Ark Royal landings

#5
Whats the prop driven plane at 5min 50 secs with wings folded ?
 
#8
The phantoms have leading edge slats, which do the same sort of job as flaps, increasing the camber angle of the wing, giving increased lift at slower airspeeds.
The prop driven jobbie at 5. 50 on the video is a Fairey Gannett, providing airbourne early warning for the fleet until the scrapping of the carriers. The radar lived on though, in the Avro Shackleton AEW.

RP
 
#9
trooper142 said:
Whats the prop driven plane at 5min 50 secs with wings folded ?
I'm very tempted to say a Fairy Gannet, but thought those were pretty much gone by the end of the 60s - so wait to be corrected :)

edit: due to leaving my computer for 10 minutes I've already been beaten to it, twice! Sorry...
 
#11
Dashing_Chap said:
I believe it is a Gannet:



-DC
Interestingly (or not) there is a pretty well restored Gannet at a pretty tiny aviation museum in Wokingham, Berkshire. Originally set up basically on the site of the Miles aviation works. Not only do they have a Gannet but also a full Handley Page Herald.

Most of the rest of their stuff is pretty scrappy, but they work hard!

Back to the original; that's some damn fine CGI for the 70s. How did they manage to make all those aircraft? I mean, we all know you never see more than two jets or three helis in the same place.
 
#12
As a follow up to crabby's restored Gannett, I am sure that I saw one along with a few other frames, poking out of a hedge in Cirencester on the route of the old A419. This was many years ago, am I cracking up or does anybody else know of these?

RP
 
#13
The RN used two types of Gannet, crabby, and you're partly right about them going.

The Gannet started life as an ASW aircraft, though, and this version looked a bit different:



The majority of the ASW Gannets went in the 1960s when helicopters took over the ASW role; the trainer versions remained in use, as did the Carrier On Board delivery conversions of the Gannet AS4.

The AEW3, though, stayed in use until the demise of the Ark Royal.
 
#15
There's a Gannet in perfect condition at the Luftwaffenmuseum at the former RAF Gatow . The mail with the link was forwarded to me by a friend who used to be a KC-135 pilot for SR-71 refuelling and what was intriguing was the bit at the very end of the mail...
"Subject: British Carrier landings............
The Brits approach to flying is a bit different than we do. In 1964 a couple of us were sent out to the boat from Pensacola to wave the Lightning (over and under engines) during some hot weather sea trials. First we learned that they consider the LSO just a good looking wheels watch, they spot the deck. We had to remove the number one wire to stop them from smashing the PLAT camera with the hooks. For a cat shot they would raise the nose up about ten degrees. This gave them a flying angle of attack, without that the plane would just sink and skip off the water. They did some single engine cat shots. this was done by just shutting one engine down. Don't know if they have great engineers or are just stupid. Darrell..."

I will try and find out more.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#16
LIGHTNING???????????? I rather doubt it.
 
#17
RigPig said:
As a follow up to crabby's restored Gannett, I am sure that I saw one along with a few other frames, poking out of a hedge in Cirencester on the route of the old A419. This was many years ago, am I cracking up or does anybody else know of these?

RP
Definitely remember that Gannet - dunno what happened to it tho'.
 
#18
Can't get the video to work. However, apart from nostalgia I can't help thinking:

1. The hard part in naval aviation is landing back on the ship. This is part of the reason why the UK has opted for the F35B to reduce the training problems, and so much work is taking place such as the VAAC development work - as reported here. Once again the UK is at the front of technology!

I really don't think the Lightening would have been suitable for carrier operation.

2. Ark Royal (IV) had a crowded flight deck, with lots of aircraft (both fixed wing and rotary wing) moving about, launching and landing. The experience and expertise of managing that meant that when the Falklands War came along Hermes and Invincible were both able to cope with having more aircraft embarked than they werse designed for.

3. With new carriers on the horizon, we should be ramping up our flight deck capabilities. Indeed there have been occasions where one of our present carriers has had sixteen or more Sea Harriers and Harriers embarked. Also, the Sea Harrier has been retired early.

This decision was discussed in lots of places like PPRuNe - particularly:

Sea Jet - PPRuNe Forums

This was one of the issues raised, in fact it was pointed out to me by someone experienced in carrier operations. Since then things have got worse, with the RN struggling to find Harriers to embark.

I apolegise for posting a link to PPRuNe but this thread is about naval aviation and this particular issue has been discussed there. Unfortunately it would appear some of the predictions regarding skill loss and the issue of "jets on the deck" have been proved right. Naturally it also also mention in the Future Carrier thread.

The run down of the Fleet Air Arm in the 70s meant that using fighters to defend a task force from air attack had not been properly practised for many years prior to 1982. Like the lack of AEW this was to have lethal consequences.

Do we learn from our mistakes? It would appear not.
 
#19
seaweed said:
LIGHTNING???????????? I rather doubt it.
I sent a mail requesting more info and will post what comes back.Although I have seen all manner of aircraft launched from carriers on documentaries, two aircraft I couldn't imagine being launched are the Lightning and the Starfighter.
A lot of aircraft I could picture being launched and not landing but in those two cases I doubt if a launch was possible.
 
#20
spoiltb said:
seaweed said:
LIGHTNING???????????? I rather doubt it.
I sent a mail requesting more info and will post what comes back.Although I have seen all manner of aircraft launched from carriers on documentaries, two aircraft I couldn't imagine being launched are the Lightning and the Starfighter.
A lot of aircraft I could picture being launched and not landing but in those two cases I doubt if a launch was possible.
German Navy bought 132 starfighters, so assuming they were launched and landed in some way!

Although I agree on the lightening - would there be any reason to do it?
 

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