Are All Pitbull Owners Mongs?

Tool

LE
My folks used to keep golden retrievers.
Had a few litters, sold them on, but then they became trendy.
Fortunately the kennel union, which oversees breeding, gives out family trees back about 9 generations.
Potential stud or dam was examined, and kennel names compared. If too much commonality then a dog shagging session was off.
However, some folk wanted cute puppies, not pedigree. And some breeders didn't care.
Just like humans ... Think inbred types like Cornwall, Norfolk and house of Windsor... As soon as you start putting cousins with cousins you get problems.

I'm sure most pitbull, rottweiler etc hounds have severe issues. Because they aren't bred according to guidelines.
It is VERY LARGELY down to the owners. The best-mannered animals I ever dealt with (apart form our current Goldie) were "Hey You" and "Hey You"'s Mother - both Rotties, both big buggers. Well-trained and kept under control by their owner. That is the difference.
 
It is VERY LARGELY down to the owners. The best-mannered animals I ever dealt with (apart form our current Goldie) were "Hey You" and "Hey You"'s Mother - both Rotties, both big buggers. Well-trained and kept under control by their owner. That is the difference.
I have strong views about all dog owners who believe they have a God-given right to let their dog do whatever it wants because, 'it's a member of the family'

No it isn't, it is an animal that needs food, shelter, and proper training.

Any dog with jaws strong enough to rip someone apart should not be bred.

Sadly more children will die as a result of dog attacks until the breed is wiped out.

Next.
 
The softest breed of dog can get in a killing frenzy when with other dogs and sheep are on the scene , they chase the sheep down to exhaustion and they keel over ,I once had to collect around 12 dead sheep , some with half aborted lambs hanging out of them , this was after I`d shot two of the dogs , a lab and a collie if I remember right , obviously the dog owners , respectable people, were devastated and didnt believe their dogs would do such a thing but the trailer of dead ewes gave them a reality check, a large invoice followed the bad news.
 

Chef

LE
It is VERY LARGELY down to the owners. The best-mannered animals I ever dealt with (apart form our current Goldie) were "Hey You" and "Hey You"'s Mother - both Rotties, both big buggers. Well-trained and kept under control by their owner. That is the difference.
This every time, the number of times one hears owners saying,

'He's just being friendly' As some large mutt is battering someone against a wall shows it's a prevalent view that their large dog isn't intimidating or badly trained. Idiots.
 
The softest breed of dog can get in a killing frenzy when with other dogs and sheep are on the scene , they chase the sheep down to exhaustion and they keel over ,I once had to collect around 12 dead sheep , some with half aborted lambs hanging out of them , this was after I`d shot two of the dogs , a lab and a collie if I remember right , obviously the dog owners , respectable people, were devastated and didnt believe their dogs would do such a thing but the trailer of dead ewes gave them a reality check, a large invoice followed the bad news.
Does that include Labradoodles? From what I've seen of them they are soft as a brush.
 

scoldog

On ROPS
On ROPs
It is VERY LARGELY down to the owners. The best-mannered animals I ever dealt with (apart form our current Goldie) were "Hey You" and "Hey You"'s Mother - both Rotties, both big buggers. Well-trained and kept under control by their owner. That is the difference.
Neighbour of mine had a rottie a few years ago. It was a rescue dog and the biggest softie I ever met.

He told me one day that some bloke jumped his back fence and tried to break into his house, not realising the his mother was in the house with the dog. When the bloke got the back door open, the dog went berserk and chased the bloke for his life. Thankfully he cleared the fence.

I was surprised when hearing this. This was the same dog that got out one weekend while my neighbour was mowing his front lawn. We found the dog across the road at the netball courts getting belly rubs from all the little girls that were on the side lines.
 
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Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Neighbour of mine had a rottie a few years ago. It was a rescue dog and the biggest softie I ever met.

He told me one day that some bloke jumped his back fence and tried to break into his house, not realising the his mother was in the house with the dog. When the bloke got the back door open, the dog went berserk and chased the bloke for his life. Thankfully he cleared the fence.

I was surprised when hearing this. This was the same dog that got out one weekend while my neighbour was mowing his front lawn. We found the dog across the road at the netball courts getting belly rubs from all the little girls that were on the side lines.
I guy I knew many years back used to train Rotts as guard dogs.

These things were 'orrible. They could run at 20+ mph and bite out the sidewalls of tyres, so making it to a vehicle was no guarantee of getting away.

A bunch of ex-Them who were in the security/surveiilance business once asked him to come along as they wanted to demonstrate their abilities in terms of covert entry. His dogs had run all of them to ground within minutes and the Them's principal admitted that unless the dog and its handler can be taken out at the same instant being truly covert is very difficult.

That same guy had a three year-old daughter. If one of the dogs was lying in the way of the TV, it could get a slap on the rump off her and move uncomplainingly. There was a distinct pecking order.

It's very much about how animals are kept.
 

DSJ

LE
There's always a risk if you take a dog that has been bred for a purpose and you place it in an environment where it lacks that purpose, and/or or is not trained in an appropriate manner.

When I was living in London, a friend wanted to have a dog and said she wanted a collie. She lived in a pokey wee flat and worked in an office. I advised her very strongly to in no way entertain the idea - collies are known to self-harm out of stress/frustration.

Another friend has a Belgian Malinois - and it's an awesome dog, but great care has been taken to train it correctly and appropriately, including bite training - so it knows when biting is an appropriate response. The dog is a big softy with me and just wants to be challenged/worked, or to have attention. But I would not cross it - the crossover from big souk on your feet to immediate, teeth-baring, stand-to alertness is something to behold.
 
The family of my daughter's boyfriend had a Staffordshire Bull terrier, an absolute unit of a dog that looked like it could swallow a Volvo. A big mouth and shoulders with a tail attached. He was like something from a cartoon you'd expect to run through a fence and leave a dog shaped hole in it.

He was an absolute bruiser to look at and the softest, daft thing you could imagine.
He loved people and always wanted to make friends with you and have a fuss.

Dog's are a mirror of the environment they live in, and spectacularly tattooed F'wits with a land shark called Satan or some such are a complete menace.
 
The softest breed of dog can get in a killing frenzy when with other dogs and sheep are on the scene , they chase the sheep down to exhaustion and they keel over ,I once had to collect around 12 dead sheep , some with half aborted lambs hanging out of them , this was after I`d shot two of the dogs , a lab and a collie if I remember right , obviously the dog owners , respectable people, were devastated and didnt believe their dogs would do such a thing but the trailer of dead ewes gave them a reality check, a large invoice followed the bad news.
I lived on Arran for all the school breaks through the late 50's & 60's.
Worked a bit helping the farmer out for a bit of pin money..feeding livestock etc.
I recall vividly witnessing what you have described and it's a vision to this day that puts the hairs up the back of the neck. It involved 2 Great Danes. You will imagine. I think they slaughtered about a dozen tups...valuable breeders.
I do recall the Danes needed a bit more killing than expected.
The smell...the sounds....
 
There's always a risk if you take a dog that has been bred for a purpose and you place it in an environment where it lacks that purpose, and/or or is not trained in an appropriate manner.

When I was living in London, a friend wanted to have a dog and said she wanted a collie. She lived in a pokey wee flat and worked in an office. I advised her very strongly to in no way entertain the idea - collies are known to self-harm out of stress/frustration.

Another friend has a Belgian Malinois - and it's an awesome dog, but great care has been taken to train it correctly and appropriately, including bite training - so it knows when biting is an appropriate response. The dog is a big softy with me and just wants to be challenged/worked, or to have attention. But I would not cross it - the crossover from big souk on your feet to immediate, teeth-baring, stand-to alertness is something to behold.
At the vets today - I watched a woman struggling with a young Malinois - No Authourity of it - It was friendly just young and boisterous - but it took her where it wanted to go - she was less in control and more a heavy weight to slow it down
 

DSJ

LE
At the vets today - I watched a woman struggling with a young Malinois - No Authourity of it - It was friendly just young and boisterous - but it took her where it wanted to go - she was less in control and more a heavy weight to slow it down

Problematic if the dog appoints itself the Alpha of its pack!
 

scoldog

On ROPS
On ROPs
At the vets today - I watched a woman struggling with a young Malinois - No Authourity of it - It was friendly just young and boisterous - but it took her where it wanted to go - she was less in control and more a heavy weight to slow it down
 

Chef

LE
Problematic if the dog appoints itself the Alpha of its pack!
My grandmother had a Labrador and there was no question as to who the leader was. Said dog had a lovely life but was never allowed up stairs and knew what was and wasn't permitted.

Never a problem with him.
 
At the vets today - I watched a woman struggling with a young Malinois - No Authourity of it - It was friendly just young and boisterous - but it took her where it wanted to go - she was less in control and more a heavy weight to slow it down
Had a similar experience in PC World a few years back.

A slightly overdone woman in high heels, who made Dolly Parton look drab in comparison had a St. Bernard that was exploring the shop at its leisure with this Barbie Doll tottering along in its wake whose only purpose was to apologise for her dog being a pest. She served no other purpose.

I didn't mind the dog, he(?) was friendly but curious and the owner had zero control of him. I stopped and petted him for a bit to give her a break.
Other customers weren't so understanding, which was fair enough.
 
An interesting article, with a number of good sources included which seem to support some of the conclusions commentators have made on here.

I am on the fence - I have dog-sat a staffy. It’s owner was a well educated, stable and intelligent fellow squaddie (yeah, there are a couple of us out there). As a result the dog was well trained, socialised and a genuine pleasure to be around.

But I wouldn’t go near one owned by a chav.

I have recently lost my heart to the dog of a friend of mine - an utter angel who is a collie/whippet mix. She just wanted to play fetch until she fell asleep on her feet, ball in mouth - like a child her toy was removed from her grasp, I carried her to bed and tucked her up. I literally cannot read ‘a heart to tear’ by Kipling.

Edit to add pic of an angel

5436E8E4-7BEF-4FF2-B6AC-E299C6571330.jpeg
 
An interesting article, with a number of good sources included which seem to support some of the conclusions commentators have made on here.

I am on the fence - I have dog-sat a staffy. It’s owner was a well educated, stable and intelligent fellow squaddie (yeah, there are a couple of us out there). As a result the dog was well trained, socialised and a genuine pleasure to be around.

But I wouldn’t go near one owned by a chav.

I have recently lost my heart to the dog of a friend of mine - an utter angel who is a collie/whippet mix. She just wanted to play fetch until she fell asleep on her feet, ball in mouth - like a child her toy was removed from her grasp, I carried her to bed and tucked her up. I literally cannot read ‘a heart to tear’ by Kipling.

Edit to add pic of an angel

View attachment 676086
Gay.
 

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