Arnhem

Arnhem

untallguy

Old-Salt
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untallguy submitted a new resource:

Arnhem - A new history of Operation Market Garden

This is (another) history of Operation Market Garden, the failed (and, as the author explains, doomed) attempt to cross the Rhine in late 1944. Antony Beevor goes into great depth and breadth to bring the story alive.

Much as I am a fan of Beevor, I have to say that this book did not add much more to the history of the fighting in Arnhem and the wider Market Garden area. He does a good job of telling the story and bringing alive, from every angle, the savagery, bravery, occasional...
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Living near Arnhem now, I found the most interesting book about the battle for Arnhem was 'It Never Snows in September' by Robert Kershaw. It gives a view of the German reactions to Market-Garden, and the massive improvisations needed to form what appeared to the Allies to be a series of defensive lines, all over the place.

By way of tourist information . . . The Museum at Oosterbeek has recently been refurbished yet again, though I have only rushed round the new bits so far (g/f in tow). An information folder, and map, for the 'Perimeter Walk', round the edges of the positions held North of the river, is available at the Museum. Near the bridge, there is now a newish mini-Museum on the waterfront that I hope to visit soon. In a few weeks (on 1st.September) the commemorative walk around the DZs takes place, then a couple of weeks after that (22nd.September) the mass drops (assorted NATO aircraft and troops, the program runs all day) on the DZ at Ginkelse Heide.

Links:
Airborne March (get to the start via the train station at Oosterbeek)

Oosterbeek Museum

Ginkelse Heide (bus transport provided from Ede-Wageningen train station)
 

Seadog

ADC
I bought and read it. Among my gripes is the description of General Bittrich is almost word for word from ABTF, right down to repeating the ‘talented musician’ error which Bittrich corrected in interview with Cornelius Ryan in the 70s who included the correction in ABTF. Sloppy.

Ranks of the key German officers are all over the place, mostly inflated as contemporary photos show.

Overall it adds little new. ABTF and INSIS have the subject covered. Having said that, Colonel Frost’s ‘A Drop Too Many’ comes recommended.
 
Last edited:

4(T)

LE
One of my favourite Arnhem sources is Louis Hagen's "Arnhem Lift"


The interesting aspect that Hagen brings is that he was in fact a native German Jew - fled to UK, interned, recruited into the Army, transferred to Glider Pilots. During the battle, he could hear and understand the enemy talking. Consequently he has some insightful opinions about the quality of the enemy, and the overall viability of the Arnhem part of the operation.
 
D

Deleted 145301

Guest
Not a book, and I'm not sure about this chaps credentials. Yet an interesting video with excellent mapping overview of market garden.


Unlike Beevor who blames Boy Browning for the lions share of feck up, the video maker reaches the conclusion that the biggest mistake was made by Brig Gen Gavin GOC of the 82nd who concentrated his forces on holding the Groosbeek Heights.

Apparently Gavin was convinced that 1000 tanks were likely to come rumbling out of the Reichswald. Based on what int, who knows.

He therefore sent a single company initially on September 17th to take the Waal bridge, his main objective, and by the time he committed significant infantry to the task the Germans were defending the bridge in force.

This led to the delays and suicidally brave river crossing performed by 3/504 and thus the delay sealed 1st AB Divs fate.

I've certainly read and heard mixed reviews for Beevors take.
 
Living near Arnhem now, I found the most interesting book about the battle for Arnhem was 'It Never Snows in September' by Robert Kershaw. It gives a view of the German reactions to Market-Garden, and the massive improvisations needed to form what appeared to the Allies to be a series of defensive lines, all over the place.

By way of tourist information . . . The Museum at Oosterbeek has recently been refurbished yet again, though I have only rushed round the new bits so far (g/f in tow). An information folder, and map, for the 'Perimeter Walk', round the edges of the positions held North of the river, is available at the Museum. Near the bridge, there is now a newish mini-Museum on the waterfront that I hope to visit soon. In a few weeks (on 1st.September) the commemorative walk around the DZs takes place, then a couple of weeks after that (22nd.September) the mass drops (assorted NATO aircraft and troops, the program runs all day) on the DZ at Ginkelse Heide.

Links:
Airborne March (get to the start via the train station at Oosterbeek)

Oosterbeek Museum

Ginkelse Heide (bus transport provided from Ede-Wageningen train station)
Re. Kershaw, he has also written a very good history of the early years of the German war in Russia. It's called' War Without Garlands' and, if you are not already aware of it, is recommended.
 

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