Army struggle to recruit!! Is this a result of A2020 draw down back to UK??

#21
#22
I'm flattered. What appears on the cards from CGS (he said so!)is a major d1cking of the reg res who have no option unlike the 'res res' who can do what they like. Hardly added incentive to join if rather than four years you're facing a near lifetime commitment even when you think you've left.
You couldn’t make it up really, could you? D1ck people around until they leave because they are threaders then order them back for more. And, no doubt, treat them as second class citizens when you call them back. Meanwhile destroying any goodwill left in a group who should be your best advocates.

It’s not an idea that has really been thought through and properly planned.
 
#23
You couldn’t make it up really, could you? D1ck people around until they leave because they are threaders then order them back for more. And, no doubt, treat them as second class citizens when you call them back. Meanwhile destroying any goodwill left in a group who should be your best advocates.

It’s not an idea that has really been thought through and properly planned.
Yup, think of what'll really p1ss off those leaving to ensure they pass on why they left. Then confirm it publicly!
 
#24
Yup, think of what'll really p1ss off those leaving to ensure they pass on why they left. Then confirm it publicly!
Like making people redundant/encouragement to leave and then a few months/years trying to get them to join the reserves.

If they needed reservists it should have been highlighted before they left while still (at least semi) engaged with the MOD
 
#25
John, a neat summary of multiple pages and threads! I too don’t believe that A2020 has anything to do with the problem.

It should, however, address a solution. A strategy for a future force structure that can’t be filled isn’t a strategy, it’s a fantasy.

The most obvious manifestation of this is the A2020 rebalance towards the Reserve which appears to have been a number picked out of the ether, a timeline that bore no relation to the scope of the task and no actual plan for delivery.
To me two separate issues but intertwined

The Government needs to decide the military capabilities it and the force structure to deliver it. They then need to resource it with personnel and equipment. In the case of personnel that means “the offer”.

That obviously all has to be balanced against what is realistic.
 
#27
I wonder how much blame Capita can take?
IMHO they are an easy scapegoat especially given their name and the ease with which they can be called Crapita. Sure, the contract has been fraught with issues but many of those were self-inflicted. End of the day, no-one knows if Capita have made the situation worse or better than it would have been under the old system because there was no beta test. Two up, bags of smoke......

But you can’t polish a turd. The main stream media is dominated by bad new stories; Harrogate and Deepcut, hounding of people 15 years after Iraq. Meanwhile FYB dominates the social Army’s media space rarely in a positive way.

Meanwhile corporate HQ has singularly failed to deliver a cohesive vision or even really explain what the Army is for, let alone how it is truly relevant 21st Century Britain.

It is findametally a leadership issue. Leadership in its wider meaning, not the functional leadership model that exists I. The green bubble.
 
#28
Like making people redundant/encouragement to leave and then a few months/years trying to get them to join the reserves.

If they needed reservists it should have been highlighted before they left while still (at least semi) engaged with the MOD
They're not "trying to get them to join the reserves" - they're already IN the regular reserve, as CGS pointed out recently, with an unavoidable long term call up liability they can't get out of ... a real incentive to pass on the good word ...
 
#29
They're not "trying to get them to join the reserves" - they're already IN the regular reserve, as CGS pointed out recently, with an unavoidable long term call up liability they can't get out of ... a real incentive to pass on the good word ...
Volunteer reserves
 
#30
They're not "trying to get them to join the reserves" - they're already IN the regular reserve, as CGS pointed out recently, with an unavoidable long term call up liability they can't get out of ... a real incentive to pass on the good word ...
Strictly speaking it isn’t unavoidable; “just” go and live overseas; call up papers aren’t enforceable in another legal jurisdiction. If you really want to avoid, ask for a letter of exemption, but that means joining someone else’s Army! It all back in as soon as you go back to the UK though.

More seriously, I think Carter’s idea of using the Regular Reserve is barking. It’s fraught with the potential for claims. What happens when a five-year out “soldier” who’s lost service career has been spent at a desk has a heart attack? I’m not thinking that many would pass medicals and fitness tests?
 
#31
2919? Surely even Crapita can turn around a recruiting crisis within 900 years!
Nope. I'd give more credence to reports of a big beardy guy in a seamless off-white robe perambulating across the Dead Sea than Capita ever sorting their shit out before the heat death of the universe, to be honest with you.
 
#32
You couldn’t make it up really, could you? D1ck people around until they leave because they are threaders then order them back for more. And, no doubt, treat them as second class citizens when you call them back. Meanwhile destroying any goodwill left in a group who should be your best advocates.

It’s not an idea that has really been thought through and properly planned.
I've said similar. Currently a lad signs off and then has to complete 12 months of service. The act of signing off in itself is usually only done when the individual is threaders, and the 12 months wait rarely helps as they end up in a sort of limbo. For a young lad with no accrued resettlement, let them go. Work it between troop and individual, and they could be gone in weeks. Once out they get a leaflet on rejoining. Ie, straight back in within two years. Moving to the Reserves should be more like a posting than leaving one Army, and then joining another. We might get a spike in sign offs but I'm pretty sure we'd get a fair few back. And we'd not have p*ssed time servers counting their year down. A warning off for Ops would trigger an extension of notice times.
 
#33
Strictly speaking it isn’t unavoidable; “just” go and live overseas; call up papers aren’t enforceable in another legal jurisdiction. If you really want to avoid, ask for a letter of exemption, but that means joining someone else’s Army! It all back in as soon as you go back to the UK though.

More seriously, I think Carter’s idea of using the Regular Reserve is barking. It’s fraught with the potential for claims. What happens when a five-year out “soldier” who’s lost service career has been spent at a desk has a heart attack? I’m not thinking that many would pass medicals and fitness tests?
generate regular reserve elements in units, and national pools depending upon practicality. Ie a niche unit maintains it's own pool but a more generic organisation maintains a more centralised pool. Then, and this is crucial, establish a competent register of skills, including newly acquired civvie skills. Then, at a local centre, run weekend individual training, at more general locations run a 7, 14 day skills concentration. Utilise distance learning for theory ie bcdt, reducing taught lessons to practical skills. Reserve rates of pay for turning out. Rack up 22 days and receive a £1750 bounty and 2.5 days paid leave. £175 slc. Access to in service courses. And AT. Paid, but on top of the 22 days, not attracting leave. Full time service would be simply soldier x arriving at unit for a specified time, ie 1 month ex,4-6 months winter maintenance, 1 week surge for a project or 12 months cycle for tour.
 

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