Army phrases that became civvie ones

A donkey dick is/was also a type of short, semi rigid antenna on the Cougar - SMT radio set.
Also the unofficial name for the rubber concertina hose used to collect and guide the spent link and brass from the CR1 and CR2 coax into the storage bin. Tankies will know what I mean.
 
You covered the Indian Mutiny at primary school?
Yes. My teacher was one of those with a knack for finding topics that little boys would find interesting, generally mayhem and slaughter with weird little facts such as animal fat kicked it all off. Her name was Miss Turner and even at aged 7 I could appreciate a trim arse and tightly stretched white cotton blouse. I’m not sure if it was the mayhem etc or arse etc that made me look forward to history lessons.

Compare and contrast with some lefty harridan today airbrushing out colonial history.
 
Also the unofficial name for the rubber concertina hose used to collect and guide the spent link and brass from the CR1 and CR2 coax into the storage bin. Tankies will know what I mean.
Ditto Chieftain although always removed and replaced with a sandbag as the hose clogged up causing stoppages.
 
Fiddles are rails fitted round the edge of tables in rough weather. They stop the crockery from taking off

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I read that the fiddle was the raised edge of the plate to prevent losing your scoff.

From that it was reckoned if someone was taking a big enough helping that it went to the edges of the plate they were considered to be 'on the fiddle' -cheating.
 
Correct. IIRC the Indian Mutiny was about biting the top off small paper bags that held the powder charge. The bags were coated in animal fat to keep them dry and the origin animal (was it pigs or cows?) caused offence.

Again, could be bollocks but Primary School was a while ago for me.
IIRC, it was pigs fat, and the Muslim militia got a" cob on "about it, as pork was a religious no no.
 
Fiddles are rails fitted round the edge of tables in rough weather. They stop the crockery from taking off

Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk
I read that the fiddle was the raised edge of the plate to prevent losing your scoff.

From that it was reckoned if someone was taking a big enough helping that it went to the edges of the plate they were considered to be 'on the fiddle' -cheating.
The ships I sailed had fiddles permanently fitted to tables. All you had to do was swing them up into position when it got a bit blowy.

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Correct. IIRC the Indian Mutiny was about biting the top off small paper bags that held the powder charge. The bags were coated in animal fat to keep them dry and the origin animal (was it pigs or cows?) caused offence.

Again, could be bollocks but Primary School was a while ago for me.
The shit stirrers told the Hindu soldiers it was beef tallow and the Muslim ones it was pork fat, it was actually a mix of mutton fat and beeswax.
 
The shit stirrers told the Hindu soldiers it was beef tallow and the Muslim ones it was pork fat, it was actually a mix of mutton fat and beeswax.
So the “professionally outraged on behalf of someone else and never mind the facts set” is not a new concept? Every day’s a school day.
 
So the “professionally outraged on behalf of someone else and never mind the facts set” is not a new concept? Every day’s a school day.
I hadn't ever thought of it like that, but you are right, unfortunately.
 
Still used in civi Aviation RT. CAP 431 refers.
Use it all the time at work, saying "repeat that" could be misconstrued as continueing with an action, when it would be unwise to do so, as my Avatar shows.That was a poor judgement call on my part which partially shutdown the complex.....ooops............
 
C

count_duckula

Guest
It just meant the sort of 'fever' that was common in Deolali transit camp. Some guyswere probably being shipped out because they were stark staring bonkers (or feigning it).

The Hindustani word for mad is 'pagal' which was sometimes conjoined with 'paani' (water) to describe strong liquor. Haven't heard that used by civvies yet.
Flashman describes strong booze as "puggle" in the books, GMF was in Burma and went to the officer training centre/academy in India so he likely picked it up there.
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
Correct. IIRC the Indian Mutiny was about biting the top off small paper bags that held the powder charge. The bags were coated in animal fat to keep them dry and the origin animal (was it pigs or cows?) caused offence.

Again, could be bollocks but Primary School was a while ago for me.
The established rumour was that the wax was pig fat where muslim sepoys were concerned but it was beef fat if the sepoys were Hindu.
 
The established rumour was that the wax was pig fat where muslim sepoys were concerned but it was beef fat if the sepoys were Hindu.
Nonsense see below for the real story.

Bloodnok:
Why are the men mutinying?

Singhiz Thingz :
Indeed sir, there is a nasty rumour that the cartridges for their rifles are being greased with banana skins. [*2]

Seagoon:
Wellwellwellwellwellwellwellwellwellwell?

Singhiz Thingz :
Well sahib, the natives look upon the banana as a sacred animal.

Bloodnok:
What? Rattle me crowthers.

Seagoon:
Wooowoowoowoo.

Bloodnok:
Thank you. That's a lot of superstitious nonsense. The banana is a non-sacred animal.

Seagoon:
Nevertheless sir the native troops are enflamed.

Bloodnok:
Well we all are. It's the dohbi itch you know. Tell them to drink caster oil.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
'Flash to Bang' I'm sure was a WW1 artillery expression. When a hostile gun was fired there was a flash and as the Germans mostly chose their Trench positions on high ground, the flash often came from over the horizon or from a reverse slope position. The bang was the eventual 'Bang' that followed the initial 'Flash.' It was the gun's discharge. The length of time between Flash and Bang gave the approx range. The Caliber of weapons used dictated the approx range to be assessed. It was for counter bombardment purposes and to help in the nightly task of 'Searching Jerry's back areas' Both sides played hard at this to harass ration and ammunition parties.
Cross roads got it quite bad; Shells landed about those places 'like bloody hailstones' *

* The expression used by a WW1 RWF soldier that mentioned X roads to me.
 

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