'Army' on standby for no deal Brexit emergency

Behind the Times paywall but you can get the gist of the article. By my reckoning the MOD held strength is currently around 150,000 give or take. Of this 150,000, what percentage could actually deploy on this MACP mission? 10%? 15%? One 400 man Battalion for a quick photo op with the PM? When are these historic taskings going to be amended to reflect the size and nature of the Armed Forces that successive Governments have deemed adequate?

Army on standby for no-deal Brexit emergency
 
Option A ; A sensible precaution to have a contingency plan if things do go Pete Tong.
Option B : Scaremogering from the die hard anti-Brexit campaigners.

I'll go for Option B.
 
I don't see how the MoD will be delivering things as apparently there won't be anything to deliver and we won't have the fuel to deliver it with.
 
Option A ; A sensible precaution to have a contingency plan if things do go Pete Tong.
Option B : Scaremogering from the die hard anti-Brexit campaigners.

I'll go for Option B.
My point is all these contingency plans have been sat in the back of a dusty desk for decades. It would be interesting to see just how many could actually be carried out by the current manning levels and structure of the Armed Forces. Another Fireman's strike? Forget it. Guarding all regional airports and ports? Forget it.
 
Option A ; A sensible precaution to have a contingency plan if things do go Pete Tong.
Option B : Scaremogering from the die hard anti-Brexit campaigners.

I'll go for Option B.
Option B the Times has been ruthlessly scaremongering and pushing the 'another vote' line ever since the vote. Why would we need the military to do transport, either the goods aren't there so there's nothing to transport or there's no fuel so there's no fuel for anyone, or are they suggesting there will be a shortage of lorry drivers.
 
are they suggesting there will be a shortage of lorry drivers.
If the Poles are marched out of the UK at the stroke of Brexit midnight, then yes! :)
 
My point is all these contingency plans have been sat in the back of a dusty desk for decades. It would be interesting to see just how many could actually be carried out by the current manning levels and structure of the Armed Forces. Another Fireman's strike? Forget it. Guarding all regional airports and ports? Forget it.
Actually, a couple of major supermarkets have been having meetings lately with both BIES and the MOD to dust off the Op ESCALIN plans.

This is probably where the confusion has stemmed from.

(Not least from the MOD side, whose plans currently rely on a number of recently closed Defence establishments suddenly being available again!)
 
Actually, a couple of major supermarkets have been having meetings lately with both BIES and the MOD to dust off the Op ESCALIN plans.

This is probably where the confusion has stemmed from.

(Not least from the MOD side, whose plans currently rely on a number of recently closed Defence establishments suddenly being available again!)
Surely this is an issue for the supermarkets? If I was the MOD I'd be preparing a massive bill for this service. If the positions were reversed there sure as hell would be.
 
If the Poles are marched out of the UK at the stroke of Brexit midnight, then yes! :)
And this is only going to happen in the minds of the terminally stupid. Despite the negative spin put on the numbers [Times headline "EU nationals leaving the UK in record numbers" IIRC] there are more Europeans in the UK now than there were at the time of the vote, the rate of increase has fallen a bit but it's still an increase.
 
Surely this is an issue for the supermarkets? If I was the MOD I'd be preparing a massive bill for this service. If the positions were reversed there sure as hell would be.
I’m a bit out of date on this one, but my understanding is fuel is part of the Critical National Infrastructure Programme, so if the supermarkets have a problem, the Government has a problem - hence the original requirement for Op ESCALIN.

No doubt an RLC Fuely will be along shortly to confirm or deny.
 
I’m a bit out of date on this one, but my understanding is fuel is part of the Critical National Infrastructure Programme, so if the supermarkets have a problem, the Government has a problem - hence the original requirement for Op ESCALIN.

No doubt an RLC Fuely will be along shortly to confirm or deny.
It's a problem of the Government's and fuel distribution companies own making. 'Petrol' tanker drivers used to be on around 45k a year (I'm going back 15 years here). Companies have taken advantage of the surplus of cheaper East European drivers throughout the transport industry to continually chip away at the salary scale so that the majority are now on nowhere near that sum and that's before you allow for inflation. The introduction of the DCPC in 2014 meant a number of the older drivers planned their retirement for 2019 (the renewal date for their DCPC).

Solution:

The Government extends the expiry date of all LGV driver's DCPC by 12 months.
The Government suspends EU drivers hours legislation for a 2 month period after Brexit (they did this for 4 weeks after the Fuel Protests). This means the fuel distribution drivers can then legally work 7 days a week which would minimise any disruption to supply.
 
No doubt an RLC Fuely will be along shortly to confirm or deny.
I'm not an RLC Fuely, but I have worked alongside the Op ESCALIN team in the same headquarters (the SO1 is a personal friend). You are absolutely correct in what you say; the issue isn't the supermarkets but rather the bulk fuel depots and their distribution chain.
 
The MoD don't pay for Op ESCALIN, BEIS do.
I stand corrected but my point remains. Why should commercial entities think that the MOD is an acceptable fallback position? I was involved in the last test of physically deploying the assets for Op ESCALIN. It didn't go well but I'm sure it did on paper.
 
I'm not an RLC Fuely, but I have worked alongside the Op ESCALIN team in the same headquarters (the SO1 is a personal friend). You are absolutely correct in what you say; the issue isn't the supermarkets but rather the bulk fuel depots and their distribution chain.
HM this isn't a dig at the Green input just the commercial organisations concerned.
 
I stand corrected but my point remains. Why should commercial entities think that the MOD is an acceptable fallback position? I was involved in the last test of physically deploying the assets for Op ESCALIN. It didn't go well but I'm sure it did on paper.
Because fuel is critical national infrastructure. It all our problem.
 

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