Army phrases that became civvie ones

On reflection I'll cough to a couple of 'over reactions' whilst on NI R&Rs.
I was sitting on a train waiting for it to start up when I fell asleep. Suddenly it let rip with its hooter and within a split second I'd slid off the seat and was sitting on my ass under the table bruised and confused, much to the exes amusement.
On another occasion I was asleep in bed and must've been dreaming (not the moist variety). There was a sudden loud, continuous noise - it must be a bomb, I had to get to it before the noise stopped. There was loud screaming, terrible.
Turned out the bomb was the alarm clock and the screaming was coming from the ex.
In my flailing desperation to get to the 'bomb' I'd planted my left elbow in her left eye, along with my full weight.
She was, fortunately, the only casualty, no actual humans were harmed.
 
The pilot who escaped by breaking parol was Roland 'bud' Wolfe, an American spitfire pilot in eagle squadron,
His spitfire came down in a bog in Donegal and was recently excavated for the BBC series dig ww2 ,
His scam was leaving the camp after signing parole, quickly turning back saying he'd forgot his gloves,
Then signing back in to get them,
He then walked past the parole hut and waved his gloves, thus suggesting he'd just nipped back in for them, but forgetting to sign parole as he left for 2nd time,
His argument was that by signing out, then signing in, then leaving for a 2nd time but not signing parole made it a legitimate escape because by signing in he hadn't broken parole,
Not sure on this bit but I think he headed to the British embassy in Dublin to arrange discrete transport north,
The Irish kicked up a bit of a stink about the sly underhand way he escaped and cancelled parole for all prisoners both German and allied so for the allies to save face he was deemed to have broken parole and sent back
The dirty, devious, underhanded Septic swine.
 
To get back to the original thread content, the Aussies use the term "Furphy" for gossip. This comes from the manufacturer of water tankers used by the ANZAC forces in WW1, and the best place to get the latest good gen when collecting the water rations.

Taking of which, where did "Gen" come from?
 

Joker62

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Book Reviewer
To get back to the original thread content, the Aussies use the term "Furphy" for gossip. This comes from the manufacturer of water tankers used by the ANZAC forces in WW1, and the best place to get the latest good gen when collecting the water rations.

Taking of which, where did "Gen" come from?
Short for Genuine as in genuine information?

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
 
As in "Gen dit" = True Story in Navy/Bootneck slang.

Don't ask me why "dit", though.
Taking a wild guess, 'dit' is a shortened form of 'ditty'. Sailors had a 'ditty box' to hold personal effects/trivia. Hence 'ditty' was a story that was a 'personal' anecdote or not necessarily true.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
To get back to the original thread content, the Aussies use the term "Furphy" for gossip. This comes from the manufacturer of water tankers used by the ANZAC forces in WW1, and the best place to get the latest good gen when collecting the water rations.

Taking of which, where did "Gen" come from?
Then they are more sophisticated than the Brits, we got ours at the latrine!
 
Taking a wild guess, 'dit' is a shortened form of 'ditty'. Sailors had a 'ditty box' to hold personal effects/trivia. Hence 'ditty' was a story that was a 'personal' anecdote or not necessarily true.
True, as in 'Dits of daring do........"
Dits Front Cover.jpg
 

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