Army abuse trial collapses

I find that tale difficult to believe, it stands to reason that anyone seen doing a deed like that, once or twice, would not last very long before having a little piece of lead inserted into him, considering that every soldier was armed to the teeth.
The soldiers concerned would have very little to lose, when you think about what they were facing.
"Battle Police", used to follow up in attacks and encourage forward squaddies who were taking cover a bit too long, also take charge of prisoners, arrange assistance for wounded and the like.
I can't remember the full details but I remember reading a mention of them by a subaltern.
He'd gone to ground and was reluctant to get moving when one of these characters appeared and indicated with his pistol the direction to go in and said "Excuse me sir, but shouldn't we be up there sir?"
Did the trick apparently.
 
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We really are going to have to decide upon the nature of farmyard animal.
Goat, lamb - considering she's a form of copper how about pig? I haven't met the lady but I'm sure a bit of lipstick might help.
 
As a former RMP NCO, personally I feel the time has come to merge all three service police organisations into a single force run along the lines of MDP, with a more stringent training regime and monitoring process. They should be a separate entity to the armed forces so they can't be accused of military incompetence.
separate entity, That would be the metropolitan police forces of England then?
 
As a former RMP NCO, personally I feel the time has come to merge all three service police organisations into a single force run along the lines of MDP, with a more stringent training regime and monitoring process. They should be a separate entity to the armed forces so they can't be accused of military incompetence.
Don't all 3 Services do their basic MP training together?
 
[Thread Drift] When I was at Lippstadt in the mid eighties we a "village bobby" in the form of a RMP Sgt, he lived in the Garrison and was on call for infractions within said Garrison. From my experience as a Squadron Sergeant Major I never found him to be vindictive or hell bent on persecuting soldiers for the fun of it. Maybe it was the individual concerned but I found him easy to get on with and always saw him as an asset, as did my fellow SNCO's. [/Thread Drift]
 
Don't get me wrong, there were many occasions on patrol when I saw a drunken soldier up town about to get into trouble with civpol, I told them I'd deal with it and dropped the squaddie off at camp and told him to go and sleep it off. It was the ones that got lippy spent the night in the guardroom.
 
The only reason people that drunk are stuck in a guardroom cell these days are so you can keep an eye on them and make sure they don't choke to death if they throw up.
 

Auld-Yin

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I normally handed them to the guard commander/provost sgt, and they did the locking up. ;)
Typical Monkey, you lift the guy then wash your hands when handing over to the guard commander. Did you just take the soldier into the quardroom and say to the guard commander "Here is one of yours, do what you will" or did you actually place a report on said soldier?
 
Banter aside, maybe there's a need for a complete 'outside the box' type restructuring of military provost.

What about putting potential provost through the civpol training and probation (2 years), during which they also complete their provost training in the same way that reservists do. At the end of the 2 years, they then revert to a military role in whatever service.

There's already a precedence for this in other professions, so why not?

Even though I've thrown this idea into the discussion, I can already see the potential for problems, but.....:rmp::police:
 
Typical Monkey, you lift the guy then wash your hands when handing over to the guard commander. Did you just take the soldier into the quardroom and say to the guard commander "Here is one of yours, do what you will" or did you actually place a report on said soldier?
No, dropped him at his block to get his head down if he was ok with me. He only went to the guardroom if he was under close arrest.
 
[Thread Drift] When I was at Lippstadt in the mid eighties we a "village bobby" in the form of a RMP Sgt, he lived in the Garrison and was on call for infractions within said Garrison. From my experience as a Squadron Sergeant Major I never found him to be vindictive or hell bent on persecuting soldiers for the fun of it. Maybe it was the individual concerned but I found him easy to get on with and always saw him as an asset, as did my fellow SNCO's. [/Thread Drift]
Are you trying to suggest that some people are good, moral human beings that are good at their vocation and some people aren't?

To be fair on the RMP (as CivPol) there are many of them out there who join up with honest intentions and remain untainted.

There are also those who by design or incompetence fail to do so. It's the Human Condition and is found in all walks of life.

Which reminds me of the RAF Police Flt Lt who got busted for selling Coke (the Columbian variant, not the Soft Drink). He made the mistake of banning one of his customers cars from camp for a parking violation.
 

Auld-Yin

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Banter aside, maybe there's a need for a complete 'outside the box' type restructuring of military provost.

What about putting potential provost through the civpol training and probation (2 years), during which they also complete their provost training in the same way that reservists do. At the end of the 2 years, they then revert to a military role in whatever service.

There's already a precedence for this in other professions, so why not?

Even though I've thrown this idea into the discussion, I can already see the potential for problems, but.....:rmp::police:
The first problem is the army itself - do they know what they want, a policeman or a soldier? At the moment it is looking as though soldier is the dominant ethos.
 
I think there's a pretty strong raison d'être for the RMP. The MOD must own tens of thousands of these. Who else would do route recce and marking? :)

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The only reason people that drunk are stuck in a guardroom cell these days are so you can keep an eye on them and make sure they don't choke to death if they throw up.
Presumably then, you've also got a qualified health care professional in the guard room with you, who will confirm they're fit for detention, will oversee them whist they're detained and set the requirements which must be adhered to whilst they're in your care. That's what happens in civpol cells.
 

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