Army phrases that became civvie ones

I had believed that the expression San Fairy Anne had died out with the generations following the end of the First War. However I was watching a lady being interviewed on TV recently and she dropped it into the conversation. Taken aback was I. I could have used the expression gobsmacked but that really is the pits.
 
I had believed that the expression San Fairy Anne had died out with the generations following the end of the First War. However I was watching a lady being interviewed on TV recently and she dropped it into the conversation. Taken aback was I. I could have used the expression gobsmacked but that really is the pits.
We don't hear 'sweet Fanny Adams' these days either. Always a favourite of my old man.
 
Bolshi, The term comes from the 1917 Russian Revolution by the Bolsheviks which spread to the German army after defeat in 1918 when they formed 'Soldiers councils' and to a very small extent to the British army in France awaiting a long drawn out demob.
It was originally rendered as Bolo for a nickname in the British Army.
 
In Australia, slang from the soldiers returning from wars one and two were also in common usage, with dekko and shufti (both for look) pretty well universal. But the one that makes me smile a bit is still in use today. Being to describe something as 'top of the wazzer', meaning well-equipped or just a bit special.

Few would be aware that the expression came back with our blokes at stumps after the '14-'18 unpleasantness, and refers to a famous brothel encountered by our wide-eyed touring team in Cairo before Gallipoli kicked off. It seems the top floors of the building had the more select companions, and were off limits to the troops. Things got a little out of hand. Battle of the Wazzir - Wikipedia

Hearing a young dad recommend a particular ice cream to his tackers as 'top of the wazza' makes me kinda proud of the enduring impact our silly young buggers had on the popular culture of the nation.
 
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Was in work today and heard someone say
"What's the flash to bang on that?"

No mil service, no pyrotechnics background. Said he'd heard it somewhere and liked it.

Also realised how much of a **** it makes you sound. To think I used to say it in all seriousness.

The shame.
I reckon that one dates back atleast to the time of Sharpe, and flintlock muskets
 

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In Australia, slang from the soldiers returning from wars one and two were also in common usage, with dekko and shufti (both for look) pretty well universal. But the one that make me smile a bit is still in use today. Being to describe something as 'top of the wazzer', meaning well-equipped or just a bit special.

Few would be aware that the expression came back with our blokes at stumps after the '14-'18 unpleasantness, and refers to a famous brothel encountered by our wide-eyed touring team in Cairo before Gallipoli kicked off. It seems the top floors of the building had the more select companions, and were off limits to the troops. Things got a little out of hand. Battle of the Wazzir - Wikipedia

Hearing a young dad recommend a particular ice cream to his tackers as 'top of the wazza' makes me kinda proud of the enduring impact our silly young buggers had on the popular culture of the nation.
Brilliant!
 
I reckon there's a sight more than 9 yards of material in the mainsail of a ship of the line. It's over 60 feet from the water to the top of the mainmast on HMS Victory.
As the sail was hoisted it hung from the Yards, that may have been nine Yards Long, that's over 27 feet and mutiply that squared for the overall size. IIRC.

Bugger now I can't multiply.
 
It just meant the sort of 'fever' that was common in Deolali transit camp. Some guyswere probably being shipped out because they were stark staring bonkers (or feigning it).

The Hindustani word for mad is 'pagal' which was sometimes conjoined with 'paani' (water) to describe strong liquor. Haven't heard that used by civvies yet.
That renowned work of etymological studies "Roger's Profanisaurus" defines a "Pagga" as a Special Brew fuelled punch up.
 
To quote Clausewitz/Sun Tzu/Thucydides...
 
Ignoring the highly suspect and discredited words allegedly based on acronyms (like tip and posh), I tried to think of a some genuine military examples;

Piat is the first that sprang to mind.
Radar is, but not quite.

Bren and Sten of course are not true acronym words but words made from abbreviations.

Although I suspect there are a good few others, the only non military acronym word that occurred to me and I believe is genuine, is WASP.
WASP, used by the good ole boys in redneck county, meaning White Anglo Saxon Protestant.
 

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