Argentinian Fighters from WW2

TheAssassin

War Hero
A Reuters article about Argentinians who fought for the Allies in WW2 (mostly with RCAF and RAF). The last paragraphs made mention that some of those pilots volunteered and had a role during the Falklands Conflict.

quote -
The end of the war did not mark the end of everyone’s fighting career. When Britain and Argentina went to war in 1982 over the Falkland Islands (known as the Malvinas in Argentina) some veterans volunteered to fight again.

Meunier says a few flew diversion flights near the British fleet while others commanded cargo planes carrying troops to the islands.

“People in World War Two wanted to keep the world free. They didn’t want Hitler to take over Argentina. They were fighting for others,” he said. “In the Malvinas, they were fighting for Argentina.”



The full Rueters article here Argentine pilots break silence over World War Two
 
Wasn't Argentina one of the favoured sanctuaries for senior Nazis fleeing prosecution?
There was a fairly sizeable population of German heritage in Argentina before the war (they're something like the fourth or fifth largest ethnic grouping), so it was an obvious place for senior Nazis to try to hide. IIRC, it wasn't just Nazis escaping justice who rocked up there, but quite a lot of Germans who decided that they didn't want to stick around in a ruined Germany (particularly the East) and headed for sunnier climes, knowing that they could fit in quickly and not even needing to learn a new language to do so. There was (possibly still is) at least one German language national newspaper in the country.

Sadly, it appears that the Nazi element influenced the likes of those ****s Patricio Dowling and Alfredo Astiz rather too well....
 

TheAssassin

War Hero
Wasn't Argentina one of the favoured sanctuaries for senior Nazis fleeing prosecution?
Yes, but during the war itself, there were still some young Argentines willing and able to fight the enemy (Axis powers), which is what the main article was about. This thread is about those that fought against us over The Falklands
 
Wasn't Argentina one of the favoured sanctuaries for senior Nazis fleeing prosecution?
Yes , but it also had a massive British population involved in the railways , farming , meat and cereal exports , banking , insurance and communications .
Till 1930 , it was effectively a British economic colony , but without a garrison .
When the war came along , over 3,500 men and women with dual nationalities volunteered for the British forces ( a few German dual nationals and many Italians did the same for the other side ) .
164 Squadron was an Anglo Argentine squadron , a fact recognised by the fact that it 's the only squadron whose motto is in Spanish , not latin .

They also served in every branch of the RAF and produced a few aces .
Johnnie Stower , one of the 50 Great Escapers that were shot , was an Argentine

One family , the Decks , lost all three sons and their mother lost her mind .

When General Peron came to power in 1948 , he , like any good fascist recognised you have to have an enemy to point the people's hatred at , and the British naturally fitted the bill .
Of all the immigrant communities , they were not only the wealthiest , but also aloof , arrogant and not inclined to mix with wops and dagos , so Peron found no trouble in getting the masses behind him in getting rid of their influence .
He began by nationalizing the railways , which meant a lot of the Brits went home . he then had thugs burn down the Belgrano Cricket Club and the Jockey Club . A lot of the British either quietly went home or simply wound their necks in and rode out the storm
Their is still an anglo community out there , including several schools , but it's not as exlusive as it once was , and a lot of people with British surnames don't even speak English .
 
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Wasn't Argentina one of the favoured sanctuaries for senior Nazis fleeing prosecution?
Not all were lucky enough to be picked up by T-Force or Operation Paperclip were they?
 
Yes, but not fully against the Axis though?
The British population in Argentina were totally against the Axis .
Punch ups between Brits and Germans on a Friday night in downtown Buenos Aires were legendary .
The biggest Nazi rally outside Germany was held at the Luna Park Stadium , Buenos Aires , in 1938
1585578745216.png


Argentina maintained a careful neutrality during the war , which Churchill and the Americans encouraged , as Argentine ships were less likely to be torpedoed bringing wheat and frozen beef across the Atlantic .
The British owned Blue Star Line , on the other hand , lost most of it's ships on the South America route to German submarines and the Graff Spee
 

4(T)

LE
A Reuters article about Argentinians who fought for the Allies in WW2 (mostly with RCAF and RAF). The last paragraphs made mention that some of those pilots volunteered and had a role during the Falklands Conflict.

quote -
The end of the war did not mark the end of everyone’s fighting career. When Britain and Argentina went to war in 1982 over the Falkland Islands (known as the Malvinas in Argentina) some veterans volunteered to fight again.

Meunier says a few flew diversion flights near the British fleet while others commanded cargo planes carrying troops to the islands.

“People in World War Two wanted to keep the world free. They didn’t want Hitler to take over Argentina. They were fighting for others,” he said. “In the Malvinas, they were fighting for Argentina.”

The full Rueters article here Argentine pilots break silence over World War Two


These guys would have been in their 60s during the Falklands War. How many of them were even active in-date pilots and in a position to "volunteer" to fly ops?


The WW2 aspect deserves coverage, but the latter claim seems a bit dubious.
 
Sometime in 1948 , Peron ramped up the ante with his first demand for the return of " Las Malvinas " , that festering wound of colonialism , blah , blah that every despotic world leader chanted in those days .
The people , being a hot blooded mixture of disgruntled Italians raised on tango songs , all of which are about getting f*cked over , agreed with him and have gone on and on and on about those f8cking islands ever since
This was at a time when WE owed THEM a not inconsiderable sum of money for all the bread and corned beef they sent over in the war , and thus the seeds of the 1982 conflict were sown .
 
These guys would have been in their 60s during the Falklands War. How many of them were even active in-date pilots and in a position to "volunteer" to fly ops?


The WW2 aspect deserves coverage, but the latter claim seems a bit dubious.
On the other hand the onset of Glaucoma, myopia, cataracts etc may explain why the occasional dead penguin was frequently mistaken for HMS Invincible dead in the water and aflame

edit for typo
 
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These guys would have been in their 60s during the Falklands War. How many of them were even active in-date pilots and in a position to "volunteer" to fly ops?


The WW2 aspect deserves coverage, but the latter claim seems a bit dubious.
I know of two who flew in the Phoenix squadron , in Lear jets and 707's .
A lot of the ex RAF pilots served in the state airline , Aerolineas Argentinas , but none joined the Argentine Air Force , despite generous offers to do so , as Peron bought them Lancasters , Lincoln's and Gloster meteors , and they needed experienced pilots as instructors
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Led by Bear Grylls' grandfather, a 15th/19th Hussar.


Following the debacle in Belgium,

Now many officers came back to us - Lieutenant Colonel W. R. N. Hinde to command the Regiment, from hospital where he had been since being wounded in Belgium; Major R. L. Agnew from 1 Northamptonshire Yeomanry to be Second in Command; Major W. E. H. Grylls from RMC Sandhurst to command A Squadron
The History of 15th/19th The King's Royal Hussars
1939-1945
by
Major G. Courage DSO
Late 15th/19th The King's Royal Hussars
 
Here is some grainy footage of ex RAF Meteors , Lancs and Lincolns in Argentine service .
The one that looks like a Mosquito / Beaufighter hybrid was locally designed and built
 
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TheAssassin

War Hero
On the other the onset of Glaucoma, myopia, cataracts etc may explain why the occasional dead penguin was frequently mistaken for HMS Invincible dead in the water and aflame
The article did say that they volunteered for the Falklands, not necessarily as active
 
Here is some grainy footage of ex RAF Meteors , Lancs and Lincoln's in Argentine service .
The one that looks like a Mosquito / Beaufighter hybrid was locally designed and built
The I.Ae.24 Calquin
 

Slime

LE
We need to ask Ricky D Philips, he‘s never been there of course but is the leading Falklands expert :)
 

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