Armed forces face radical changes under Lord Levene plans

#2
So they're basically saying that they want to give politicians all of the decision-making posts? Great. :roll:
 

OldSnowy

LE
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#4
So they're basically saying that they want to give politicians all of the decision-making posts? Great. :roll:
I do hope that this has been the case since the Restoration, and will continue to be so, in line with every other democracy in the World. Of course, they do things so much better in Egypt, N Korea, and other military dictatorships.

Politicians are elected - they tell the Armed Forces what to do.
 
#5
With a little detail
Armed forces face radical changes under Lord Levene plans

Powers and positions of senior officers under threat at a time when military is engaged in operations in Libya and Afghanistan


Lord Levene's plans for root and branch reform of the military are likely to cause consternation among senior officers.

The top tier of Britain's armed forces will be slimmed down and their power to make in-house appointments curtailed under far-reaching proposals for the restructuring of the military, the Guardian has learned.

A blueprint for the services and how they should be run is being drawn up by Lord Levene, who was appointed last year by the defence secretary, Liam Fox, and tasked with coming up with root-and-branch reforms.

Levene is due to submit his final report by the end of July, but early drafts of his main proposals, and the principles behind them, have started to circulate around Whitehall.

Though the army, Royal Navy and RAF have been bracing themselves for change, there is bound to be consternation among senior officers if some of the ideas survive consultation and are supported by Fox.

Under his current plans, Levene and his team have suggested:

• Thinning the ranks at the very top of the military. At the moment each service has, effectively, two chiefs – one responsible for strategy and management, the other for operations. Levene believes that there should only be one chief for each arm. Under this model, operational control would be pushed down the chain of command from a four star rank to a three star.

• Establishing a new appointments committee that would be responsible for choosing the highest ranking officers in the army, RAF and the Royal Navy. The committee would be chaired by a non-executive director, chosen by the defence secretary. At the moment, the services make most mid-ranking and senior appointments in-house.

• Creating a new defence board that will have only one member of the military sitting on it. This would be the overall chief of the defence staff, currently General Sir David Richards. At the moment, chiefs from all three services sit on the board.

• Getting rid of many of the other minor boards that are responsible for managing different projects. In their place, individuals would be appointed to run them, and be held accountable for delays or overspending. This would cut down on bureaucracy and save money.

• Extending the time that some officials spend in posts at MoD headquarters from two to four years. This could provide greater continuity, particularly in important areas of procurement and strategic planning.

There has been a gradual erosion of the powers of the individual service chiefs over the years, but Levene's proposals would be another step change, and mean further upheaval for the armed forces as they continue operations in Libya and Afghanistan.

The effects of last year's strategic defence and security review are still reverberating, with thousands of redundancies required from the services and the civilian side. However, some defence analysts say change at the top is overdue, and should help to reduce some of the inter-service rivalry that has bedevilled the military over the decades.

Michael Codner, director of military sciences at the Royal United Services thinktank, said that reform should have been undertaken years ago: "We have done this in a very British way. We haven't rushed in, we have tried to learn lessons so babies haven't been thrown out with the bath water. We have gone at this slowly, and perhaps we should be a lot further ahead than we are."

The change over who has final responsibility for appointments was particularly important, he said, because at the moment many talented young officers who have experience of two services are being penalised for not being "loyal to one".

"Not enough of these capable officers who have joint experiences are coming up through the chain of command. It means that some people with experience of only one service are being promoted, even if they are not as good."

Codner said that Levene's remit had been to conduct a fundamental examination of how the MoD was structured, and it would be a test of Fox's mettle to drive through any reforms. "This will require strong leadership, of the kind provided by Michael Heseltine or George Robertson, when they were at defence."

Some senior officials at the MoD admit that the three services have been "their own worst enemies" over the years and that it is time they started to work in a more collaborative way.

However, there is also genuine concern that Levene's proposals could lead to a loss of expertise at a time when all three services are involved in difficult operations abroad.
 
#6
What experience does the noble Lord Levene bring to the job?
 
#8
What experience does the noble Lord Levene bring to the job?
None at all

Lord Peter Keith Levene, Baron Levene of Portsoken KBE is the Founder of NBNK Investments PLC.

Lord Levene serves as Member of Franchise Board at Society of Lloyd's.

Lord Levene served as senior adviser at Morgan Stanley from 1996 to 1998.

He served as Chairman and Chief Executive of Canary Wharf Ltd.

He served with Wasserstein Perella.

He started his career in the Defence Industry.

He served as Personal Advisor in the Ministry of Defence, and later as Permanent Secretary ... in the role of Chief Defence Procurement for six years.

Lord Levene held a number of Government posts and was appointed as Advisor to the Prime Minister on Efficiency and Effectiveness from 1992 to 1997.

He served in various positions within the Ministry of Defense, the office of the Secretary of State for the Environment and the Ministry of Trade in the UK from 1984 to 1995.

Lord Levene serves as Chairman of Board of General Dynamics United Kingdom Limited, and NBNK Investments PLC.

He serves as Chairman of the Board of Total SA and International Financial Services.

He has been Chairman at Society of Lloyd's since November 2002.

He served as Chairman of Bankers Trust International from 1998 to 2002.

He served as Chairman of Docklands Light Railway. He served as Vice Chairman of Deutsche Bank.

Lord Levene has been a Non Executive Director of China Construction Bank Corporation since June 2006.

He serves as Director of Society of Lloyd's.

He serves as a Non-Executive Director of Haymarket Group Ltd.

He served as Senior Non Executive Director of J. Sainsbury plc., London from 2001 to September 17, 2004.

He served as Member of Supervisory Board of Deutsche Boerse AG from May 19, 2004 to April 2005.

He served as an Independent Director of Total SA. from 2005 to 2008.

He is an Alderman and Magistrate of the City of London and served as Mayor of London from 1998 to 1999.

Lord Levene received a knighthood in 1989 and became a life Peer in July 1997.
 
#9
Politicians are elected - they tell the Armed Forces what to do.
Some politicians 'Old Snowy', only some politicians.

It is right that the 'elected ones' should 'tell the Armed Forces what to do', but - should they tell the Armed Forces how to do it?

The Restoration - 351 years ago yesterday - Oak Apple Day!

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN.

PS: I am confused and saddened by the 'republican' elements nestling in the bowels of this site. Sir Peter Levene is a very distinguished man, but is he distinguished enough to measure the life of a soldier or seaman who are under fire? Probably not. He was elected though, elected to the most apolitical job in GB - Lord Mayor of London - the City of London - so hated by socialists, and not to be confused with the ordinary and political job of Mayor of London.

PPS: I do NOT recognise pretend peerages!
 
#11
I worry how our Defence Secretary is a GP/was a GP. Play to your strengths eh?
Medical doctors (as opposd to those with a Doctorate in anything) are trained amd educated in using evidence to make decisions, and analysing problems in a rational and logical way..... Note he didn't look to happy when the SDSR announcement was made by CMD.
 
#12
Given the problems we have had with bankers lately is LeVene a wise choice? And anyone with connections to MoD procurement should be hanged as a traitor. All in all we appear to have the source of the nation's problems attempting to unfuck the MoD. Hold On this could get lumpy
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#13
• Getting rid of many of the other minor boards that are responsible for managing different projects. In their place, individuals would be appointed to run them, and be held accountable for delays or overspending. This would cut down on bureaucracy and save money.
This bit certainly sounds like good idea
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
#14
Medical doctors (as opposd to those with a Doctorate in anything) are trained amd educated in using evidence to make decisions, and analysing problems in a rational and logical way..... Note he didn't look to happy when the SDSR announcement was made by CMD.
Which is why they stuck him in Defence, if he'd been given Health he would have seen through the ideologically driven, non-evidentially based so called reforms they are trying to drive through.

Andrew Lansley and his imaginary evidence – Bad Science

Why is evidence so hard for politicians? – Bad Science

I’d expect this from UKIP, or the Daily Mail. Not from a government leaflet. – Bad Science
 

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