greedy, once finishing her rat and starting on the other end of Stanley's, swapped for another Corn Snake.
Corn Snakes, Kelloggs (like minds!) Fruit, Fibre, Legless, Lugless, Lidless and Fluffy.

She then wanted lizards, I said only one and drew up a mock contract, listing all conditions which I got her to sign, framed it and stuck it on the wall.
All conditions breached, probably within days.

Kenyan Plated Lizards, Nickel & Dime, Nickel died and Dime is now about 35 years old and going strong.
Leopard Geckos Fungus & Mildew (thanks Raymond Briggs!), rescued from a friend of a friend whose Dad wouldn't let them in the house and had been kept in an unheated viv in and unheated garage for a year or more. They thrived once she got them and bred -> Mould & Spore.
There were another couple of Leopards, swapped for F&M offspring, but I can't remember their names.
Day Gecko, Bostik, who'd been living with F&M in the same unheated viv. We put him in ideal conditions and he died a short while after - go figure.
Bosc Monitor, Gnasher - hated me and prone to violence, I got the job of feeding him and the 18" bastard split my thumbnail from top to bottom through welding gloves. He got swapped in a deal with the pet shop he was bought from for an adult someone had swapped for a parrot (!) This was 'Not-Gnasher' a metre long, 8kg and an absolute darling; it was like having a small dog. He was too large to be in his viv permanently so only slept in there overnight, coming out in the morning to have a wander and then mostly sleep in a heat tunnel I'd built behind the sofa - my wife even trained him to crap/pee in the utility room with vinyl flooring. We boarded him at a reptile shop whilst we went on holiday. No idea what happened, but he came down with Colitis and died after several relapses (side note, the vet treating him was the one that discovered the first case in the 2001 Foot & Mouth outbreak).

She didn't get any more and our electricity bill has gradually decreased as the horde succumbed. I've taken over the care of Dime, the survivor, whose eyesight isn't as good as it once was as he often gets my fingers instead of the mealworm they're holding - obviously his heat sensors still work!
It's also quite nice not having one of the freezers packed with frozen mice/rats/chicks and 1000 crickets in a big fauna box drowning out the tv - just 25 fuzzy mice now and 1kg of mealworms in the fridge; quite civilized, really....... lunch anyone?

Sorry, no photos as it seems they're on my other laptop.
Great names for the lizards, that post had me laughing out loud while reading it.
Excellent post Mukker.
 
I trawled through my other laptop and found these. There were many photos taken, but I can't find them, which means:
They're in an album and missed scanning.
They were scanned and subsequently deleted/lost in an HDD catastrophe.
I haven't disclosed this information as I'm not stoopid.

Anyway, some photos from the '80s, a period of hair, no belly, mahoosive aviator specs and loud furniture.

Dime, sunbathing.
DSCF0022.JPG

One of the Cornsnakes
Raw00008.JPG

BC and a bit of Stan
The _80s861.jpg

BC the Boa and a growing Stanley. Some while later my wife let a Cornsnake go across her glasses and it shit in her eye. That's typical of her luck, but no further such photos were taken.
The _80s867.jpg

A very young Stanley, at 10' I'd have got a broken nose.
The _80s967.jpg

The original Gnasher, malice in his eyes.
The _90s123.jpg

2 Cornsnakes, doing what they're good at.
The _90s114.jpg


Just remembered - Stanley, like @archer 's Cyd worked out how to slide the 1/4 plate glass door open. Before we got a lock, she often slid out and across the back of the sofa.
Our Rottweiler, Kruger was fascinated by Stan, but would go nowhere near the bitey end. He used to like laying across the front of the sofa and would let you put your feet over him, as long as you kept still.
Stan went across the top of the sofa and down the side. When she got to the front she squeezed herself between the sofa and Kruger.
"Grrrrr!" without waking up. "Grrrrrrrrrr!.............GRRRRRRRRRRR!" He then woke up fully and looked round.
I'd never seen a big dog stand up and reach the other side of the room in under 1 second before.
 

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StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
Quick bump for this thread.

I'm currently re-reading Sir David's "Life in Cold Blood", it's the best comfort/convalescence book ever. If you haven't already read it, I'd strongly recommend getting a copy, it's an easy but fascinating read with loads of excellent photos.
 

Kirkz

LE
As Kirkz Mk 2 has finally moved out I have room to move some stuff about, finally got both snakes and vivs into one room.

20210704_143913.jpg
 

chrismcd

Old-Salt
she was behind the fridge
Our kids used to let the King snake out with monotonous regularity. But, he could always be found curled up on the circular drip tray over the compressor at the back of the freezer.
Not an escapologist (unlike bloody Corn snakes that I am sure pet shops sell for the repeat business!) but strong enough to push open a carelessly fixed cover.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
I'm going to be boring my long-suffering partner shitless when he finally comes home from 10 days working away, with the stuff I've been finding out about reptiles!

Got my "wish list" for when we finally retire (or semi-retire).
 
There may be a piece of human psychology as yet unresearched - or unexplained.

I read this Thread, I value your interest in the subject, a regular down my local annually goes to Expos in Der Vaterland to trade in these beasties ......

I warm to cats, dogs, horses, most humans, dolphins, deer, and thousands more life forms.
I don't warm in any way to reptiles, insects ...

Don't hate them, arn't repulsed by them.

Just don't understand any attraction to them.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
There may be a piece of human psychology as yet unresearched - or unexplained.

I read this Thread, I value your interest in the subject, a regular down my local annually goes to Expos in Der Vaterland to trade in these beasties ......

I warm to cats, dogs, horses, most humans, dolphins, deer, and thousands more life forms.
I don't warm in any way to reptiles, insects ...

Don't hate them, arn't repulsed by them.

Just don't understand any attraction to them.

Each to their own. I'm interested in all animals, although there's a few I'm not keen on (spiders for one, although I'm a lot less phobic than I used to be but wouldn't be interested in keeping tarantulas). Reptiles, on the other hand, I find fascinating, perhaps for their "otherness", even though Pedro the BC bit me as a kid and I threw a hysterical fit as only a 12 year old girl can "Mum Mum, are you REALLY REALLY sure Pedro isn't poisonous?? Mother: just wash it with soap and water. I'm fascinated by the feel of snakes, their skin, their muscular properties, their behaviour, learning to handle them safely, I could go on ...
 

Kirkz

LE
There may be a piece of human psychology as yet unresearched - or unexplained.

I read this Thread, I value your interest in the subject, a regular down my local annually goes to Expos in Der Vaterland to trade in these beasties ......

I warm to cats, dogs, horses, most humans, dolphins, deer, and thousands more life forms.
I don't warm in any way to reptiles, insects ...

Don't hate them, arn't repulsed by them.

Just don't understand any attraction to them.
In my case I'm allergic to most things with fur and feathers so reptiles make a good alternative pet.
As explained earlier in this thread I got into keeping snakes by accident but it's been a great learning curve and I've really enjoyed keeping the two I have and would love to get a constrictor at some point in the future.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
In my case I'm allergic to most things with fur and feathers so reptiles make a good alternative pet.
As explained earlier in this thread I got into keeping snakes by accident but it's been a great learning curve and I've really enjoyed keeping the two I have and would love to get a constrictor at some point in the future.
Check out Wrigglies in Bedfordshire. They do DWA handling sessions as well as your "harmless" stuff. :)
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
My wish list, for what it's worth:

Boa constrictor and/or royal python, veiled chameleon, big unit of a sulcata tortoise, and the ultimate - Gaboon Viper!

I certainly would not mention this on any other social media. Do you know what scares me more than a venomous snake? The thought of some nutjob breaking in!!
 
There may be a piece of human psychology as yet unresearched - or unexplained.

I read this Thread, I value your interest in the subject, a regular down my local annually goes to Expos in Der Vaterland to trade in these beasties ......

I warm to cats, dogs, horses, most humans, dolphins, deer, and thousands more life forms.
I don't warm in any way to reptiles, insects ...

Don't hate them, arn't repulsed by them.

Just don't understand any attraction to them.
I can see what you mean, being the 'uninterested' one of the keepers. I couldn't understand why my wife wanted reptiles, and never felt any bonding to the many snakes she had. The Leopard Geckos were pretty boring, but the Day Gecko, pattering around on the sides and glass of the viv', suddenly making a dart for a cricket as amusing. The Bosc was like having a small dog, being out of his viv' for most of the day. Feeding him a rat, which he would gently take and then hearing the 'Crunch' as he mashed it to swallowing size was thought-provoking. The Plated lizard has become part of the family in the 30 odd years we've had him. I've taken over his care full-time, and he hopefully eyes my presence at all times as a sign that a mouse or mealworm is due. He also likes a bit of banana which is 'fun' to give him as it is at ambient temperature and the fingers holding it are the target; I'm quite adept at a last minute dodge to place the banana where my thumb just was - I don't like using tweezers as the sound of his old gnashers hitting them, even plastic ones isn't pleasant. He gets a mouse every Sunday that is put on the top of the viv' to warm up. He knows it's there and spends the time while we're having breakfast sitting on his basking rock staring at me, willing me to give it to him.
I wouldn't say I loved him like a dog, but caring for him is more than a chore.
 

kimmi851

War Hero
Does anyone have any contacts that might have gerbil litter (the stinkier the better) in the Aldershot area, please? My friend has a Royal Python who is off his food (she took him in after he was abandoned in the winter in a box), last time he did this she used a friend's gerbil litter to "soak" the rat in and it woke Juicy (Beetlejuice) up nicely and he went back to eating. Unfortunately the friend who was donating the litter had all her gerbils die during lockdown just as Juicy gets fussy again. She can't find any pet shops willing to offer it (who knows what they think it is for), and she is getting a little worried.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
Does anyone have any contacts that might have gerbil litter (the stinkier the better) in the Aldershot area, please? My friend has a Royal Python who is off his food (she took him in after he was abandoned in the winter in a box), last time he did this she used a friend's gerbil litter to "soak" the rat in and it woke Juicy (Beetlejuice) up nicely and he went back to eating. Unfortunately the friend who was donating the litter had all her gerbils die during lockdown just as Juicy gets fussy again. She can't find any pet shops willing to offer it (who knows what they think it is for), and she is getting a little worried.

Well that's killed the conversation Kimmi!

Surely you know some rats in Aldershot? ;-)
 

kimmi851

War Hero
Well that's killed the conversation Kimmi!

Surely you know some rats in Aldershot? ;-)

Sorry about that everyone, plenty of rats in Aldershot, just for some reason no gerbils (no comments on lurid Sun headlines from the 80s about "comics" and squaddies are coming to mind, honest).
 

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