Army to run on chip oil!!!!!!!

#1
Well I think it is pretty funny...

But do we produce as much oil as the article implies?

Also I was led to beleive that a complicated system should be added when running on chip oil. The engine must first get to temperature, then oil, then prior to shut of the engine must be flushed through with oil again to prevent the system being clogged with cold gooey chip fat!

clicky clicky
 
#2
Not quite accurate. If waste vegetable oil (WVO) was used directly then preheating etc would have to take place. Providing the process of transecterification takes place then the resultant fuel (bio-diesel) should be fine to use in all but the coldest of weather.

What is proposed here is a blend of bio-diesel and mineral diesel (Usually in about a 5-10% blend) which will work without a problem, indeed in France and Germany I believe this is the norm rather than the exception.

Interesting fact of the day (or not) is Rudolph Diesel invented the Diesel engine to run on oil derived from peanuts.
 
#3
chocolate_frog said:
But do we produce as much oil as the article implies?

clicky clicky
We must do. Every cookhouse I've been to had eggs doing backstroke and ironically posters everywhere saying choose a healthy option - there must have been small print that said "as long as it includes beans and chips".
 
#4
oh please FFS, can we not believe the sh1te these jousrnos churn out what aload of crap!!!!! :roll:
 
#5
my mates got a discovery which has basicly the same engine as a wolf

he runs chip oil

i can see moaning about missed meals on the increase as
whenever he gives me lift im starving after due to the smell
 
#6
That retired REME chap, Dick Strawbridge, was doing this just last week on the TV Show 'It's Not Easy Being Green'. He collected some used chip oil from the local chippy, pumped it through a filter with a catalysts of some sort (presumably the process referred to above) and then filled his landy and off he went! It was a bit of a faff, and included the warning, presumably for legal reasons, that 'even after paying tax, it's still cheaper'. So the MOD must remember that it will be liable for tax if it does start to use chip-oil, otherwise we will end up barrelling towards the end of the financial year and the usual travel ban and lack of stationery will be imposed yet again in a vain attempt to realise enough of a saving to cover the bill!
 
#7
Thsi has been going on for some time.

An article from 2002
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,3604,807299,00.html

A special police unit nicknamed the "frying squad" has been formed in a market town where hundreds of drivers are believed to be running their diesel cars on cooking oil.
Sniffing out unusually fragrant exhaust fumes, highway patrols have already collared several dozen offenders, who save more than 40p a litre by diverting oil from the kitchen cupboard to under the bonnet.

The Asda supermarket in Llanelli, south Wales, has slapped a ration on cooking oil sales, after astonished internal auditors found that it was selling far more than any other outlet in the country. Customs investigators are also involved in the "sniff patrols", which home in on any car smelling like a mobile fish and chip shop.

"It's a serious offence," said Bill O'Leary, spokesman for customs and excise, which levies tax on motor oil but not on the version used in saucepans. "By law, all cars on public roads must pay a tax on the fuel they use. Evasion carries a maximum seven-year jail term."
According to one victim of the crackdown, who did not want to be named, substituting 32p-a-litre cooking oil, with a dash of methanol, worked as sweetly in his diesel Subaru as the real, 73p-a-litre thing.

But the tell-tale odour proved his undoing when an unmarked police car flagged him down. "The officer went to the fuel tank, dipped it, and found cooking oil. I put my hands up to the offence but the car was towed away," he said. His oil savings vanished in a £500 fine for using illegal, untaxed fuel and £150 required as a towing fee.

Dyfed Powys police said they were working with customs on a stop-and-check basis because of the problem in Llanelli. While Asda limited cooking oil sales per customer, an AA spokeswoman said fry-driving "could severely damage your vehicle. You should always follow the manufacturer's instructions about which fuel to use".
 
#8
Did'nt Clarkeson test drive a car that ran on chip fat a while back.If I remember it,he got nearly the same MPG as using regular fuels.
 
#9
Oracle said:
Thsi has been going on for some time.

An article from 2002
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,3604,807299,00.html

A special police unit nicknamed the "frying squad" has been formed in a market town where hundreds of drivers are believed to be running their diesel cars on cooking oil.
Sniffing out unusually fragrant exhaust fumes, highway patrols have already collared several dozen offenders, who save more than 40p a litre by diverting oil from the kitchen cupboard to under the bonnet.

The Asda supermarket in Llanelli, south Wales, has slapped a ration on cooking oil sales, after astonished internal auditors found that it was selling far more than any other outlet in the country. Customs investigators are also involved in the "sniff patrols", which home in on any car smelling like a mobile fish and chip shop.

"It's a serious offence," said Bill O'Leary, spokesman for customs and excise, which levies tax on motor oil but not on the version used in saucepans. "By law, all cars on public roads must pay a tax on the fuel they use. Evasion carries a maximum seven-year jail term."
According to one victim of the crackdown, who did not want to be named, substituting 32p-a-litre cooking oil, with a dash of methanol, worked as sweetly in his diesel Subaru as the real, 73p-a-litre thing.

But the tell-tale odour proved his undoing when an unmarked police car flagged him down. "The officer went to the fuel tank, dipped it, and found cooking oil. I put my hands up to the offence but the car was towed away," he said. His oil savings vanished in a £500 fine for using illegal, untaxed fuel and £150 required as a towing fee.

Dyfed Powys police said they were working with customs on a stop-and-check basis because of the problem in Llanelli. While Asda limited cooking oil sales per customer, an AA spokeswoman said fry-driving "could severely damage your vehicle. You should always follow the manufacturer's instructions about which fuel to use".
Someone got it wrong; there's no such thing as a diesel subaru (yet)!
Biodiesel very simple for produce and use. Does the MoD receive any tax breaks from the treasury on fuel duty?
 
#11
My old Turbo Diesel Mondeo would (apparently) run happily on tesco's own brand at 43p a litre without any modification. It would be (allegedly) slightly harder to start as veg oil isn't as volatiile as diesel and in colder weather even harder to start. adding 10% white spirit or petrol would (so I'm told) improve this. Power ( I hear) would be down slightly and a slightly reduced MPG. It would also (were I to have used it) smell like mobile chip shop.

Knowing all this I had the cunning plan of buying a 432, running it on chip fat around SPTA for a day during big exercises and then once everyone is dying for chips, run a chippy from the back of the 432. (provided it managed to keep going for a whole day)

Various methods of reducing the smell (and therefore the likelyhood of detection) have been tried. Mixing waste engine oil is supposed to help, but that is surely going to reduce the green effect of running veg oil. Mixing with genuine diesel (reducing your savings and your green effect) and the most outrageous one is to simply pay the tax and make it legal for road use. How do you prove to the coppers who have stopped you that your tankfull of veg oil is a legal one as a tax paid tankfull is going to look very much like one that hasn't had tax paid on it.
 
#12
Surely if you buy the oil from a supermarket, you've paid tax on it? (VAT)....If thats the case, havent you paid tax on the fuel that you're using?

Thats assuming that vegatable oil is a taxable item...I'm not sure, but I remember when they started charging VAT on chips from the chippy, as its a 'luxury' item.....
 
#13
Different tax for being a road fuel I believe
 
#14
the tax they are on about is the fuel tax not VAT which is also charged on vehicle fuel.

Fuel with out this tax (ie for tractors and boats) is the red diesal.
 
#15
I think when I was based in Bicester, they had already started using the chip and veg oil in the vehicles because the ration assassins were cooking the eggs in OMD80, at least it tasted like it !!
 
#16
Feel I should 'define' what I posted earlier.(Now I'm not full of Hennessy) :oops: I have read an article on this and its called BIO DIESEL, a few firms are producing it from old chippy oil. But it takes a LOT of filtering and it needs to have an octane booster added as its a bit low on the old anti-knock octane. You do have to pay fuel duty on it and apparentley your car does smell like an old chippy whilst running it. Apparentley Mercs run the best on it as they design there engines to use bio diesel..
Can't ever see the forces doing it though, too much hassle for little cost savings and I do believe the Forces are exempt from fuel duty anyway, though I might be wrong on this one........ :D
 
#17
yamkwak said:
Feel I should 'define' what I posted earlier.(Now I'm not full of Hennessy) :oops: I have read an article on this and its called BIO DIESEL, a few firms are producing it from old chippy oil. But it takes a LOT of filtering and it needs to have an octane booster added as its a bit low on the old anti-knock octane. You do have to pay fuel duty on it and apparentley your car does smell like an old chippy whilst running it. Apparentley Mercs run the best on it as they design there engines to use bio diesel..
Can't ever see the forces doing it though, too much hassle for little cost savings and I do believe the Forces are exempt from fuel duty anyway, though I might be wrong on this one........ :D
Not really an octane booster; the main issue is "esterfication", which removes gumming agents which clog up the injectors.
Re. consumption. In theory fuel consumption should be higher, as biodiesel has a lower calorific value, but it actually burns better. They reckon because there is more oxygen bonded into biodiesel you get a cleaner burn (51% less hydrocarbon emissions and lower carbon monoxide)
The largest producer of biodiesel in the UK closed down earlier this year. They were called global commodities. They blamed unfavourable conditions and interfering from environment agency (who were doing their job, apparently).
Biodiesel is about 20p per litre more than mineral diesel; however the cost of disposal of cooking oil would need to be considered by the MoD in cost benefit analyis.
If you want academic papers, more info etc pm me... my dissertation was on biodiesel (I have no life)
 
#18
To widen the thread somewhat.

I saw (some time ago) a programme about a power station that created electricity from a chemical reaction using cow dung - does nayone have any information on this or can point me in the right direction. I've been looking for ages and cannot find anything
 
#19
Sven said:
To widen the thread somewhat.

I saw (some time ago) a programme about a power station that created electricity from a chemical reaction using cow dung - does nayone have any information on this or can point me in the right direction. I've been looking for ages and cannot find anything
I'll have a look; I know what you're talking about. If I remember right it's closed... I think it was basically to get methane out through anaerobic respiration with bacteria cultures, so methane could be burnt and the residue out the end was suitable for use as fertiliser. I'll have a hunt around
 
#20
crabby said:
Sven said:
To widen the thread somewhat.

I saw (some time ago) a programme about a power station that created electricity from a chemical reaction using cow dung - does nayone have any information on this or can point me in the right direction. I've been looking for ages and cannot find anything
I'll have a look; I know what you're talking about. If I remember right it's closed... I think it was basically to get methane out through anaerobic respiration with bacteria cultures, so methane could be burnt and the residue out the end was suitable for use as fertiliser. I'll have a hunt around
Thanks Crabs
 

Similar threads


New Posts

Latest Threads

Top