Army Recruitment and Popular Opinion

I can only point out that it's a rumour I heard (but then this is ARRSE), but there has apparently been a surge in applications online from EU nationals (mainly Eastern European) living in the UK. This may be related to Brexit I suppose (if true). Anyone else heard this or able to offer any insight? Also, would they be eligible to join under current nationality rules?
No.
 
I can only point out that it's a rumour I heard (but then this is ARRSE), but there has apparently been a surge in applications online from EU nationals (mainly Eastern European) living in the UK. This may be related to Brexit I suppose (if true). Anyone else heard this or able to offer any insight? Also, would they be eligible to join under current nationality rules?
God I hope not. If they start getting real jobs, I might have to start washing the car myself!
 
I could never fully understand how it takes so long from initial application to the parade ground, why months? it took me one week, from signing on to Catterick, and the army was twice the size it was now. This was in 1972. I appreciate that checks have to be made, today its I suspect, computerised, not so in 72, so why does it take so long?
Note:- A few years ago I applied to work on an army camp near Litchfield, in my trade, on new build accommodation blocks, I had already been cleared to work on MOD property in the past, but it took so long, that I had to take other work while waiting, when clearance was given, I was into my third month on another construction site, and so stayed where I was.
Same here. I'd been a cadet at a TA centre with a recruiting office in London. I walked into the ACIO and said that I was leaving school and wanted to join as a boy soldier. That was in Feb '77. I left school that Easter and was at IJLB by the time my classmates had gone back to school.
Here's the thing...I'd also approached RM and been told that the joining process would take much longer and that it would be at least the end of the summer before joining RMCTC. For that reason, I went to the army.
Now, it might be that RM were just testing my commitment, but the point is that I went elsewhere rather than wait. Is that not now the case with many potential recruits, in that, it takes so long to join that they lose interest and end up working elsewhere.

Maybe there's a case for a potential recruit type thing. So, the potential recruit expresses a wish to join a regt/corp and following security, medical and ID checks which should only take a couple of weeks, attends a pre-enlistment training plt where they spend a month or so doing phys and enlistment admin + a few 'meet the troops' jollies at the end of which they move accross to the shooty-stabby stuff and become a training platoon. Essentially, catch the potential recruit when they're at their most enthusiastic, get them into some sort of internal pre-training system, show interest in them and whilst that's going on, do the admin.

It does strike me as utterly ridiculous that a potential recruit has to wait such a disproportionately long time before they can join.
 
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Not too often I get criticised for brevity.
I can only point out that it's a rumour I heard (but then this is ARRSE), but there has apparently been a surge in applications online from EU nationals (mainly Eastern European) living in the UK. This may be related to Brexit I suppose (if true).
No, any Brexit changes will make no difference ... and no, it's not true.
Anyone else heard this or able to offer any insight?
No, there's no 'insight' to offer as it's neither correct nor feasible.
Also, would they be eligible to join under current nationality rules?
No, as should be blindingly obvious unless they're a dual national (EU + British / Commonwealth / Irish from an EU country without conscription).

I hope that's clear enough.
 
Maybe there's a case for a potential recruit type thing. So, the potential recruit expresses a wish to join a regt/corp and following security, medical and ID checks which should only take a couple of weeks, ...
If that only took a couple of weeks there'd be no delays so no need for costly pre-training "jollies".
It does strike me as utterly ridiculous that a potential recruit has to wait such a disproportionately long time before they can join.
Alternatively someone in your position as a cadet could apply early, with parental consent, and ensure joining the entry immediately following your 16th birthday or apply early at 17, ensuring time for any application process, and again ensure joining the entry immediately following their 18th birthday. Minimum delay, but the possibility doesn't seem to be being made clear.

Bear in mind also that the military is neither a first choice of career nor a first career for many recruits - more so now than in your / my day.
Is that not now the case with many potential recruits, in that, it takes so long to join that they lose interest and end up working elsewhere.
If only anyone knew ...
 
Not too often I get criticised for brevity.
No, any Brexit changes will make no difference ... and no, it's not true.No, there's no 'insight' to offer as it's neither correct nor feasible.
No, as should be blindingly obvious unless they're a dual national (EU + British / Commonwealth / Irish from an EU country without conscription).

I hope that's clear enough.
No.
 
It does strike me as utterly ridiculous that a potential recruit has to wait such a disproportionately long time before they can join.
I signed up in 1976 and was in training within a couple of months - no real delays other than waiting for the letter telling when I was due to tip for recruit selection (or whatever it was called) at Sutton Coldfield.

I was given some very good advice by the Sgt at the ACIO when I made my initial enquiry.

One thing always stuck in my mind, which served me well over the years - he said that when I went for my interview I should look confident and do my best to convince the interviewing officer that "without me the rest of the Army might just as well pack up and go home".

I note that since I left in 2003, the army does seem to have gone downhill somewhat...
 
Arthur West would have been an ideal recruit for one of those Soviet penal battalions, in which unarmed human waves were forced to run at the Nazi's machine guns in order to waste their ammo.

Oh, for some real communists to come along and educate these lefty pricks properly.
 
Not too often I get criticised for brevity.
No, any Brexit changes will make no difference ... and no, it's not true.No, there's no 'insight' to offer as it's neither correct nor feasible.
No, as should be blindingly obvious unless they're a dual national (EU + British / Commonwealth / Irish from an EU country without conscription).

I hope that's clear enough.
Well, that's better. I take your point about nationality, but part of my question still stands. Has there been a surge in applications from ineligible people that would explain why so many applications are being turned into so few recruits? In the old days, I would assume that a Polish or Romanian citizen would be sorted in the first five minutes in the careers office. If it's all online now, I suspect it could take months.
 
.
Well, that's better. I take your point about nationality, but part of my question still stands. Has there been a surge in applications from ineligible people that would explain why so many applications are being turned into so few recruits? In the old days, I would assume that a Polish or Romanian citizen would be sorted in the first five minutes in the careers office. If it's all online now, I suspect it could take months.
Yes.
 
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Well, that's better. I take your point about nationality, but part of my question still stands. Has there been a surge in applications from ineligible people that would explain why so many applications are being turned into so few recruits? In the old days, I would assume that a Polish or Romanian citizen would be sorted in the first five minutes in the careers office. If it's all online now, I suspect it could take months.
Sorry, couldn't resist.

Seriously, 'Yes', there has been a surge in applications both from those who are ineligible and those who are uninterested, currently being discussed elsewhere, as explained in the UK Armed Forces Personnel Statistics 2017. Poles, Romanians, etc aren't the reason / problem.

In summary, some 20,000 of what are currently termed "applications" are from Commonwealth applicants applying for 200 residency exempt specialist vacancies (around 100 applications per vacancy). These vacancies are new (edit: May 2016) and are exemptions to the five year residency rule, and have already been filled, and those applying are ineligible for routine Regular Army recruiting.

A considerable number are also as a result of changes to the JobSeeker Allowance, requiring those in receipt of the allowance to be actively seeking jobs. Applications for the Army take seconds on-line, and the longer they take to be processed the better for the applicants (who can always change their mind then re-apply again).

Here's the relevant part from the link (my bold):

There has been a large increase in the number of applications to join the Army Regular Forces in the last three quarters. The increase is, in part, due to a rise in Commonwealth applicants as a result of the announcement that residency requirements would be waived to allow 200 Commonwealth citizens per annum to be recruited to fill a limited number of roles in the Regular Armed Forces which require
specialist skills. In addition to this, the introduction of the Army Quick application process (‘Quick App’) in November 2016 may have resulted in increases in applications following this period. Since the same
period last year, there has been an overall increase of 27,990 applications to join the Regular Army.
......
The main causes of application failure (i.e. the applicant declines an offer to join):

  • Applicants may have submitted other applications for employment (including multiple applications to join the Armed Forces) and accept another offer;
  • Applications may be submitted with no intention to join (e.g. to satisfy the requirements of job seeking).

The following, from the same link, may also be of interest:

Due to differences in the application process for each Service, the three Services do not currently adopt the same definition of an ‘application’. Therefore, application numbers cannot be added together across the Services to show total Armed Forces applications (hence separate tables and graphs are provided).
The number of applications received does not directly relate to intake figures, since: Figures relate to the number of applications received and not the number of applicants, as one applicant may submit several applications;...
.....
 
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Sorry, couldn't resist.

Seriously, 'Yes', there has been a surge in applications both from those who are ineligible and those who are uninterested, currently being discussed elsewhere, as explained in the UK Armed Forces Personnel Statistics 2017. Poles, Romanians, etc aren't the reason / problem.

In summary, some 20,000 of what are currently termed "applications" are from Commonwealth applicants applying for 200 residency exempt specialist vacancies (around 100 applications per vacancy). These vacancies are new and are exemptions to the five year residency rule, and have already been filled, and those applying are ineligible for routine Regular Army recruiting.

A considerable number are also as a result of changes to the JobSeeker Allowance, requiring those in receipt of the allowance to be actively seeking jobs. Applications for the Army take seconds on-line, and the longer they take to be processed the better for the applicants (who can always change their mind then re-apply again).

Here's the relevant part from the link (my bold):

There has been a large increase in the number of applications to join the Army Regular Forces in the last
three quarters. The increase is, in part, due to a rise in Commonwealth applicants as a result of the
announcement that residency requirements would be waived to allow 200 Commonwealth citizens per
annum to be recruited to fill a limited number of roles in the Regular Armed Forces which require
specialist skills. In addition to this, the introduction of the Army Quick application process (‘Quick App’) in
November 2016 may have resulted in increases in applications following this period. Since the same

period last year, there has been an overall increase of 27,990 applications to join the Regular Army.
......
The main causes of application failure (i.e. the applicant declines an offer to join):

  • Applicants may have submitted other applications for employment (including multiple applications to join the Armed Forces) and accept another offer;
  • Applications may be submitted with no intention to join (e.g. to satisfy the requirements of job seeking).

The following, from the same link, may also be of interest:

Due to differences in the application process for each Service, the three Services do not currently adopt the same definition of an ‘application’. Therefore, application numbers cannot be added together across the Services to show total Armed Forces applications (hence separate tables and graphs are provided).
The number of applications received does not directly relate to intake figures, since: Figures relate to the number of applications received and not the number of applicants, as one applicant may submit several applications;...
.....
Not concise, but a model of clarity. Very informative. My thanks.
 
I could never fully understand how it takes so long from initial application to the parade ground, why months? it took me one week, from signing on to Catterick, and the army was twice the size it was now. This was in 1972. I appreciate that checks have to be made, today its I suspect, computerised, not so in 72, so why does it take so long?
Note:- A few years ago I applied to work on an army camp near Litchfield, in my trade, on new build accommodation blocks, I had already been cleared to work on MOD property in the past, but it took so long, that I had to take other work while waiting, when clearance was given, I was into my third month on another construction site, and so stayed where I was.
Same here. I'd been a cadet at a TA centre with a recruiting office in London. I walked into the ACIO and said that I was leaving school and wanted to join as a boy soldier. That was in Feb '77. I left school that Easter and was at IJLB by the time my classmates had gone back to school.
Here's the thing...I'd also approached RM and been told that the joining process would take much longer and that it would be at least the end of the summer before joining RMCTC. For that reason, I went to the army.
Now, it might be that RM were just testing my commitment, but the point is that I went elsewhere rather than wait. Is that not now the case with many potential recruits, in that, it takes so long to join that they lose interest and end up working elsewhere.

Maybe there's a case for a potential recruit type thing. So, the potential recruit expresses a wish to join a regt/corp and following security, medical and ID checks which should only take a couple of weeks, attends a pre-enlistment training plt where they spend a month or so doing phys and enlistment admin + a few 'meet the troops' jollies at the end of which they move accross to the shooty-stabby stuff and become a training platoon. Essentially, catch the potential recruit when they're at their most enthusiastic, get them into some sort of internal pre-training system, show interest in them and whilst that's going on, do the admin.

It does strike me as utterly ridiculous that a potential recruit has to wait such a disproportionately long time before they can join.
You could even join under the YTS Scheme back in the 80's. As I recall they did their initial training at various Junior Leader establishments; however, not having been a Jelly Tot I standby ready to be corrected!

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The writer, who served for three years, says: "I found his article personally offensive..." thereby losing my interest in her opinion at that point.
Hmm I am gobsmacked that sexism and racism in the forces are even an issue in this day and age. Sadly it seems that not much has changed in 40 odd years. Why did you lose interest was it because she only served for three years?
 

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