ARM Holdings - Another one gone

#2
FFS!

Roll on the new industrial strategy Tersea May spoke of.
 
#3
Not a surprise, the weakness of the pound makes UK acquisitions especially attractive right now.

I note that SoftBank have agreed to retain the UK leadership and expand the UK business, whilst investing internationally. That sounds like good news to me.

Oh, and ARM don't supply any chips - they create and own underlying IP in a wide range of processors, which they licence to manufacturers, most (all) of which are overseas.
 
#4
It seems to show that Britain is an attractive place to buy into though. Grounds for hope and some rebuff for the worst excesses of the remainers even if it is motivated as much by a cheap £.
 
#5
This is a bit of a shame really.

However, Japanese companies tend, by and large, to keep the promises they make. Unlike some of our fellow Europeans and transatlantic cousins. And indeed our own nationals.

Time will tell.
 
#6
I bought a suitcase full of ARM on a whim about three months ago and watched it degrade to half of its value before the referendum. Suddenly, this morning I need a much bigger suitcase. Fizzy time. :)
 
#8
Some people have made serious money:
Clipboard01.jpg

...unlike wimps like me who trade in teensy weensy little purses. That's ^ the sort of graph that gets your trousers wet.
 
Last edited:
#9
ARM are designers.

You cant just buy the company because without the designers the company is effectively worthless. Someone has made a pretty penny out of it but at what cost?
 
#10
OUTRAGEOUS!!!!!!

"ARM said it would keep its headquarters in Cambridge and that it would at least double the number of its staff over the next five years."



Japan invests in the UK post BREXIT!

I demand another referendum!
 
#13
ARM chipmaker to be bought for £24bn by Japan's Softbank - BBC News

The British company that has a virtual monopoly on supplying the microchips that go into smartphones is being sold off to the Japanese.

If there's only one thing left that the British still do well, then it's asset stripping.
So the company is staying in business, employees are keeping their jobs and they plan on expanding the workforce in the UK. You are a bit shit at this outrage stuff
 
#14
It seems to show that Britain is an attractive place to buy into though. Grounds for hope and some rebuff for the worst excesses of the remainers even if it is motivated as much by a cheap £.
Except it's not a manufacturing company, as pointed out earlier. It doesn't need to import raw materials, and it doesn't need to worry about tariffs affecting the goods that it produces.

It's not like making cars - success or failure in the chip industry is all about time to market, and that depends on having enough skilled people on the various project teams, to get the right designs to the right quality at the right time. Cock that up, and customers start wondering "can ARM guarantee us the capability we need for our next-generation phone?" at which point someone like Intel gets their nose in the door by promising that their new chip is just the job for the problem at hand.

Take Wolfson Microelectronics - thought they were the Dog's Bollocks because they got their parts into the first Xbox and some of the early iPods. Then they fell behind the design curve - lost slots in products (they weren't used in the Xbox One or later iPods); stress and layoffs; and eventually a purchase of the remainder by Cirrus. Not as many jobs there now as there were once...

Where ARM might suffer is if it can't actually get another couple of thousand engineers to move to Cambridge - finding high-quality digital designers is damn difficult. We had enough trouble in my last job just getting an extra ten engineers with a very similar specialist skillset, and ended up having to recruit Europe-wide.

The wife's mob, meanwhile, is trying to attract the right person with the right skills to a key role in her team - unfortunately, the job offer was to an EU citizen currently based in Dublin and he has just turned them down because BREXIT means uncertainty.

If there's no certainty as to the post-BREXIT right-to-movement situation, why risk a career / mortgage / childrens' education on the current unpredictable mess?
 
Last edited:
#15
I'm suddenly reminded that we have both an original Xbox and an original iPod in the family and both are still working just as well as when they came out of the box, unlike their successors which are bricked. Hmm.
 
#16
So the company is staying in business, employees are keeping their jobs and they plan on expanding the workforce in the UK. You are a bit shit at this outrage stuff
Sssshhh

I understand it's another British company gets taken over that's sad for some. Yes, valid point too & that the pound is low but very investment attractive.

It's not rocket science and well known many UK companies are overseas owned (plenty research available, I know) sole UK companies are in the whole, in the minority, however:

UK investment post Brexit-check
Workforce to increase-check
R&D unaffected and continues-check
No Management takeover-check

No other UK based company is at loss over this or interested due to capital expenditure, it's a cruel real world but unfortunately it's been happening for years, look at the football clubs and utility companies for example.
 
#17
We're having problems finding 2 decent process safety specialists even offering decent money. I wounder where they will find a hundred or so computer chip & machine code specialists?
 
#18
We're having problems finding 2 decent process safety specialists even offering decent money. I wounder where they will find a hundred or so computer chip & machine code specialists?
From all those vocal students who are constantly out protesting....oh wait, the useless twats are studying socialogy.
 
#19
OP you need to improve you wrist lock technique to stop them getting away !







Oh, not that sort of arm holdings !
 

Similar threads

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top