Army Veterans Facing murder charges over Bloody Sunday within two weeks

Well stop posting it then.
I did think of posting "Id stand with the 13 but they are dead", just to see who gets arsey.
 
This is from memory so no notes etc.
Doing A level Geography essay on the Sunday I took a break to watch the bbc news at 1 o'clock with a coffee.
Half way through they went to IP giving his sermon where he said' , I would like to thank those loyal servants of the Crown over here in our hour of need but some are not loyal enough and one will pay the price for his lack of loyalty'.
In the following week the first soldier killed in the troubles was shot.
History A level next Sunday but the same scenario but this time IP says, 'a loyal servant of the crown paid the price this week for his lack of loyalty. I hope the other loyal servants will take heed'.
No proof of course.
First soldier killed during the Troubles/Op banner was Trooper Hugh McAbe who was shot by the RUC (poss B Specials) at Divis on the Falls Road on the night of 14-15 August 1969. He was buried with full military honours.
 
I'll take that to mean you haven't done any research into actual figures.

Does the death of other soldiers excuse the - alleged - actions of Para F (given that most or all of those will have happened after BS and maybe becuase of BS?). Just trying to understand your logic.
Not playing
 
Well you learn something new everyday!
It, in turn, was taken from the UN Universal Declaration of Rights. The term was introduced to the US in Saigon by Mr Robert Thompson, who headed the largely-covert British Military Mission , c 1961. There was a regular stream of senior US visitors to Malaya to see how the British (and Commonwealth) defeated the Communist insurgency. However, the conditions in Malaya and Singapore were vastly different than in Malaya. The CTs in Malaya received very little external political, financial or military support from Russia or China, unlike the VC and NVA. The British approach in Malaya was police-led - the terrorists had committed 'civilian' criminal offences; at no stage did it become a war - it remained, for a variety of reasons, an Emergency.
 
unless "malice aforethought" can be proven, it's case dismissed surely?
So, the guy goes around firing upon people, then comes back and tells a cock and bull story, about when, where, at whom, and why.

And then he gets the good news about the forensics showing that his story so far is indeed cock and bull.

And he subsequently rewrites this story multiple times.

Here's a thing: If he'd no malice aforethought . . . why couldn't he speak the plain unvarnished truth on the very first occasion he was asked to explain how he had assiduously discharged his professional duties under Crown law on that day?
 
When you could/couldn't fire at vehicles still wasn't that clear at the time of the Clegg incident
I see.

Somehow it became less clear in the ten intervening years between my dit and the Clegg farago..

Fascinating insight to the way people hear only what they want to hear.

It was crystal fvcking clear in 1980, to anyone who paid attention :-D
 
It, in turn, was taken from the UN Universal Declaration of Rights. The term was introduced to the US in Saigon by Mr Robert Thompson, who headed the largely-covert British Military Mission , c 1961. There was a regular stream of senior US visitors to Malaya to see how the British (and Commonwealth) defeated the Communist insurgency. However, the conditions in Malaya and Singapore were vastly different than in Malaya. The CTs in Malaya received very little external political, financial or military support from Russia or China, unlike the VC and NVA. The British approach in Malaya was police-led - the terrorists had committed 'civilian' criminal offences; at no stage did it become a war - it remained, for a variety of reasons, an Emergency.
Moreover, the CI were not generally indigeneous Malays, but were of Chinese extraction and became increasingly isolated in the jungle while Malay villiges were relocated to secure economically sustainable areas. Vietnam on the other hand was less ethnically diverse and the communist insurgents had many years experience of combat against first, the Japanese, then the British, then tFrench and ultimately the Americans. Thompsons Malay style hearts and minds model was only briefly attempted before being rejected by ghe Americans.
 
I thought it was “Softly softly”.

Hearts and minds goes back to Vietnam.

And If you grab them by the balls their hearts and minds will follow.
Problem is you grab them by the pussy hence the opposite effect.
 
Moreover, the CI were not generally indigeneous Malays, but were of Chinese extraction and became increasingly isolated in the jungle while Malay villiges were relocated to secure economically sustainable areas. Vietnam on the other hand was less ethnically diverse and the communist insurgents had many years experience of combat against first, the Japanese, then the British, then tFrench and ultimately the Americans. Thompsons Malay style hearts and minds model was only briefly attempted before being rejected by ghe Americans.
One of the initial disadvantages the colonial authorities faced when the emergency broke out was a lack of ethnic Chinese policeman, and in particular, special branch detectives who spoke and understood the Chinese populace. As it happened, quite a few British officers were trained at a language school funded by the US State Department, up in the Cameron Highlands. I interviewed some years ago several ethnic Chinese officers who had been trained in Britain by MI5, on counterintelligence subjects.

As you rightly point out, overwhelmingly the CTs were ethnic Chinese. The Chinese constituted 38% of the population but under the Malay rulers, they had very few rights. This formented the rebellion.

In Britain, the assumption is that the British Army won the campaign and defeated the Communist terrorists. This is a distortion of history. Some battalions would do two years on duty without a single contact; three times as many police officers were killed during the emergency compare with military deaths. I’ve written quite a bit about the intelligence aspect of the campaign; indeed, many of the HUMINT techniques used to day were tried and tested in Malaya. It was the first campaign where PsyOps played a significant, indeed overwhelming role, in defeating the insurgency.

ETA: Whereas this is a classic 'Crash' thread drift, I would add that early field intelligence operations of both the RUC and the British Army in NI were heavily influenced by operators who'd cut their teeth on the peninsula.
 
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