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army health care

#1
does anyone know what health care is available to people in the army? If you get ill and need care what will you be entitled to and is it any better than just going through the NHS?
 
#2
Ahem. Absolutely none - we're young(ish), fit(ish) blokes, sorry, people so don't need any of that guff. Oh and we're just about not to have pensions for the same reason.
 
#4
does anyone know what health care is available to people in the army? If you get ill and need care what will you be entitled to and is it any better than just going through the NHS?
You get at least the same standard of care as under the NHS, if not better, and usually much more timely. Additionally, if a service person needs treatment under the NHS, they are entitled to be treated as a 'priority', which effectively means that they can queue-jump in certain circumstances.
 
#5
so if your already being treated by the NHS which is taking too long its better to go through the army? Would you stay with the same hospital your being treated through or would the army transfer you?
 
#7
so if your already being treated by the NHS which is taking too long its better to go through the army? Would you stay with the same hospital your being treated through or would the army transfer you?
If you're getting any kind of long term treatment the Army would pass you on to the NHS anyway. Army medical care is first line GP, nurse and (if they're available) physio only.

Unless the treatment you're getting from the NHS involves heavy application of Brufen and tubigrip?
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#11
Primary healthcare for regular service personnel is provided by the Defence Primary Healthcare Service usually via an MRS or Med Centre. Emergency and secondary healthcare in this country is contracted by the MOD to the NHS.

Regular service pers may make their own private medical arrangements but would not normally be entitled to register with an NHS practice and therefore are unlikely to be in the NHS system.

For reservists if it's a service related injury or illness you may be able to access the DPHS but you would normally be told to go to your own NHS GP. As mentioned above service personnel do get some priority in the NHS, they're effectively private patients, but this is usually only a matter of weeks. NHS waiting lists are not usually that long despite some of the headlines.

If you have an illness or injury that is impacting on your military service and it's not being sorted then you should go back to your GP. You should also keep your med centre/RMO aware that you have a medical condition. This would usually be through the CoC but you are as entitled as anyone else to medical confidentiality and can contact the med people directly.
 

BuggerAll

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#12
Primary healthcare for regular service personnel is provided by the Defence Primary Healthcare Service usually via an MRS or Med Centre. Emergency and secondary healthcare in this country is contracted by the MOD to the NHS.

Regular service pers may make their own private medical arrangements but would not normally be entitled to register with an NHS practice and therefore are unlikely to be in the NHS system.

For reservists if it's a service related injury or illness you may be able to access the DPHS but you would normally be told to go to your own NHS GP. As mentioned above service personnel do get some priority in the NHS, they're effectively private patients, but this is usually only a matter of weeks. NHS waiting lists are not usually that long despite some of the headlines.

If you have an illness or injury that is impacting on your military service and it's not being sorted then you should go back to your GP. You should also keep your med centre/RMO aware that you have a medical condition. This would usually be through the CoC but you are as entitled as anyone else to medical confidentiality and can contact the med people directly.
My apologies I tried to give a sensible answer. I now doubt that the OP will be able to understand it. WTF is a
royal guard
sic

If this is a wah its pathetic.
 
#15
In view of the fact that that the MoD is probably the least regulated of all govt departments and writes its own rules and regulations, which carry few if any sanctions if breached, is there not now a need for debate on the absence of the statutory responsibility on the MoD to provide healthcare to Service personnel , who are even excluded from primary care under the NHS except in emergencies.

When the APCHS was set up following the closure of military hospitals, and despite public announcements to the contrary, contractual arrangements between the NHS and MoD to “Fast Track” Service personnel (SPs) excluded a significant number of patients.

In 2007, Fast Track was described to the Defence Committee[2] as a way to avoid long NHS waiting lists and enable the return to duty of military patients with musculoskeletal injuries (MSIs) by treating them in 6 or 10 weeks. This followed the public disquiet surrounding the closure of military hospitals and the perceived poor treatment of SPs. However it was agreed that only 90% of the injured would be treated in 10-weeks, the remainder being denied their entitlement to be treated in 18-weeks, a right enjoyed by all other UK citizens,

“No policy or guidance was in place at the time that required patients not treated within 10-weeks under an MoD commissioned contract to switch to an entitlement to be treated within 18-weeks under a Primary Care Trust commissioned contract.”

The impact of this policy upon SPs and their families over five different PCTs[1] and the medical and economic cost of delaying their treatment must be assessed to demonstrate that such exclusive contractual terms cannot be allowed in future negotiations for Defence health care. While the policy no longer exists, it was meant that injured SPs who were unfortunate enough to fall into that 10% received a lower standard of healthcare than any other UK citizen because there was no requirement to treat them in any time frame whatsoever. This in some cases has lead to serious medical consequence, leaving Serving personnel with three options - internal redress, JSP 831, civil action, or the media.

SPs were uninformed of the MoD:NHS agreement limitations and the subsequent impact upon their care pathways and were therefore denied essential choices concerning their care[3].

What monitoring and compliance takes place within the realms of procurement beyond that of what Dangermouse refers to as "group think" in his earlier post, "having a ‘an unquestioned belief in the group's inherent morality, thus enabling members to overlook the ethical consequences of their decisions'?

How can the Defence hierarchy continue to make such procurement decisions, which in this case allowed for the denial of healthcare rights available to all other UK citizens, without fear of sanction, or even monitoring.

The appointment of an Armed Forces Ombudsman is the first step in providing accountability to our Armed Forces. Trust is not enough anymore. Our Services deserve accountability.


[HR][/HR][1] Portsmouth, Derriford, Frimley Park, Northallerton and Peterborough

[2] “Medical Care for the Armed Forces Seventh Report of Session 2007–08” Seventh Report of Session 2007–08 Report, together with formal minutes, oral and written evidence. Evidence 94. Point 43 P193. ISBN: 978-0215-51368-7 House of Commons - Defence - Seventh Report

[3] Ibid
 
#17
I've had very recent experience of Army primary health, pull up a sandbag and I'll fill you in -

After being med-evaced twice in a 14 day period whilst deployed on H16 the Doctors diagnosed me with "Helmand Fever". This is a nonsensical term for an unknown bout of illness suffered whilst away on Ops/Ex and can be translated to any theatre the military and our Med staff operate, ie Kenya Fever, Basra Fever Et al. My symptoms were - vomiting, constipation, abdominal pain, cramps, head aches and a high temp.


I returned to my post in a dusty bumhole of a place as soon as my symptoms had subsided. I reported sick another couple of times but it was different doctors and they seemed to have had other important things to take care of such as cold drinks supplies and the such and my end of tour was approaching fast by this time I had developed ways to counter the symptoms so I suffered in relative silence.

On returning to the UK my symptoms persisted. I continued to report sick to the Med center and with the inability to put it down as continued Helmand fever or the like (Tidworth Fever was cured in the 60s) (( it still exists in the Ram )) the doctor diagnosed me with constipation and prescribed me with some chalky powder and some pills to help me go, ya know, poopy. It didn't work. I reported sick a couple of weeks later and saw a different doctor, they prescribed me the same medication. After a further 2 visits and another 2 GPs I decided enough was enough and went to a local A&E who gave me an x ray and refered me for an MRI. I returned to work and informed the Med staff who seemed indifferent. After another week the symptoms were so bad that my lovely Mrs took me off to another A&E who again conducted an x ray and subsequently referred me for MRI the same day. This was followed by a BBC camera crew up the wrongun.

The hospital found a Full thickness tumor on My large intestine. It was removed and I'm getting better. Basically the NHS did in a weekend what the military primary health failed to do over 7 months.

The military system is very good at the square peg scenarios it faces daily on ops but when it comes to the round pegs there is alot of room for improvement and not just in theatre. The worst part of all of it was the GPs in the UK who didn't seem to put 2 & 2 together. The inability to see the same GP increased the problem.

Of course this is my opinion based on my experience. Thanks for reading hope this hasn't bored the socks off you too much.
 
#18
Not bored in the slightest my friend. Just very very sad. Just as a matter of interest, has this affected your career? PM me if you prefer.
 
#19
Batmansbatman

Thank you for posting this. Unless people speak out when things go wrong, patterns will not be spotted and dots will not be joined.

By way of return, allow me to tell you of another example. Young guy, young family, serving overseas, lands badly sending shocks through his legs. Reports to MO but no X-ray facilities available to him in theatre. Advised to take it easy - man tries not to die laughing.... The incident reoccurs, several times, making the symptoms worse. He stops sleeping and the pain increases. He is prescribed the usual and told to see his MO on return. This he does and is treated for the next two years for sore knees and groin strain. X-rays are repeatedly refused because the physio.s "know what it is" and he is convinced that all he has is groin strain and tight hips. He starts walking like a little old man and is ostracised for being unfit. So he works harder. And the pain and depression get worse.

It turns out, when he is eventually X-rayed two years later, he has almost completely destroyed the bones in his hips (bone death), has cracked femurs and is rubbing bone on bone. His first and only course of treatment is to have a double hip replacement. He then waits 9-months to be treated on the NHS because at this time, the NHS are only obliged to treat 90% of military patients within a specified time, the remainder lose their right to be treated in 18-weeks as per civilians (seems unbelievable, but apparently true, I've seen proof). During this time he is bed bound, and has to rely on his wife and daughters for everything.

When he is eventually treated his pain levels are so high, it is almost impossible to get them under control and he develops neurological problems. He is unable to leave the hospital for 3 months, is in a wheelchair for over two years, and years later still suffers the consequences.

Problems include bad procurement practices, lost medical records, inconsistent medical care, failure to read medical records and a cultural inclination to take visible injuries seriously, but ignore the invisible ones in preference for believing complainants to be malingerers or just plain lazy.

Like you, this is based on what I have witnessed. I am aware of some very good medical care but I have also witnessed some very negative examples.

I sincerely hope these experiences are isolated and I really hope that nobody else will post anything similar.
 

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