Army WO3s and RAF WO1s

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No, there's no such suspension, at least in my time. If you've still got your copy of 'Bridging the Gap' you can check in Chapter 12 (Second Edition, Code No 63695, but I'm sure yours must be a later version) 'Liability After Leaving the Regular Army', Para 13 - Emigration: ..."This is because your legal liability for service does not cease simply because you are overseas. However, no action is taken to recall individuals except in the case of those in Germany and the Low Countries who are expected to report for duty."

The options were either to inform MS6 at Stanmore (no 'Glasgow') or the DA at the Embassy. It's also in the AB592A and B.

Things may have changed, but at that time there was absolutely no formal suspension just because you were 'overseas' and the commitment was ongoing unless you had it waived for medical reasons, or joined the TA / ADF, etc. Just being 'overseas' made no difference, except in practice only those in the UK, Germany or the Low Countries were ever recalled.
Yes there is - your Army pension can be stopped!
It must have changed. I received a letter suspending my reserve liability when I first moved overseas (which was not to Australia). When I applied to join the ADF I received a letter canceling my liability.

No they can’t stop paying your pension. It’s a pension, not pay.
 
No, there's no such suspension, at least in my time. If you've still got your copy of 'Bridging the Gap' you can check in Chapter 12 (Second Edition, Code No 63695, but I'm sure yours must be a later version) 'Liability After Leaving the Regular Army', Para 13 - Emigration: ..."This is because your legal liability for service does not cease simply because you are overseas. However, no action is taken to recall individuals except in the case of those in Germany and the Low Countries who are expected to report for duty."

The options were either to inform MS6 at Stanmore (no 'Glasgow') or the DA at the Embassy. It's also in the AB592A and B.

Things may have changed, but at that time there was absolutely no formal suspension just because you were 'overseas' and the commitment was ongoing unless you had it waived for medical reasons, or joined the TA / ADF, etc. Just being 'overseas' made no difference, except in practice only those in the UK, Germany or the Low Countries were ever recalled.
Yes there is - your Army pension can be stopped!
It must have changed. I received a letter suspending my reserve liability when I first moved overseas (which was not to Australia) until such time as I became resident in the UK again. When I applied to join the ADF I received a letter rescinding my liability; you can’t practically have a reserve liability to two countries.

And no, they can’t stop paying your pension. It’s a pension, not pay for being on the RARO.
 
I’m quite sure that I crossed paths with JG and one of his peers from the Queens who went on to be a 2*. I think folk like us are from a different era with a different outlook. I don’t always agree with JG but he makes some good points.
You must remember John, surely?

Large, well built gentlemen with muscular thighs.

He did a lot of cycling.

Very talkative.

Normally buried balls deep in a male youths.
 
I believe that pensions only stop being paid on death. They even get paid if you are banged up in a cell doing a 10 year stretch.
Forfeiture of pension used to be a punishment available to Courts Martial for relatively trivial offences. There was a well publicised case of a senior LE who crashed a military car and got someone to cover for him who lost 30 plus years of pension......

But when it became possible to opt out and take the pay instead (90 ish?), it became effectively contributory. Since then it’s been near impossible to forfeit and certainly not for refusing to return from overseas for a call up.

A core issue would be court jurisdiction. Failure to report is, IIRC, a criminal offence, not a military one.
 
Forfeiture of pension used to be a punishment available to Courts Martial for relatively trivial offences. There was a well publicised case of a senior LE who crashed a military car and got someone to cover for him who lost 30 plus years of pension......
Sorry Bob, perhaps I wasn't clear. I was referring to a pension that was already being paid.

But when it became possible to opt out and take the pay instead (90 ish?),
Never heard of it. I can recall around 2000 the restriction was lifted on being able to source a private pension but do not recall anything about opting out of Army pension.

AFP 75 rules forbid having a private pension.
 

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No, as 'John'. That's why, despite Thai custom, they called me ... "John" (actually 'Khun John', or 'Mr John').
Is it just me that thinks the word in bold is mis-spelt?
 
Which part of this didn't you understand: They had to at somebody's as they were paid to, by the estate - if they didn't log in and it wasn't witnessed they weren't paid. If I wasn't there they tok it to the next house to witness.

It's a perfectly normal, routine, well-known system on gated estates, even in the West.
No, in the West it's generally accepted that the Police do what they are paid to by the citizens, and don't moonlight as a PSC on a private estate.
 
No, in the West it's generally accepted that the Police do what they are paid to by the citizens, and don't moonlight as a PSC on a private estate.
Unfortunately that's not true in SE Asia.

But the story still sounds a bit too complicated to me. I think it went like this...

Thai police arrest young Brits for getting into an argument with a working girl.

Guys are drunk and are talking themselves into a court appearance and jail time.

Police aren't interested in the paperwork. Call a tame expat they know cos they moonlight near his gaff.

Said expat rocks up. Tells young lads that they should pay the cash if they want to avoid jail time.

Sounds much more believable.

Job jobbed.
 
Sorry Bob, perhaps I wasn't clear. I was referring to a pension that was already being paid.



Never heard of it. I can recall around 2000 the restriction was lifted on being able to source a private pension but do not recall anything about opting out of Army pension.

AFP 75 rules forbid having a private pension.
Doesn’t make much difference to the point; John couldn’t have lost his pension for failing to report his address.

A bling guess; the change in accounting for pension contributions came in about 96. Until then, they weren’t shown on a payslip. There was some change in law (might have been European) which made compulsory membership of a pension illegal.

I doubt anyone opted out. If they did, the contributions would have been taxable unless invested in a private scheme. Point being anyone who opened out was no longer in AFPS75.
 
Doesn’t make much difference to the point; John couldn’t have lost his pension for failing to report his address.
Agreed. Which is why I gave the 10 year stint in jail as an example.

A bling guess; the change in accounting for pension contributions came in about 96. Until then, they weren’t shown on a payslip.
Sometime after that Bob. I retired in 2001 and there was no pension contributions on any of my payslips.

I doubt anyone opted out. If they did, the contributions would have been taxable unless invested in a private scheme. Point being anyone who opened out was no longer in AFPS75.
Perhaps a question for the Pension Society, but I dont think anyone could opt out of AFP 75.
 
No, as 'John'. That's why, despite Thai custom, they called me ... "John" (actually 'Khun John', or 'Mr John'). They hadn't. She told me she hadn't consented and had told them not to. They all told me she hadn't consented and had told them not to.

What more "information" do you think was needed?
What assumption?
What judgement? What sentence?
They couldn't be charged and weren't. The victim refused to make a complaint and they never confessed to the police. They were under no compulsion to pay so there was no possible extortion, and they'd confirmed exactly what the bar-girl said.

Rather like all the open source reports and vids on Milan, they could of course all have been lying and it was yet another conspiracy.
We’re you in uniform John? Dug out an old service dress, all the bling, rack that would shame a Remembrance Day Walt, crowns and stars galore, more braid than a South American Generalisimo?
 
well, I think we're the same generation ( I commissioned in Dec 77). I think you speak a lot of sense, I guess we're just from a different era?
Same generation / era certainly (Apr 77).

FWIW the 'in' joke was as a result of NITAT saying in the debrief at the end of Day 1 that the Coy wasn't being aggressive enough in our attitude to Civpop, for which I took full responsibility as they were only doing what I'd told them.

After the debrief, when it was my turn, I told the Coy 'if that's what they want, that's what they'll get, gloves off' and as they thought I'd personally been too much of Mr Nice Guy letting one of the NITAT staff shout in my face I swopped my escort bricks around so that it wouldn't happen again. It didn't.

After day 2 it was all smiles and "Didn't they do well", etc. TBH I didn't agree at all as my experience from handing over to a bn that was far more openly aggressive to the locals in just their first week than we'd been all tour was that all it got you was far less low level int and far more own casualties, but that was what they wanted so that was what they got.
 
No they can’t stop paying your pension. It’s a pension, not pay.
Doesn’t make much difference to the point; John couldn’t have lost his pension for failing to report his address.
Yes and no.

Have you never received one of those letters from SPVA /Vets UK that you have to sign and have witnessed to say that your details are correct / you're still alive?

If you don't return it your pension stops; if you're not at the right address you don't get the letter, so you can't return it, so your pension stops.

Edit: before we start going round in circles, bob, I've no idea how the rule could be enforced or not, or if you could have a pile of those on the RARO list running off to Marbella and thumbing their noses. All I know is that was the rule and it couldn't be spelt out more clearly. No idea if / when it changed either.
 
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Have you never received one of those letters from SPVA /Vets UK that you have to sign and have witnessed to say that your details are correct / you're still alive?

If you don't return it your pension stops; if you're not at the right address you don't get the letter, so you can't return it, so your pension stops.
It is called a '' Proof of Life '' certificate, it applies to all pensions, not just Military Pensions.

And is nothing to do with anything else on this thread about Army pensions being stopped.
 
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