ARRSE Kennel Club - A Dog Owners Thread

Question for the UK-based dogowners...

SWMBO has always wanted a dog, and we've now spent five months getting used to another member of the family (a golden labrador/retriever bitch, who has turned out to have a truly lovely temperament)...

...SWMBO has always felt that keeping dogs indoors is unfair, and so the last few weekends have been spent assembling/building a dog run in the back garden, so that the Kartoffelnhund* can have the benefit of fresh air, and the opportunity to bark at the local pigeon and squirrel population when we're out of the house :) We've finished the run, and I've been tasked with building the kennel (doghouse for JJH) to my beloved's design and specification. It's going to be well-insulated** (the better to keep it cool in summer, and warm in spring/autumn)

Any advice on the care and maintenance of an insulated kennel?


* She discovered potatoes in the garden. Dug them up and ate them. Can no longer be fully trusted near soft earth, as she has learned that it may contain either food, or sticks to chew...

** I'm an (over)engineer. Given the diktat design requirements of "OSB3 12mm and 50mm Kingspan", this thing is going to weigh a ton a hundred kilos or so. Still, it should withstand Richter 8 earthquake or Force 12 Gale. Or both. And it was an excuse to buy moar toolz (mitre saw, and a new power drill to replace my 25-year-old Black&Decker that I finally burned out while drilling 10mm holes into concrete)
 
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Question for the UK-based dogowners...

SWMBO has always wanted a dog, and we've now spent five months getting used to another member of the family (a golden labrador/retriever bitch, who has turned out to have a truly lovely temperament)...

...SWMBO has always felt that keeping dogs indoors is unfair, and so the last few weekends have been spent assembling/building a dog run in the back garden, so that the Kartoffelnhund* can have the benefit of fresh air, and the opportunity to bark at the local pigeon and squirrel population when we're out of the house :) We've finished the run, and I've been tasked with building the kennel (doghouse for JJH) to my beloved's design and specification. It's going to be well-insulated** (the better to keep it cool in summer, and warm in spring/autumn)

Any advice on the care and maintenance of an insulated kennel?
Why not take the "golden labrador/retriever bitch", with you?

They need (human) company, as much as we appreciate their company.

"Maintenance" . . . I suppose a seasonal, good wash-out and dry. Frequent wash of the/her bedding. Occassional liberal "dusting" of anti-flee powder.
 
Question for the UK-based dogowners...

SWMBO has always wanted a dog, and we've now spent five months getting used to another member of the family (a golden labrador/retriever bitch, who has turned out to have a truly lovely temperament)...

...SWMBO has always felt that keeping dogs indoors is unfair, and so the last few weekends have been spent assembling/building a dog run in the back garden, so that the Kartoffelnhund* can have the benefit of fresh air, and the opportunity to bark at the local pigeon and squirrel population when we're out of the house :) We've finished the run, and I've been tasked with building the kennel (doghouse for JJH) to my beloved's design and specification. It's going to be well-insulated** (the better to keep it cool in summer, and warm in spring/autumn)

Any advice on the care and maintenance of an insulated kennel?


* She discovered potatoes in the garden. Dug them up and ate them. Can no longer be fully trusted near soft earth, as she has learned that it may contain either food, or sticks to chew...

** I'm an (over)engineer. Given the diktat design requirements of "OSB3 12mm and 50mm Kingspan", this thing is going to weigh a ton a hundred kilos or so. Still, it should withstand Richter 8 earthquake or Force 12 Gale. Or both. And it was an excuse to buy moar toolz (mitre saw, and a new power drill to replace my 25-year-old Black&Decker that I finally burned out while drilling 10mm holes into concrete)
Sounds like nice quarters but remember it is very easy to let "life" get in the way and an outside dog ends up bored and ignored. That happened with our first dog decades ago before we realized how brief is their life with us and how much we missed as a result.
 
Hound will do better around family both indoors and outdoors. You're the only pack they have and they get stressed being away from their pack.
 
Question for the UK-based dogowners...

SWMBO has always wanted a dog, and we've now spent five months getting used to another member of the family (a golden labrador/retriever bitch, who has turned out to have a truly lovely temperament)...

...SWMBO has always felt that keeping dogs indoors is unfair, and so the last few weekends have been spent assembling/building a dog run in the back garden, so that the Kartoffelnhund* can have the benefit of fresh air, and the opportunity to bark at the local pigeon and squirrel population when we're out of the house :) We've finished the run, and I've been tasked with building the kennel (doghouse for JJH) to my beloved's design and specification. It's going to be well-insulated** (the better to keep it cool in summer, and warm in spring/autumn)

Any advice on the care and maintenance of an insulated kennel?


* She discovered potatoes in the garden. Dug them up and ate them. Can no longer be fully trusted near soft earth, as she has learned that it may contain either food, or sticks to chew...

** I'm an (over)engineer. Given the diktat design requirements of "OSB3 12mm and 50mm Kingspan", this thing is going to weigh a ton a hundred kilos or so. Still, it should withstand Richter 8 earthquake or Force 12 Gale. Or both. And it was an excuse to buy moar toolz (mitre saw, and a new power drill to replace my 25-year-old Black&Decker that I finally burned out while drilling 10mm holes into concrete)
By the sound of it, don't forget the jacuzzi and the aircon...:)

Seriously though, I built something similar for my first Lab, as it took the longest time to get him housetrained and stop him chewing on books*. Leaving him in the run meant we didn't have to worry about coming home to a dog turd minefield.

Both my current dogs are much better, but I don't like leaving them indoors alone for more than 6 hours, especially as they get older. I think I'd use a run if I had to leave them for longer periods and I couldn't get someone they know** to let them out to ease springs occasionally.


* I think he might have been a para in a previous life...

** the Lab's a tart (see Post #20,898 above) but the land shark is still a piece of orange tarmac, even though she's 11 this year.
 
Have to agree with the general view of why have a dog if you don't have it around you as much as possible? The more a dog's around you, the more he learns about how to be around you and the easier (and more fun) it is to have him around you. Not only is it the easiest way to train a dog but you'll miss out on a great deal if you go another way.

When not jumping into rivers and tearing round the countryside covered in mud, the proper place for man's best friend is next to you, on the sofa, in front of a roaring fire. If I tried quartering either of my spaniels in the garden, I'd get some very old-fashioned looks, and deservedly so. They're better behaved than my children.
 
Have to agree with the general view of why have a dog if you don't have it around you as much as possible?
Damn right. It's why we never had a dog before now - we wouldn't have been able to spend enough time with her. She goes nearly everywhere with us; lives in the house, and one of us is almost always with her. She's brilliant, and we love her to bits.

This is just so that on the few occasions during the week when both the kids are at school, and neither of us is able to work from home, then she's not trapped in the house getting bored...
 
Damn right. It's why we never had a dog before now - we wouldn't have been able to spend enough time with her. She goes nearly everywhere with us; lives in the house, and one of us is almost always with her. She's brilliant, and we love her to bits.

This is just so that on the few occasions during the week when both the kids are at school, and neither of us is able to work from home, then she's not trapped in the house getting bored...
I don't know what it's like where you are but down my way are old folks who'll daysit- generally former owners who don't think they'll live long enough for a full dog cycle - I've only heard good things from my doggy circle about these folk.
 
Damn right. It's why we never had a dog before now - we wouldn't have been able to spend enough time with her. She goes nearly everywhere with us; lives in the house, and one of us is almost always with her. She's brilliant, and we love her to bits.

This is just so that on the few occasions during the week when both the kids are at school, and neither of us is able to work from home, then she's not trapped in the house getting bored...
So glad you have her--'sounds like a wonderful home for her.
 
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Hopefully, others will "Sign & Share" . . .

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(Also posted on the puddy-cat thread).

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Done for both petitions.

It is really sickening how many species at risk are targeted for "traditional asian medicine"
Medicine my arse, it is total quackery. The Chinese are decimating the African pangolin (odd scaly mammal) population as ground up scales are claimed to cure erectile disfunction. I cannot understand why the asians believe this nonsense.

Back in 1998 my wife, son and I visited Kenya and Tanzania to see wildlife. I recall our guide telling us about poaching problems but he said the then new drug, Viagra, would eliminate poaching as there was a medicine that would actually work. The problem in Africa was the belief in the middle east that ground rhino horn cures erectile disfunction. Poaching still continues.

It seems that the belief in Asia and the Middle East is that the more endangered a species is, the more powerful the medicinal properties.
 
Sounds like nice quarters but remember it is very easy to let "life" get in the way and an outside dog ends up bored and ignored. That happened with our first dog decades ago before we realized how brief is their life with us and how much we missed as a result.
JJH -
Dogs do learn to compensate for reduced attention. The family across from my driveway have a pair of beautiful 2 year old goldens, littermates. They are much loved by the family but the dad works, the mum works part time as a visiting nurse, the oldest boy works now (plays hockey in the NHL), the two younger boys are off at university (and playing hockey) . They stay outside a lot, not penned but trained to stay in the yard.

When I come out my door and head for my driveway the dogs get up, tail wagging commences, as they know I will come over and play. They then rummage under bushes and run to drop a hockey puck, slimy tennis ball or stick (usually a hockey puck) at my feet for a bit of fetch. The dogs seem to believe that they are training me to play a fetch game.
 
JJH -
Dogs do learn to compensate for reduced attention. The family across from my driveway have a pair of beautiful 2 year old goldens, littermates. They are much loved by the family but the dad works, the mum works part time as a visiting nurse, the oldest boy works now (plays hockey in the NHL), the two younger boys are off at university (and playing hockey) . They stay outside a lot, not penned but trained to stay in the yard.

When I come out my door and head for my driveway the dogs get up, tail wagging commences, as they know I will come over and play. They then rummage under bushes and run to drop a hockey puck, slimy tennis ball or stick (usually a hockey puck) at my feet for a bit of fetch. The dogs seem to believe that they are training me to play a fetch game.
I admit to being very sensitive on this due to what I see all around me here---forlorn pitiable creatures tied to a stake or tree with a rut worn in the ground from pacing in their outdoor prison in all sorts of weather and often without even any water.
 
I admit to being very sensitive on this due to what I see all around me here---forlorn pitiable creatures tied to a stake or tree with a rut worn in the ground from pacing in their outdoor prison in all sorts of weather and often without even any water.
I stayed in a local farm when I first deployed to Bosnia in 1994. The house had a mangy mutt who lived exactly how you described. I always sneaked extra food to her, and then found that the Finn who also stayed in the same farm was doing the same. She got so excited whenever she saw us.

One morning she was really pleased to show off her new pups. Unfortunately one by one they all died. She was bereft when she lost the last one.

Sorry I need to stop and close my windows, it's suddenly got all dusty in here...
 
Lunar the Chihuahua and Fizzgig the Affenpinscher:
DVNI8816.JPG
 
I stayed in a local farm when I first deployed to Bosnia in 1994. The house had a mangy mutt who lived exactly how you described. I always sneaked extra food to her, and then found that the Finn who also stayed in the same farm was doing the same. She got so excited whenever she saw us.

One morning she was really pleased to show off her new pups. Unfortunately one by one they all died. She was bereft when she lost the last one.

Sorry I need to stop and close my windows, it's suddenly got all dusty in here...
I understand your feeling on this. My worst moments when recollecting my time in combat are when my internal defenses fail me and I get images of the poor animals caught up in the killing and destruction. I have often puzzled over this phenomenon whereby I am more upset over these images than I am over those of people involved in similar horrible situations.

I used to feel guilty over it but I have reconciled these feelings over the decades since, to paraphrase a modern saying, they "are what they are" and I cannot change them. Yet another reminder that horrors of war, that no human ought to experience, profoundly affect and change each of us uniquely in both degree and kind.
 

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