Army as a soldier or Navy as a officer

Discussion in 'Join the Army - Regular Soldier Recruitment' started by Uncertain118, Jun 11, 2010.

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  1. Hello there.

    First things first. I failed AOSB and decided I liked a few jobs as a enlisted man and started the ball rolling a month or so ago.
    I'm in the TA so it was taking some time to process and get a Barb sorted out. At this point I was interested in seeing what I was deemed suitable for, and had it pointed out that during this time that if I've completed ADSC and don't like the job offers available, I could decline them and walk away. If I got to that point I wouldn't walk away, but I was told the option was there.

    During this processing period I saw a job on the navy website in a officer role that also interested. I put the application in, have since done the RT and I'm waiting on the medicals.
    I had spoken to my TA unit in regards initially to my interest in going regular, but also had mentioned the navy. The advice I was given unofficially I think, was that I could theoretically have two applications running at the same time, but obviously I would have to choose one when it come down to it.

    I have since had a phone call from my recruiting Sgt saying he's been told I have a concurrent application running and that I need to chose ASAP. I think the premise was before the Barb, which is before the naval medical. To be honest because of the stage I was at for both, I had not told the army contact about the concurrent application, but at the beginning told the naval contact that I had put in a regular soldier application and that I had attempted and been unsuccessful at AOSB. Because of this I can appreciate why the Sgt was annoyed, but based on his responses from before and the advise from my unit, I didn't see an issue arising, and should I get past some of the more important stages of both applications, I would inform them what was happening out of common courtesy.

    I like the look of both roles, have experience in the army from the TA, but also like the look of the navy and the lifestyle and traditions and whatnot. Both careers appeal to me.

    I'm inclined to put my army application on hold as I'll be near the 29 year old cut off soon for the navy, although at such an early stage I didn't want to have to chose before I've had a barb test.

    Would those reading suggest I try and get a barb test done first and see what happens, or make a decision within the next week or so, before I can progress any further with the navy.
     
  2. Simple - Navy Officer beats Army Soldier at every level. however you will have to work fiicking hard to be either - so decide and move on.
     
  3. Depends what they failed you for on your AOSB as I imagine the RN's version is probably just as challenging. Good luck which ever way you go.
     
  4. Very much what I though re decide and move on. I would throw myself into either one 100%, 50% of either doesn't cut it.

    DrunkenIrish- I am by no means thinking it would be easy incomparision to the army AOSB. I have asked (a few times too many to be honest) the naval recruiting contact if I would be wasting my time. His words were basically that they are looking for similar, but different characteristics/qualities.

    My failure was on not being assertive enough (summarised, but taken from the group discussion, outdoor exercises and plan ex discussion). I was apparently a high value candidate, but the risks were deemed too high to select me.
    My debrief highlighted I was very good when under pressure post plan ex, but they found my personal plan ex solution risky (I choose a bridge that was due to be washed away with a person with internal injuries which took 90 minutes to get to a hospital, over a flooded lake with choppy seas 6 1/2 hours commute). Nothing else was really highlighted.
     
  5. Good Luck - never give in!
     
  6. Many thanks.

    Surprised no one else has voiced an opinion.
     
  7. No opinion to offer but a couple of observations:

    You're user name is Uncertain and AOSB questioned your assertiveness............see where I'm going with this one?

    How old are you? Early 20s? What TA unit do you serve with? Do you hold a NCO rank or are you a Private soldier?

    I would suggest that you develope the gaps in your skill set (bloody CIPD-speak) with your current unit. Push for any cadres on offer, any AT that's going, etc. Further, you need to understand that most small unit leadership is a mix of autocratic and consultative/participative styles: the confidence on when and how to apply any style of leadership can only be developed by practice.
     
  8. I see what you mean.

    Late 20's (not long before the cut off infact) and I'm with an infantry battalion.
    I'm a private and from flash to bang I have only been in just over a year.
    There is a spot of AT going on this summer, so I'll get on that and see if there are any cadres the pop up that I am eligible for.


    Many thanks for the input.
     
  9. Sorry - I've just sobered up enough to use the keyboard.

    I sat the Admiralty Interview Board when the Royal Navy still had steam powered ships. Unlike you, and many others, I had the benefit of some tuition from serving officers who had already done the board. This was of great benefit to me. Could you speak to some serving or former naval officers?

    If there's a Royal Naval Reserve division near your TA centre, see whether you can invite some of the officers round for drinks in your TA mess or try to blag an invite next time your officers get an invite to the RNR wardroom. Many RNR officers are ex-RN and they'll all have done the RNR AIB.

    Failing that, join the British Legion and, err, hang out in their bar trying to attract sailors. You'll no doubt find plenty of old sea dogs willing to spin you a yarn about AIB.

    From my very limited knowledge of the Army, Royal Marines and RAF officer selection boards, they are all almost identical to the RN board in general format. If the Army board failed you for lack of assertiveness then the AIB will likely identify that as a problem too.

    Pre-AIB, lack of assertiveness was something that was identified as a problem for me too. Here is what I was told:-

    There are two main stages of the board where assertiveness is assessed.

    The first is in the gym tests where you will swing about on ropes and build bridges out of planks. When it is your turn to lead the group:-

    1 Brief them clearly on the objective and on your plan. Speak a bit louder and slower than normal. Ask if anybody has questions but don't allow waffle or debate.

    2 Don't be afraid to change your plan if you think one of your team has a better idea.

    3 Give directions to your team throughout the exercise. Encourage those who are slightly weak with praise. At AIB you don't look good by making others look bad.

    4 If your exquisitely constructed cantilever bridge falls apart and your team goes into the water, don't panic, just recover as best you can and proceed with the task as if nothing happened. By no means does falling in mean that you have failed.

    The second point where assertiveness is assessed is in the group discussion phase. Your group will be given a problem scenario and you will be given time to find a solution while the board observes your discussions.

    It is vital that you don't sit back and let everybody else do the talking. This could be difficult if you have strong personalities in your group. You'll need to put your ideas forward quite forcefully. Be seen to be making a contribution but don't drown others out. If one of your group isn't making much of a contribution, ask them to speak up. It's likely that some of your group will be school kids and you will do well to be seen to encourage them if they're a bit shy.

    After your team has formulated a plan, one of the board will rip you to pieces! Don't let this panic you. They're only doing it to see if you'll change your mind under pressure. Be polite but firm:-

    "I see your point but I still believe our plan will give the greatest chance of success"

    "You are correct to say that our plan is risky but I still believe that other options would involve greater risk."

    After my group discussion, our inquisitor had a laugh with us and said that we had picked an optimum solution to the problem which involved rescuing a bloke with a broken leg from a tent at the South Pole. So remember, no matter how angry he gets or how loud he shouts, stick to your decision and remember it's all just a game.

    Good luck to you. I envy you, just starting a great career.

    One final bit of advice. If you pass AIB and get to Dartmouth, you'll get sent to sea for a while. On joining your first ship, don't ever let anybody persuade you to climb into an empty barrel, even if they say it's your turn in the barrel.
     
  10. Ancient_Mariner- many thanks for your input, I appreciate it.

    I only know one Royal Navy Officer who is a friend from my days of University. It was him who I pinged regarding the lifestyle.
    I will see if I can pick up any nice men to show me the ropes. I don't know of any RNR divisions near me, but will have a look around.
    I might try and get a day visit on a ship if possible. Portsmouth isn't a million miles away from me.
     
  11. Uncertain, AM certainly makes excellent points here and if I may I would just like to suggest a tctic I have seen work:

    (Quote AM) :The second point where assertiveness is assessed is in the group discussion phase. Your group will be given a problem scenario and you will be given time to find a solution while the board observes your discussions.

    It is vital that you don't sit back and let everybody else do the talking. This could be difficult if you have strong personalities in your group. You'll need to put your ideas forward quite forcefully. Be seen to be making a contribution but don't drown others out. If one of your group isn't making much of a contribution, ask them to speak up. It's likely that some of your group will be school kids and you will do well to be seen to encourage them if they're a bit shy. (Quote).

    A agree with AM's comments but what can work is to await the end of the initial brief on this discussion and then before anyone says anything, jump in with something like:

    "Before we start this I suggest that we all just think a little about what it is that we have to contribute and then rather than shout against each other, that we instead discuss each point in order." Then quickly ask the biggest, ugliest member of the team . "Billybigguy (use his name), what do you think?"
     
  12. Many thanks for the input and suggestions.
     
  13. Guns

    Guns LE Moderator Book Reviewer
    1. The Royal Navy

    I'm biased go Navy. However we are pretty flush at the moment and are able to pick and choice in Warfare (and don't let the Aviators tell you anything other they are Warfare), Loggie and RM. Engineers - if you can blink and breath with any form of half decent engineering degree your in.

    The AIB is similar in output to the Army version just a different way of doing it, if you struggled with one you may with another. Mind you I know many who failed first time round, reviewed what they needed to do to improve and then passed.