Army abuse trial collapses

Incompetence is also failing to be able to make the distinction between 'their' and 'they're'.
Gosh, your (I know) correct. My grammatical error, on a little read website absolves the monkeys of their utter incompetence.

We'll (I know) done you. You've got them off the hook

The world will now look upon the monkeys as the pinnacle of law enforcement with awe and envy. You must be proud
 
I find that tale difficult to believe, it stands to reason that anyone seen doing a deed like that, once or twice, would not last very long before having a little piece of lead inserted into him, considering that every soldier was armed to the teeth.
The soldiers concerned would have very little to lose, when you think about what they were facing.
Concur. I have never ever heard of HM Forces doing that. Even during the Napoleonic war, Provost Coys used to hunt deserters down and return them to British lines for GCM.
Even the RN used to return mutineers back to port for trial.
 
From the Beeb, this afternoon:
a solicitor who specialises in defending soldiers at courts martial, said he was "appalled" by what had emerged during the trial.

"When I heard what Capt Spanton had to say even I didn't believe it could be that bad.

"When they are saying they are making a policy decision to deliberately breach the codes of practice and breach the Attorney General's guidelines, even I couldn't believe it could be that bad."

Mr Cherry said the investigation had been "deliberately improper".

"Here they are deliberately getting it wrong, they are looking the opposite way. They are only looking for their guilt, not their innocence."

He said those managing the RMP must be investigated.
and:

The Judge Advocate was scathing about the way the RMP handled the investigation; there were long delays in taking statements and evidence was lost or ignored.

Some of the teenage recruits had "no, or at very best vague, recollections" of the events and key witnesses, including Army instructors, weren't even spoken to.

Judge Alan Large concluded the RMP had carried out the case "in direct breach of their duty to investigate fairly and objectively".
This is long overdue, IMHO.

Those (mostly late of the RMP) on this site who know my log-standing, low opinion of the culture of the RMP need to take note - this case vindicates everything I've ever posted about the RMP.

Unless, of course, this is a sudden and unexplained departure from long-established everyday RMP working norms :roll: rather than the long-overdue exposure to the public gaze, of long-standing, corporately-indulged institutional ineptitude where the 'Police' part of RMP duties are concerned.

The sadness, IMHO, is that it's taken a civvie judge to point the finger at piss-poor leadership in the Corps.

One woulda hoped that senior leaders NOT of the RMP, carrying out their leadership functions diligently, with intelligence, imagination and all that kind of professional stuff that's s'posed to be second nature - might have caught a whiff, ahead of time, that something was a bit 'orf', and dealt with it.

Mebbe that's just me.
 
From the Beeb, this afternoon:


and:



This is long overdue, IMHO.

Those (mostly late of the RMP) on this site who know my log-standing, low opinion of the culture of the RMP need to take note - this case vindicates everything I've ever posted about the RMP.

Unless, of course, this is a sudden and unexplained departure from long-established everyday RMP working norms :roll: rather than the long-overdue exposure to the public gaze, of long-standing, corporately-indulged institutional ineptitude where the 'Police' part of RMP duties are concerned.

The sadness, IMHO, is that it's taken a civvie judge to point the finger at piss-poor leadership in the Corps.

One woulda hoped that senior leaders NOT of the RMP, carrying out their leadership functions diligently, with intelligence, imagination and all that kind of professional stuff that's s'posed to be second nature - might have caught a whiff, ahead of time, that something was a bit 'orf', and dealt with it.

Mebbe that's just me.
Nice post. Shame you made a grammatical error which, apparently, destroys the points you make.

RMP, can't detect a crime, but can point out a grammatical error at a thousand yards
 
I spent six long months training to receive those powers, why shouldn't I use them? I wasn't a RMP NCO to win popularity contests. ;)
Are 6 long months any different to any other 6 months.
It seems to me that you are digging yourself into a large hole here with your utterances.
 
Why not train RMP thoroughly in police procedures in the first place ?
Evidence gathering, interviewing, chain of custody etc .
Start off with old episodes of The Bill and see who can get their heads around it.
 
I spent six long months training to receive those powers, why shouldn't I use them? I wasn't a RMP NCO to win popularity contests. ;)
All RMPs are NCOs unless the mong gets busted
 
That there is the word and the attitude that explains why they are so disliked.
I rather suspect that it is more an adopted posture handed down from national service days. I would venture to suggest that a modern day soldier could complete their entire service without so much as seeing a MP.... unless of course they were absolutely determined to do so.
 
I spent six long months training to receive those powers, why shouldn't I use them? I wasn't a RMP NCO to win popularity contests. ;)
Typical monkey, me me me, look at ME....what do they teach in 6 long months? my tech course was only 20 short months.
 
With the drawdown from Germany etc. Why do we need the RMP?
 

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