Argentine 601 commando company wiki question

Discussion in 'The Intelligence Cell' started by petergriffen, Feb 18, 2010.

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  1. Ok I don't know if this is a good place for this or not (thought it might be a little off for the history section). But this is on the wiki page of the 601 CC in relation to the Falklands war.

    The Harrier shoot down seems to be varified, but the SAS/3 Para bit's I don't think I have read about in any books of the war....I may be entirely wrong of course :?
     
  2. I certainly remember reading an account of a 3 PARA Patrols Plt callsign having to bug out of an OP while in contact with a larger Argentine Force. They had to bug out sharpish and had to leave behind their bergans etc.
    This was sometime during the run up to the Battle of Mt Longdon.
     
  3. IIRC Many Branch was where Gavin Hamilton was killed.
     
  4. Still can't remember what book i read it in but heres a bit of info from wiki reference the 3 PARA patrol..................................

    3 Para set up a patrol base near Murrell Bridge, two kilometres west of Mount Longdon on 3 June. From there they sent out their specialist patrols from D Company to scout out the Argentine positions on Mount Longdon. An example of a snatch patrol that failed to obtain a prisoner was provided by 3 PARA on the night of 4-5 June 1982. A three-man patrol from D Company consisting of Corporal Jerry Phillips and Privates Richard Absolon and Bill Hayward was sent out to the northern slopes of Mount Longdon. The small party was detailed to penetrate Sub-Lieutenant Juan Baldini's 1st Platoon on the western slopes to secure a prisoner, supported to their rear by a battery of six 105 mm field guns, under cover of which the specialist snipers shot at Baldini while another fired a 66 at one of the 1st Platoon mortar pits under Corporal Óscar Carrizo. The Argentine commanders reacted vigorously, and the sniper team found themselves under prompt and accurate machinegun, artillery and mortar fire. There were no Argentine casualties. One British participant nevertheless claimed to have shot and killed two Argentines and demolished one mortar crew with a 66 mm anti-tank rocket at close range. [3]

    On the Argentine side, it was soon realised that the 7th Infantry Regiment Reconnaissance Platoon soldiers on the surrounding Wireless Ridge position were ill equipped to carry out their own patrolling. Thus, the Argentine Commando units, normally used for deep-recce had to take on this role. They were able to do so with some success and in the early hours of 7 June a combined patrol of the 601st Commando Company and 601st National Gendarmerie Special Forces Squadron was seen approaching Murrell Bridge. After several nights in the area Corporals Paul Haddon and Peter Brown and their patrols had just arrived at the bluff on the western bank of the Murrell River which Sergeant Ian Addle's patrol had been using as a base. Within a short space of time a sentry reported moving figures down near the bridge. The Paras opened up and a confused firefight developed in the darkness, with small arms, machinegun, LAW and Energa rifle grenades being exchanged. The Commando patrol under Captain Rubén Figueroa was very aggressive and before dawn had forced the Paras to withdraw, having to leave behind much of their equipment. Only one Argentine NCO was slightly wounded during the counter-ambush. From then on patrols had to be mounted closer to their own line. As the official history of the Parachute Regiment acknowledged:

    'They were forced to evacuate their position rapidly, leaving behind their packs and radio, but succeeded in withdrawing without suffering any casualties. The location was checked on the evening of 8 June by another patrol, but there was no sign of the packs or radio, which meant the battalion's radio net could have been compromised.'[4]
     
  5. [

    'They were forced to evacuate their position rapidly, leaving behind their packs and radio, but succeeded in withdrawing without suffering any casualties. The location was checked on the evening of 8 June by another patrol, but there was no sign of the packs or radio, which meant the battalion's radio net could have been compromised.'[4][/quote]

    I remember that in 2 Para ptls platoon we had to change OTP codes because of this. A mate in 3 Para did an exchange trip to Argentina about 10 years ago and in the regimental museum of the hosting unit was the 3 para ptls radio ops bergen and personal kit laid out in a display cabinet. They tried to convince him to come parachuting with them but he politely declined!