Armed forces superbug menaces UK

#1
Armed forces 'superbug' menaces UK

The UK, the United States and Canada are facing growing fears over a drug-resistant 'superbug' being brought back by wounded soldiers from Afghanistan and Iraq that threatens to contaminate civilian hospitals.

The intensified concern comes amid sharply rising infection rates in the US and fresh worries in Canada that the bug could be imported into its civilian healthcare system. Military health officials who have studied the bacterium in Afghanistan believe the infection of wounded British soldiers in field hospitals there is probably inevitable.

The US military originally thought the bug came from contaminated Iraqi soil, but troops in Afghanistan have also been infected. Canada's public health service last week revealed it had ordered the screening of all its wounded soldiers being repatriated from Afghanistan.

The bacterium, Acinetobacter baumannii, first emerged as a 'mystery infection' afflicting US service personnel returning from the war in Iraq in 2003-04. It was described by a scientific journal specialising in hospital epidemiology as the 'most important emerging hospital-acquired pathogen worldwide'. The journal added that it was potentially a 'major threat to public health' due to its ability to mutate rapidly and develop a resistance to all known drugs.

Although different types of acinetobacter have been known for decades in hospitals, the new 'T' strain identified in the injured troops is particularly virulent and has been observed to appear in US servicemen within two hours of being admitted to a field hospital. It affects the spinal fluid, bones and lungs, causing pneumonia, respiratory failure and other complications. Equally worrying is its resilience. Extremely difficult to eliminate from medical facilities once established, the bug can survive for up to 176 days in a human host. US officials concede that, once established in the medical evacuation chain, the germ is almost impossible to stamp out.

Although the Ministry of Defence tried to play down fears of the infection when the first suspected British cases were reported last year in the Lancet, its increasingly rampant progress through America's military hospital system has been causing intense alarm elsewhere.

Canadian military doctors investigated the infection in Canadian troops at an intensive care unit in Kandahar and published a report in the journal BMC Infectious Diseases earlier this year.

The officers warned that their findings about the infection risk were 'equally applicable to US and British military field hospitals as well', adding that 'the environmental and logistical problems that faced [the medical units involved] are common across field hospitals in Afghanistan and Iraq'. They added that 'unrestricted use of antibiotics' at the field hospitals to compensate for poor environmental conditions had contributed to the emergence of the new superstrain.

In addition to a new screening regime, Canadian infectious disease officials will meet early next year to develop a national strategy to deal with the risk of the new strain spreading to civilian hospitals.

One of the report's authors, Major Homer Tien, told The Observer from Kandahar yesterday that further outbreaks appeared inevitable. 'No one really knows how it is being transmitted. What is certain is that it is a big concern,' he said. 'A lot of the work I was doing was trying to pinpoint the source of the infection. We still can't say what the source was. If we can't prevent it, the next question is how we can keep the hospitals back home in the UK and Canada from being infected.'

Concern is all the higher because, as in the UK, injured Canadian troops are treated in the civilian healthcare system, while most Americans are treated in an extensive network of military hospitals.

Infection rates have risen steeply in the US. In 2001 and 2002, around 2 per cent of admissions were infected at a specialist army burns unit in Texas. By 2003 the rate had risen to 6 per cent, then 12 per cent by 2005, a rate consistent with other facilities. So far, 27 servicemen have died from the infection.

In stark contrast to Canada and the US, the attitude towards the threat in the UK has been sanguine and low-key.

An MoD spokesmen last week insisted there had not been a case since November 2004 and it employed 'robust and stringent infection control procedures which fully meet NHS requirements adequate to deal with the problem'
.
http://observer.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,,2228205,00.html
 
E

EScotia

Guest
#2
Cue for a "we should have our own hospitals" campaign?

At least this time we could add "so we can protect the general population from getting our superbugs"!

Then again, the government would probably charge us for the free gift!
 
#3
that threatens to contaminate civilian hospitals.

Can't see that being a problem in UK hospitals. It's currently safer and cleaner to do open heart surgery in the street than in hospital.

Cue NHS managers using this to blame the shite state of thier hospitals.
 
#4
The-Lord-Flasheart said:
that threatens to contaminate civilian hospitals.

Can't see that being a problem in UK hospitals. It's currently safer and cleaner to do open heart surgery in the street than in hospital.

Cue NHS managers using this to blame the shite state of thier hospitals.
Beat me to it; if NHS managers did their fcuking jobs and made sure the fcuking hospitals were cleaned properly, we would'nt have to worry about ANY kind of superbug. :x
 
#5
Given this Gobmints record on the looking after the Forces, cue refusal to repatriate wounded service personnel to UK but treat in theatre. Afterall they wouldn't want the NHS to have to deal with "dirty soldiers". Excuse this rant but I am rapidly reaching the end of my tether with the way things are going. Got particularly pished off this morning listening to the political pundits blathering on about the lead the Tories have in the opinion polls, what fecking use is that if the Gobmint won't call an Election.
 
#6
rebel_with_a_cause said:
Given this Gobmints record on the looking after the Forces, cue refusal to repatriate wounded service personnel to UK but treat in theatre. Afterall they wouldn't want the NHS to have to deal with "dirty soldiers". Excuse this rant but I am rapidly reaching the end of my tether with the way things are going. Got particularly pished off this morning listening to the political pundits blathering on about the lead the Tories have in the opinion polls, what fecking use is that if the Gobmint won't call an Election.
And even if they did commit political suicide, the Tories are just a different colour of thieving, gutless, useless CNUTS! :evil:

Come on, Clarkson! You're country needs you to found and lead the ARRSE Party! :twisted:
 
#7
The irony is that there are plenty of Trusts and Foundation trusts that have little or no MRSA / C-Dif etc on their wards. It is achievable, it just looks like some Trusts aren't putting the effort in.

T C
 

New Posts

Top