Army Veterans Facing murder charges over Bloody Sunday within two weeks

No problem.
I am slighly curious as to why you initially replied but it is not important.
Either that or we are talking at cross purposes.
To change the subject I found the ,'SAS Operation Storm, fascinating but one question.
The book describes the war as secret but I seem to recall a (Panorama) documentary on it about 1970 in which the 'colonel' of the SAS in Oman was interviewed.
John Akehurst's "We Won a War" is an excellent account.
 
John Akehurst's "We Won a War" is an excellent account.
I particularly liked the way he attributed winning the war, in part, to intelligence.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
No problem.
I am slighly curious as to why you initially replied but it is not important.
Either that or we are talking at cross purposes.
To change the subject I found the ,'SAS Operation Storm, fascinating but one question.
The book describes the war as secret but I seem to recall a (Panorama) documentary on it about 1970 in which the 'colonel' of the SAS in Oman was interviewed.
I'm also slightly curious to know who or what you were referring to, as I've searched back and I can't find any post of yours which AL refers to. Not that's it any of my business, just a post seems to be missing?
 
I particularly liked the way he attributed winning the war, in part, to intelligence.
I believe he used a fair degree of his own in recognizing the significance of the unique topography of the battlefield to the conduct of operations. But he also includes anecdotes about some of those further down the chain of command which humanize the book - I am thinking particularly about the late, somewhat 'irregular', Bill Foxton's flying skills and, though I'm not terribly certain, that he may have made some mention of the tragic injuries sustained by the late Tony Fleming (more regular, but not completely in a sense). A first class read.
 
I believe he used a fair degree of his own in recognizing the significance of the unique topography of the battlefield to the conduct of operations. But he also includes anecdotes about some of those further down the chain of command which humanize the book - I am thinking particularly about the late, somewhat 'irregular', Bill Foxton's flying skills and, though I'm not terribly certain, that he may have made some mention of the tragic injuries sustained by the late Tony Fleming (more regular, but not completely in a sense). A first class read.
Tony, was a big lad, a Parachute Regiment badged WO2 A PTI. I was present when he punched an RAF gent in the 101 Club who was being obstreperous . Tony was on his F/Fall course at RAF Abingdon in 1971 (?) when the PTSU RSM raised an issue and as a consequence Tony was sent back back to Depot Para, as it was to be,for a year, in the sin bin

We had a good rapport as we were both PTI's more so as I was a superb sky diver/ instructor ( :) ) He came back to be shot and seriously disabled on a contact retrieved to One Tree Hill (?) in Dofhar.

Carried/ dragged through the forward movement of the patrol he was subsequently placed on the outer body of an armoured vehicle and retrieved to the FST at UAG in the vicinity of RAF Salalah. There followed a considerable time at Stoke Mandeville before, now wheelchair bound he was subsequently sponsored at Cairo University, compliments of Mrs. Sadat to gain a degree in classical Arabic.

At Stoke Mandeville, there were two others from the Op Storm wounded, also wheelchair bound, one of them being the gent who features prominently on here sat on a mound with the L42, photographed by his squadron OC Bruce NIven. Regrettably he passed on in 2019.

Tony had an incredible intellect when it came to it. Initially happy to be just a jock-strap, then took the tumble from WO2 to trooper as was in those times taking a huge pay cut. Mercifully, pay adjustments were to come into play. It was a real bitch, the volume of talented young Sgts / C. Sgts from core infantry units having to take a serious drop in pay when joining their allocated squadron.

That's an aspect of what I know of this soul.
 
No problem.
I am slighly curious as to why you initially replied but it is not important.
Either that or we are talking at cross purposes.
To change the subject I found the ,'SAS Operation Storm, fascinating but one question.
The book describes the war as secret but I seem to recall a (Panorama) documentary on it about 1970 in which the 'colonel' of the SAS in Oman was interviewed.
"Op Storm' had a 'D' notice invoked on it which obliged UK press not to report on it. A sort of 'Gentlemans' Agreement' imposed on the editors of our daily press output. Private Eye slipped through the net by offering a story of some goats being humanly interfered with it seemed, which nearly raised the inference that UK forces were at large in Dofhar.

Around Bradbury Lines, nobody but nobody alluded to Op storm, despite the winter sun tans in the Grapes.

A famous, to become, explorer raised a media interest in the operational zone. If you use the search function, you'll find a few threads on Op Storm and him in particular.
 
No problem.
I am slighly curious as to why you initially replied but it is not important.
Either that or we are talking at cross purposes.
To change the subject I found the ,'SAS Operation Storm, fascinating but one question.
The book describes the war as secret but I seem to recall a (Panorama) documentary on it about 1970 in which the 'colonel' of the SAS in Oman was interviewed.

Could it be this, from 28th December 1972?
 
really stacker? Criminal activities?
that would be the PIRA regarded as having conducted one of the best organised and effective insurgncies in modern history?
remind me again which criminal gangs in recent history ended up with its leadership running a country?
Russian mafia
 
Ahmed the Stabber is comedian kindergarten compared to the old school IRA factions.
The IRA didn’t have to run around taping kitchen knives to its Volunteers mits.
ISIS etc have worked out that unorganized individuals without the support of an underlying organization and resources. They can inflict enough ‘damage‘ with whatever they can obtain. It particularly helps if they can keep their brainwashing quiet to avoid them being grassed up by friends, family and the community.

The IRA, Alan’s Snackbar and extremists of any persuasion may be polictically, ideologically or mentally motivated but that doesn’t legitimise criminal actions. History & the winners decide if someone was a freedom fighter as opposed to just terrorist or criminal - but when the drug dealing and organized crime become the lead as opposed to the ‘struggle’ then it smells criminal
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Phil Shiner's law firm has gone bust

Might be time to get out the worlds smallest violin
Unfortunately, being lawyers, they'll have squirreled away the cash to ensure they keep their personal wealth while owing others £ 6M3.
And they won't have a shred of conscience about running away with other people's money.

Makes them no better than any other common thief.
 

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