ARRSE Kennel Club - A Dog Owners Thread

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
To cheer you up
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Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
They're adorable. I have an 11 week old Lab at home that I'm yet to meet. Apparently she's like an Exocet with teeth!
Luckily these don't move much at present. I suspect it's going to get a bit crazy in a couple of weeks' time.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Looks like they fitted together neat & tidy, then a couple went a bit off piste; was it the dark brown wriggler or Purple Collar that demonstrated admirable eccentricity sleeping on mum's back?
(they are all beautiful!)
Green collar, Douglas, sleeping on Mum's back. He has already earned his nickname Dopey Douglas.

The do make me laugh, none of this tidy lining up and latching on at right angles to mother's belly. They will lie alongside, on top of, over and under each other. The tiniest, Skye, looks to have incredibly sharp elbows when battling for position!
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
FFS They are Puppies not babies. Very cute Puppies but puppies never the less.
He is American, cut him some slack...
 
This is mine, taken at the age of about 8 weeks (she's about 20 months old now, but not much bigger!). Her dam's a Bichon, and her sire's a Chihuahua/Shitzu cross. Her name's Myra*.

myra.jpg


* Yes, I named my puppy after Myra Hindley. She's a bitch and she buries things where no-one ever finds them. It really winds up some of my more sensitive friends.
 
This is mine, taken at the age of about 8 weeks (she's about 20 months old now, but not much bigger!). Her dam's a Bichon, and her sire's a Chihuahua/Shitzu cross. Her name's Myra*.

View attachment 542939

* Yes, I named my puppy after Myra Hindley. She's a bitch and she buries things where no-one ever finds them. It really winds up some of my more sensitive friends.
Good name. A Royal Marine once attached to my unit had a lovely little beast which he called 'Clyt' (short for 'Clytemnestra', or so he said). The other occupants of a hotel bar where we held a large post-op de-adrenalin meet were outraged, but he was learned in Greek mythology, and explained in full as she scuttled around their legs and had to be repeatedly called to heel.
 
Good name. A Royal Marine once attached to my unit had a lovely little beast which he called 'Clyt' (short for 'Clytemnestra', or so he said). The other occupants of a hotel bar where we held a large post-op de-adrenalin meet were outraged, but he was learned in Greek mythology, and explained in full as she scuttled around their legs and had to be repeatedly called to heel.
I do like that. Although, of course, "Clytemnestra" is pronounced with the "y" as an "ay" sound, so "Clyt" would be more properly pronounced as "Clayte" rather than "Clit". And some people mock the benefits of a classical education...

As an aside, I have a friend who used to have a dog called "Onan" (this was many years before Terry Pratchett wrote "Dodger" btw). He told me that the only people who understood what he was shouting as he walked around the playing field never got offended, as they were learned enough to understand the joke.
 
I do like that. Although, of course, "Clytemnestra" is pronounced with the "y" as an "ay" sound, so "Clyt" would be more properly pronounced as "Clayte" rather than "Clit". And some people mock the benefits of a classical education...

As an aside, I have a friend who used to have a dog called "Onan" (this was many years before Terry Pratchett wrote "Dodger" btw). He told me that the only people who understood what he was shouting as he walked around the playing field never got offended, as they were learned enough to understand the joke.
If this were the Times 'comments' sections, I would blow great winds about the proper pronunciations of words in ancient languages, but it's 'dogs' on 'Arrse', so won't. Huff. Puff.
 
If this were the Times 'comments' sections, I would blow great winds about the proper pronunciations of words in ancient languages, but it's 'dogs' on 'Arrse', so won't. Huff. PufHarumph
Harumpph
 
I do like that. Although, of course, "Clytemnestra" is pronounced with the "y" as an "ay" sound, so "Clyt" would be more properly pronounced as "Clayte" rather than "Clit".
I was taught that ypsilon represented a sound more like 'u mit umlaut' in German, becoming /i:/ in Byzantine Greek. I tend to the former (Attic) pronunciation when reading Koine, for clarity.
 
I was taught that ypsilon represented a sound more like 'u mit umlaut' in German, becoming /i:/ in Byzantine Greek. I tend to the former (Attic) pronunciation when reading Koine, for clarity.
I will, of course, bow to anyone with a more extensive knowledge of the subject. My classical education consisted of three years of Attic Greek and Latin, and was a great many years ago. In fact, I haven't had to speak (modern) Greek in anger for about 30 years, and my vocabulary has probably atrophied to the extent where I would spend my time saying "δεν μιλάω ελληνικά - μιλάς αγγλικά" very loudly and slowly to anyone who spoke to me.

Of course, I still retain the ability to order beer. That's a basic survival necessity - no matter what the language!
 
I will, of course, bow to anyone with a more extensive knowledge of the subject. My classical education consisted of three years of Attic Greek and Latin, and was a great many years ago. In fact, I haven't had to speak (modern) Greek in anger for about 30 years, and my vocabulary has probably atrophied to the extent where I would spend my time saying "δεν μιλάω ελληνικά - μιλάς αγγλικά" very loudly and slowly to anyone who spoke to me.

Of course, I still retain the ability to order beer. That's a basic survival necessity - no matter what the language!
Oddly enough, ordering a beer is all I can do in Modern Greek or Hebrew.

Caveat remains that my Greek experience is mostly Koine, with some exposure to Neo Attic and glances at Doric and Homeric, though I did explore some avenues of Greek linguistics.

There are often several schools of pronunciation in any ancient language:

Modern, such as Italianate Latin. In Greek, more or less Byzantine, generally agreed to where the modern pronunciation began.

Reconstructed classical, which can change. Currently being argued about in the Latin community. It turns out that the Augustinian school beloved of me and FiL is not Roman, but that of Celtic Monks. So I'm keeping it.

Local, such as English school, which I've heard in Latin and Greek.
No. Just... No.

I ought, it seems, to have adopted the Byzantine scheme, but preferred the Reconstructed classical, even as far as pronouncing eta as /e:/ (vs./e:j/) and sounding iota subscript.
It helped with spelling, but I would have sounded like a touring Athenian snob in 1st Century Jerusalem!
 

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