Argentine sub has gone missing.

Seems there's some doubt:
<blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">It&#39;s just an eroded soft rock possibly due to some kind of underwater current. <a href="Ocean Infinity (@Ocean__Infinity) on Twitter">@Ocean__Infinity</a> are morons and I will finish this sick company soon. <a href="#ARASanJuan hashtag on Twitter">#ARASanJuan</a> <a href="Emil Enchev on Twitter">pic.twitter.com/EqDaTCbfhJ</a></p>&mdash; Emil Enchev (@Enchev_EG) <a href="">November 17, 2018</a></blockquote> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
 
Why do the conspiracy theorists seem unable to simply pipe down and let the families get some closure? Is their agenda really worth it?
 
Why do the conspiracy theorists seem unable to simply pipe down and let the families get some closure? Is their agenda really worth it?
Their agenda is to create and maintain the notion that they are the clever, astute, big thinkers and everybody else needs to ‘wake up sheeple’.

They are at best, easily mocked dumplings, at worst, horrible, ridiculous quarterwits.

Across the spectrum, they know nothing about anything.
 
From here: Ocean Infinity locates the missing Argentinian submarine, ARA San Juan - Ocean Infinity
Note my bold.

Ocean Infinity locates the missing Argentinian submarine, ARA San Juan

17/11/2018

Ocean Infinity, the seabed exploration company, confirms that it has found ARA San Juan, the Argentine Navy submarine which was lost on 15 November 2017.
In the early hours of 17 November, after two months of seabed search, Ocean Infinity located what has now been confirmed as the wreckage of the ARA San Juan. The submarine was found in a ravine in 920m of water, approximately 600 km east of Comodoro Rivadavia in the Atlantic Ocean.
Oliver Plunkett, Ocean Infinity’s CEO, said:
“Our thoughts are with the many families affected by this terrible tragedy. We sincerely hope that locating the resting place of the ARA San Juan will be of some comfort to them at what must be a profoundly difficult time. Furthermore, we hope our work will lead to their questions being answered and lessons learned which help to prevent anything similar from happening again.
We have received a huge amount of help from many parties who we would like to thank. We are particularly grateful to the Argentinian Navy whose constant support and encouragement was invaluable. In addition, the United Kingdom’s Royal Navy, via the UK Ambassador in Buenos Aires, made a very significant contribution. Numerous others, including the US Navy’s Supervisor of Salvage and Diving, have supported us with expert opinion and analysis. Finally, I would like to extend a special thank you to the whole Ocean Infinity team, especially those offshore as well as our project leaders Andy Sherrell and Nick Lambert, who have all worked tirelessly for this result.”

Ocean Infinity used five Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) to carry out the search, which was conducted by a team of approximately 60 crew members on board Seabed Constructor. In addition, three officers of the Argentine Navy and four family members of the crew of the ARA San Juan joined Seabed Constructor to observe the search operation.
Ocean Infinity had committed to conduct the search operation for up to sixty days, and to take on the economic risk of the search, only receiving payment if the submarine was found.
Ocean Infinity’s permanently mobilised ocean search capability is the most technologically advanced in the world. Their AUV’s are capable of operating in water depths from 5 meters to 6,000 meters and covering vast areas of the seabed at unparalleled speed. The AUVs are not tethered to their host vessel during operations, allowing them to go deeper and collect higher quality data for the search. They are equipped with a variety of tools including side scan sonar, a multi-beam echo-sounder HD camera, and synthetic aperture sonar. In addition, from the host vessel, Ocean Infinity is able to deploy two work class ROVs and heavy lifting equipment capable of retrieving objects weighing up to 45T from 6000m.
 
Seems there's some doubt:
<blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">It&#39;s just an eroded soft rock possibly due to some kind of underwater current. <a href="Ocean Infinity (@Ocean__Infinity) on Twitter">@Ocean__Infinity</a> are morons and I will finish this sick company soon. <a href="#ARASanJuan hashtag on Twitter">#ARASanJuan</a> <a href="Emil Enchev on Twitter">pic.twitter.com/EqDaTCbfhJ</a></p>&mdash; Emil Enchev (@Enchev_EG) <a href="">November 17, 2018</a></blockquote> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

No doubt now, Argentine Navy showing footage of the wreck.

At least the families have some comfort now.
 
No doubt now, Argentine Navy showing footage of the wreck.

At least the families have some comfort now.
Good that it's been found. It's a help to know where.
I'm probably going to be shot down for this, but why is the exact place such a comfort nowadays?
There must be thousands of families who have lost loved ones at sea with no known resting place.
U-Boats, Merchant Navy Convoys, Hood, Russian Convoys, Mediterranean Convoys and actions, fishermen the world over, the list is endless going back to Trafalgar, Spanish Armada, Salamis and Troy and beyond. Let's not mention all those missing in action on the ground and air with no known resting place.

Estos muchachos (Those blokes) served and died when they probably shouldn't have done because of government negligence.

I just can't see that finding exactly where they are can get over the loss of what happened or help in any real way.
If that's just me being hard-hearted and non-comprehending then I'll accept the flak. But are we carrying this maybe too far? Now there will be a constant pressure to raise the boat, find out exactly what happened and blame somebody rather than letting servicemen rest in peace.
 
Good that it's been found. It's a help to know where.
I'm probably going to be shot down for this, but why is the exact place such a comfort nowadays?
There must be thousands of families who have lost loved ones at sea with no known resting place.
U-Boats, Merchant Navy Convoys, Hood, Russian Convoys, Mediterranean Convoys and actions, fishermen the world over, the list is endless going back to Trafalgar, Spanish Armada, Salamis and Troy and beyond. Let's not mention all those missing in action on the ground and air with no known resting place.

Estos muchachos (Those blokes) served and died when they probably shouldn't have done because of government negligence.

I just can't see that finding exactly where they are can get over the loss of what happened or help in any real way.
If that's just me being hard-hearted and non-comprehending then I'll accept the flak. But are we carrying this maybe too far? Now there will be a constant pressure to raise the boat, find out exactly what happened and blame somebody rather than letting servicemen rest in peace.
That is a sound post.
It is not as if the families are going to race out there on a weekly/monthly basis and visit the site to place fresh flowers on the grave.
 
That is a sound post.
It is not as if the families are going to race out there on a weekly/monthly basis and visit the site to place fresh flowers on the grave.
Thank you
 
Having never been In the situation where someone close has died and not knowing where the body is I can only assume, it is a step in the final closure process. If the location of the body is known then without a doubt the next step will be the need to recover it and bring it home. I have no doubt that there are people who will never, or find it difficult to, accept someone is dead until they see the body. Just another example of how complex us humans are.
 
Good that it's been found. It's a help to know where.
I'm probably going to be shot down for this, but why is the exact place such a comfort nowadays?
There must be thousands of families who have lost loved ones at sea with no known resting place.
U-Boats, Merchant Navy Convoys, Hood, Russian Convoys, Mediterranean Convoys and actions, fishermen the world over, the list is endless going back to Trafalgar, Spanish Armada, Salamis and Troy and beyond. Let's not mention all those missing in action on the ground and air with no known resting place.

Estos muchachos (Those blokes) served and died when they probably shouldn't have done because of government negligence.

I just can't see that finding exactly where they are can get over the loss of what happened or help in any real way.
If that's just me being hard-hearted and non-comprehending then I'll accept the flak. But are we carrying this maybe too far? Now there will be a constant pressure to raise the boat, find out exactly what happened and blame somebody rather than letting servicemen rest in peace.
Part of the answer must be that until recently it wouldn't have been possible to find a vessel under these circumstances. Now that it's possible, authorities may feel a duty to do it and others may feel that they have such a duty.

Another part of the answer is that we can't tell someone else what will and won't make their grief easier to bear. Most relatives do say that having a body to bury, or if that's not possible then knowing where the body is, makes all the difference. They have certainty, can grieve "normally" and can start the healing process. There's a phenomenon known as "ambiguous loss" that often affects people who know intellectually that their relative is dead, but don't really feel that they're a "bereaved person" without either a body or certainty as to where that body is. The ICRC has an article: The agony and the uncertainty: Missing loved ones and ambiguous loss, with links to more academic background.
 
Part of the answer must be that until recently it wouldn't have been possible to find a vessel under these circumstances. Now that it's possible, authorities may feel a duty to do it and others may feel that they have such a duty.

Another part of the answer is that we can't tell someone else what will and won't make their grief easier to bear. Most relatives do say that having a body to bury, or if that's not possible then knowing where the body is, makes all the difference. They have certainty, can grieve "normally" and can start the healing process. There's a phenomenon known as "ambiguous loss" that often affects people who know intellectually that their relative is dead, but don't really feel that they're a "bereaved person" without either a body or certainty as to where that body is. The ICRC has an article: The agony and the uncertainty: Missing loved ones and ambiguous loss, with links to more academic background.
I take the point and understand it. The article to me is saying that when you don't know where they are makes it harder to close. Once you know then it helps, and I can see that.
Yet I just wonder how much modern coverage of tragedies has made it essential to have that. The previous generations managed to find their coming to terms with similar events, and I think perhaps we have maybe gone too far along the media coverage of milking the grief scenario.

I'm not trying to take anything away from the families, and a burial on home ground may well be a help, that I understand, it's just I really would like to get on with my life rather than hanging onto something like this and I'm sure the deceased would want the families to do so.
 
I take the point and understand it. The article to me is saying that when you don't know where they are makes it harder to close. Once you know then it helps, and I can see that.
Yet I just wonder how much modern coverage of tragedies has made it essential to have that. The previous generations managed to find their coming to terms with similar events, and I think perhaps we have maybe gone too far along the media coverage of milking the grief scenario.

I'm not trying to take anything away from the families, and a burial on home ground may well be a help, that I understand, it's just I really would like to get on with my life rather than hanging onto something like this and I'm sure the deceased would want the families to do so.
Another very sound post.
 
Now that they know where the wreck is they may assess whether they can send down cameras to view the damage and see if that gives any clue as to the cause of the accident.
 
Why do the conspiracy theorists seem unable to simply pipe down and let the families get some closure? Is their agenda really worth it?
I remember after the FV Gaul was lost off Norway in 1974 for years storied circulated that it was a spy ship and that the Russians had boarded her and carted the crew back to Russia. Even after the wreck was located and remains found the conspiracy theories continued. I saw a TV show about ten years back where an utter gobshite TV psychic was telling a daughter of one of the crew that her dad was alive and living in Russia with his new family.

FV Gaul - Wikipedia
 
Now that they know where the wreck is they may assess whether they can send down cameras to view the damage and see if that gives any clue as to the cause of the accident.
Had cameras down already.

Pictures of sunken vessels always melancholic for me. RIP
 
Once news is out that one of the missing Estos muchachos is a minority single parent pre op' transgender LGBT homosexual Stoker who knew a Grenfell resident, heaven and earth will be moved to lift the sub'.
 
Last edited:
I know Argentina has said it "Lacks the Means" to raise the submarine but putting that aside, how on earth do you go about bringing something that big at the reported depth to the surface.
 
Sad as it is for families that have loved ones lost in the disaster, IMO, it wouldn't be a patch on the grief that would be felt if their family member couldn't be found while others were retrieved.

There are some circumstances when "Rest in Peace" is the most appropriate course of action.
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top