Army Urban Myths...

Weren't the Royal Hampshires known as the Tigers as well. I came across some blokes from Tiger Company R Hampshires at Canterbury in 1972 when I was at JLR RE at Dover. They had been reduced to a company in the late sixties, but became a full size battalion soon after when there was an urgent need for Infantry in 1972. Originally they were slated to amalgamate with 1 Glosters in 1969.
Yes, I've always associated 'The Tigers' with the Royal Hampshire Regt, more so than any other regiment.

Here's the Hampshire's entry in Regimental Nicknames and Traditions of the British Army, the first edition of which probably goes back to the end of 19th/beginning of 20th century.
<<
(Depot, Winchester.) (Record Office, Exeter.) The Royal Tiger, superscribed "India." "Blenheim," "Ramillies," "Oudenarde," "Malplaquet," "Dettingen," "Minden," "Toumay," "Barrosa," "Peninsula," "Taku Forts," "Pekin, 1860," "Charasiah," "Kabul, 1879," "Afghanistan, 1878-80," "Burma, 1885-87," "Paardeberg," "South Africa, 1900-02." Uniform, Scarlet. Facings, Yellow. Head-dress, Helmet. Cap, Blue. Regimental March, "The Hampshire." The 37th was the first British Regiment to march across India.
THE HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT
Raised in 1702, and within a year was in Holland, and bore a gallant part in Marlborough's campaigns. Few regiments can show a more eventful record of service during the whole of its career, and it has won fame in all parts of the world. The 37th is one of the six British infantry regiments which fought at the battle of Minden, 1st August, 1759; still commemorated in the regiment by the wearing of roses on the anniversary. The 2nd Battalion (67th Foot) was raised in 1756 and after arduous service in the West Indies, the Peninsula, and elsewhere it went to India, where it served for twenty-one years and bore a distinguished part in the capture, after a siege of eleven days, of the fortress of Asseerghur, regarded as the Gibraltar of the East. For its gallantry in India the crest of the Royal Tiger was bestowed. In subsequent service in the East the 67th took part in the attack on the Taku Forts, where four Victoria Crosses were won by Hampshire men. Nickname: "The Hampshire Tigers."
>>

The same publication gives the Leicestershire's nick-name as 'The Bengal Tigers'

Link Regimental Nicknames and Traditions of the British Army
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
The Hamsters also had a silver tiger figure as a table piece in the officers mess
 

TamH70

MIA
Herr Professor Doktor Google renders this as:

They are, however, I can not, I will not henceforth drive out the tractor, choose one of

You need an hour or so having your ear tweaked by John Cleese's Centurion, my son.

I thought it was bad Latin for "I can't read and I can't write, but I can drive a tractor!"
 
Non possum legere et scribere non possum, non possum tamen tractor expellam!

, , , according to Herr Professor Doktor Google, anyway . . . .

Dunno mate. I put in "I can't drive a tractor but I can pick one up"
 

Issi

LE
I played rugby against the Hampshire’s in L’derry in 90-91. I can’t remember who won, but it was a good game.
I seem to recall that they had a Joseph style stable belt of many colours.
 
I played rugby against the Hampshire’s in L’derry in 90-91. I can’t remember who won, but it was a good game.
I seem to recall that they had a Joseph style stable belt of many colours.
I played against the Hampshires in Lisburn in 1986? Only remember it because a Rupert was on the touchline shouting "" come on the Tigers grrrr, grrr, grrr" the tw@
 
On reading a few of these I certainly remember a few. The sergeant in the guard room with his daughter and the tunnels in Celle that led to Hohne.
Apparently divers went down to search the tunnels and never emerged!
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Thought Royal Anglicans was the RAChD…
When was your last diversity and inclusivity cse ?
There's all kinds of mumbo-jumbo religions now.
 
When was your last diversity and inclusivity cse ?
There's all kinds of mumbo-jumbo religions now.
I’m still boggling at seeing an email from a female Captain which had (under the sig block) “preferred pronouns “her/she”…
 
I’m still boggling at seeing an email from a female Captain which had (under the sig block) “preferred pronouns “her/she”…
You'd better get used to it.
 

Latest Threads

Top