ARRSE Kennel Club - A Dog Owners Thread

Grownup_Rafbrat

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Today we had the flue swept, and it's chilly evening so we lit the woodburner. Guess who's sitting closest to it?
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Aphra

Old-Salt
Today we had the flue swept, and it's chilly evening so we lit the woodburner. Guess who's sitting closest to it?View attachment 611265
She looks very comfy. My golden retrievers, after a day out with guns or picking up and following a good hose down at the outdoor tap, would happily snuggle as close to the gas fire as caninely possible. More than once I've had to turn the fire off and open the windows to get rid of the smell of singed fur!
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Well today didn't go as planned....
Went down to Southampton to see if the Ridgeback we'd been asked to take on was acceptable to Ruby, met all the dogs - including a very 'lively' 3 year old boy who was eventually fine with us, despite lots of knocks to the chin, nose and eye sockets - basically he'd not been educated past being a puppy by the looks of things, despite the owner being a breeder and having 'done lots of courses'....
Anyway, the plan was to take him for a walk without the owner but with Ruby, got him in his harness & got Ruby ready to go... introduced them, no dramas, lots of tail wags and sniffs... waiting for the electric gates to open he lunged at Ruby as she was sniffing his front leg and took a bite out of one of her ears, enough to expose cartilage.... So one trauma dressing and Haemostat pad later we're on the way to the owners vets....

Whilst it was unprovoked and without warning, I'm glad it happened today, not weeks or months down the line, the result could have been much worse.
We're back at home now after a three hour drive and Ruby is happy to be home, although the drugs are making her a bit vacant!
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Fortunately I'd pre-emptively booked the week off so she'll be getting lots of attention and cuddles on the settee whilst she feels sorry for herself.
 

Ritch

LE
Poor Ruby!!!

Give her a cuddle and a pat from me.
 

Aphra

Old-Salt
Well today didn't go as planned....
Went down to Southampton to see if the Ridgeback we'd been asked to take on was acceptable to Ruby, met all the dogs - including a very 'lively' 3 year old boy who was eventually fine with us, despite lots of knocks to the chin, nose and eye sockets - basically he'd not been educated past being a puppy by the looks of things, despite the owner being a breeder and having 'done lots of courses'....
Anyway, the plan was to take him for a walk without the owner but with Ruby, got him in his harness & got Ruby ready to go... introduced them, no dramas, lots of tail wags and sniffs... waiting for the electric gates to open he lunged at Ruby as she was sniffing his front leg and took a bite out of one of her ears, enough to expose cartilage.... So one trauma dressing and Haemostat pad later we're on the way to the owners vets....

Whilst it was unprovoked and without warning, I'm glad it happened today, not weeks or months down the line, the result could have been much worse.
We're back at home now after a three hour drive and Ruby is happy to be home, although the drugs are making her a bit vacant!
View attachment 611473

Fortunately I'd pre-emptively booked the week off so she'll be getting lots of attention and cuddles on the settee whilst she feels sorry for herself.
My goodness, how awful. Poor Ruby - and poor you and Mrs OT, too, having to deal with it. I take it the breeder will be paying the vet fees. It sounds like you're right about this dog not being properly socialised and trained and I'm sorry for the dog, too, as I'd imagine he's going to be palmed off on anyone who'll take him, rather than a good owner like you who would put in the effort to turn him into a good boy. Clearly the breeder isn't up to the job.

It's good you're around over the next week to spoil and pamper Ruby, bless her. Give her a tummy rub from me, too.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
To be fair, she did say she couldn't rehome him now as he'd be a liability, even in a single dog house, the problem is, there are a couple of her dogs that seem well adjusted but the rest are just, well, out of control. There's a seven year old female that doesn't know how to sit on command FFS!
I do feel sorry for her and the dogs, they seem like they're just churning round in circles, getting faster and faster, one day it'll all burst open.
Breeders breed dogs, some think they understand them and a few think they are the font of all knowledge about whichever breed(s) they are selling. It's a business primarily - sometimes a labour of love and there are some that are genuinely knowledgable and caring. Ridgebacks are headstrong and need consistent bounds, rules and pack structure - and something to 'do' (even if that is lie around on a settee in the sun, waiting for you to finish what you're doing).

The breeder did ring the vets and pay for treatment, to her credit. I feel really sorry for Ruby, she's done nothing wrong and always approaches other dogs as if they are her best friend... to top it off, there's fireworks going off tonight, still, she can only hear them on one side!
 

Aphra

Old-Salt
To be fair, she did say she couldn't rehome him now as he'd be a liability, even in a single dog house, the problem is, there are a couple of her dogs that seem well adjusted but the rest are just, well, out of control. There's a seven year old female that doesn't know how to sit on command FFS!
I do feel sorry for her and the dogs, they seem like they're just churning round in circles, getting faster and faster, one day it'll all burst open.
Breeders breed dogs, some think they understand them and a few think they are the font of all knowledge about whichever breed(s) they are selling. It's a business primarily - sometimes a labour of love and there are some that are genuinely knowledgable and caring. Ridgebacks are headstrong and need consistent bounds, rules and pack structure - and something to 'do' (even if that is lie around on a settee in the sun, waiting for you to finish what you're doing).

The breeder did ring the vets and pay for treatment, to her credit. I feel really sorry for Ruby, she's done nothing wrong and always approaches other dogs as if they are her best friend... to top it off, there's fireworks going off tonight, still, she can only hear them on one side!
At least she's trying to do the right thing. That contradiction between the dogs is a worry though. It may be just bad luck or maybe she was trying to introduce new blood into the line but didn't do the right research. I'm sure we've all seen that happen.

One of my nephews decided he wanted a golden retriever after seeing how good mine were but as I never bred mine I gave him the details of the breeder mine were from. She never advertises and will take back any dog at any time, for any or no reason and makes that clear from the outset. She does require a lot of hoops to be jumped through which was fine by me. Nephew contacted her but because she wanted lots of information from him before she'd consider putting him on her very long waiting list, in a huff he went elsewhere and got a dog that was not well bred although its pedigree looked good to a novice. The poor pup was far too narrow all over, grew too tall and was, to be as kind as I can be, more than a bit thick. It was virtually impossible to train him because he just couldn't focus and to top it all, he didn't have the sweet temperament usually found in goldies. My nephew couldn't understand how my dogs looked and behaved so differently from his and I think if he could have, he'd have given him back when it became clear his odd gait wasn't just puppyish lollopyness. You'll have guessed, yes, hip dysplasia. Both I and the good breeder gave my nephew a checklist but the prospect of getting a puppy quickly overtook his usual good sense. There's a reason why someone always has puppies available and it's not good, as you and I know. Poor boy had a short, painful life and was put to sleep to stop his suffering. It broke my nephew's heart and was a painful lesson for him but he's had black labs for years now, all lovely, well mannered, sweet natured eejits as they should be, and very much loved. Let's hope for the best for the Ridgeback breeder and her dogs.

I do hope Ruby recovers well and that her friendly nature isn't affected too much. I'd ban fireworks altogether if I could. My dogs were working gundogs so loud bangs never bothered them. Nor did the vacuum or hairdryers. A plastic bag caught on a bush, however....
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
We had a Ridgeback with Megaesophagus a few years ago, the breeder had us jumping through hoops to be 'approved' - most of which would be against DPA now, the husband was a court usher and was (apparently) using his position to 'vet' potential owners and check identities etc... Anyway, we were offered a pup that had been sold once but returned for some vague reason, we took her on, with some behaviour issues that were due to her living with her parents and having to 'fight' for her food - soon ironed out with the help of our big old boy! long story short, she had problems digesting food, thought to be due to speed eating, turned out to be megaesophagus. Our vet said he had another case of it in a Ridgeback a week or so after Ella was diagnosed with it. Yup, another pup from the same litter. Breeder contacted, no response, KC contacted - 'we suggest you discuss your concerns with the breeder'.... Although we'd had rescues before, that was the point we decided to look for rescues in preference to pups - as much as we'd love to have a few-weeks-old bundle of fun howling and sh*tting everywhere, the reward of rehoming an older dog and seeing them happy, relaxed and enjoying life is reward enough.

I'm hoping to take her out mid-week to see some of her occasional acquaintances in the dog world, just to see how she reacts to friendly noses....
Oddly she's fine with gunfire, thunder and general unexpected noise - it's just fireworks....
Our big old boy, who would shrug off anything and everything that would reduce most dogs to whimpering wrecks, would react really badly to umbrellas of all things!

On one hand, I'm of a mind to let Ruby see out her days as an only dog, on the other, she loves company, she seems really 'old' without another dog to bounce off - she is ten, going on eleven, but you wouldn't think so once she gets revved up....
 

Ritch

LE
We had a Ridgeback with Megaesophagus a few years ago, the breeder had us jumping through hoops to be 'approved' - most of which would be against DPA now, the husband was a court usher and was (apparently) using his position to 'vet' potential owners and check identities etc... Anyway, we were offered a pup that had been sold once but returned for some vague reason, we took her on, with some behaviour issues that were due to her living with her parents and having to 'fight' for her food - soon ironed out with the help of our big old boy! long story short, she had problems digesting food, thought to be due to speed eating, turned out to be megaesophagus. Our vet said he had another case of it in a Ridgeback a week or so after Ella was diagnosed with it. Yup, another pup from the same litter. Breeder contacted, no response, KC contacted - 'we suggest you discuss your concerns with the breeder'.... Although we'd had rescues before, that was the point we decided to look for rescues in preference to pups - as much as we'd love to have a few-weeks-old bundle of fun howling and sh*tting everywhere, the reward of rehoming an older dog and seeing them happy, relaxed and enjoying life is reward enough.

I'm hoping to take her out mid-week to see some of her occasional acquaintances in the dog world, just to see how she reacts to friendly noses....
Oddly she's fine with gunfire, thunder and general unexpected noise - it's just fireworks....
Our big old boy, who would shrug off anything and everything that would reduce most dogs to whimpering wrecks, would react really badly to umbrellas of all things!

On one hand, I'm of a mind to let Ruby see out her days as an only dog, on the other, she loves company, she seems really 'old' without another dog to bounce off - she is ten, going on eleven, but you wouldn't think so once she gets revved up....

Mate, if I was in the same position as you now (I was a few years back) - I'd get another dog as company for Ruby.

When Lucy died, my Belgian Malinois Amber grieved big time and was never the same as an only dog. In hindsight it would have been good for her to have someone else. Lucy used to boss Amber round something chronic and I think Amber would have relished the role of bossing around a newbie.

Totally agree with you on the point of rescues. All mine have been rescues and it's so rewarding, giving them a second shot after a shit start to life.
 
Poor old Ruby. We have two dogs in the village, Both one which our two have known since they were pups, but both of which have turned lately. Luckily, in our case, without injury. One case is probably because he's still got his gonads and is being used as a breeding dog. The other, the owners are responsible but the dog (a Tibetan terrier) is a psycho.

Years back I was away with work for a week when the Begum bought a big bone each for our two of the day (a big ginger collie cross and a beagle). The beagle buried his and tried to take the collie's - who was normally a big softie with anything except cats. The collie went straight through his ear; blood everywhere and a severe vet's bill.....
 
 

clothears

War Hero
Here's to a speedy recovery for Ruby.

Our little lady is not herself, she's realized she's and only dog now. Off her food but still loves her walk. We've kept up her routine, but she's missing the big guy.

Well, to be honest we all are. The floor is cleaner than it's been in years, no blowing fur tufts. No cold noses in places they shouldn't be. We still haven't told our youngest son (he always said the Collie was his dog) as he's been at sea the last two weeks. We've all agreed that the Collie died in his sleep. Son wanted us to keep the old boy with us until he comes home in December. We got the look and knew it wasn't going to happen.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
The poor pup's ear
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I feel so sorry for her, I'm not convinced she knows what happened as it was so quick and without warning. She's had a miserable day as the dressing and bandage has been holding her ear in an unnatural position - it has to go back on tonight though, for her own good.
 
Bloody hell!! That's grim!
the good thing is i suppose that dogs care more about smell than looks
(and the extra sympathy treats & hugs :) So squishy!) .
She is a pretty dog all the same
 

Aphra

Old-Salt
The poor pup's ear
View attachment 611760

View attachment 611761

I feel so sorry for her, I'm not convinced she knows what happened as it was so quick and without warning. She's had a miserable day as the dressing and bandage has been holding her ear in an unnatural position - it has to go back on tonight though, for her own good.
Dear me, that's truly horrible. Poor, poor Ruby. She's definitely going to have an interesting scar but what an awful way to get it. She's such a beauty, too. Not that it would matter less if she wasn't of course.

Is she letting you tend to it ok? It's amazing how quickly they heal compared to humans but I imagine there's still a long recovery ahead, bless her.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
Bloody hell!! That's grim!
the good thing is i suppose that dogs care more about smell than looks
(and the extra sympathy treats & hugs :) So squishy!) .
She is a pretty dog all the same
Yer, she's always been a looker
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