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They must have put on quite a spurt considering that AAPC and Para Regt recruit course P Coy are not run at the same time.
Well test weeks were run at the same time in 1983. The milling, Stretcher race and log race was run against Para Reg recruits, and they would have had to put on quite a spurt to catch up, despite their DS beasting them something rotten.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
Well test weeks were run at the same time in 1983. The milling, Stretcher race and log race was run against Para Reg recruits, and they would have had to put on quite a spurt to catch up, despite their DS beasting them something rotten.
Yes, of course. If you say so.
 

Chef

LE
As someone who gets dizzy standing on a chair I pass this observation on from a mate, ex-29 (Falklands period) who later joined 131 Sqn RE.

At the parachute school there was a certain amount of banter as to who's course was the hardest:

The Commando training was the hardest to pass: There were lots of Red Berets, quite a few sandy ones but hardly any green ones.

QED:cool:
 
As someone who gets dizzy standing on a chair I pass this observation on from a mate, ex-29 (Falklands period) who later joined 131 Sqn RE.

At the parachute school there was a certain amount of banter as to who's course was the hardest:

The Commando training was the hardest to pass: There were lots of Red Berets, quite a few sandy ones but hardly any green ones.

QED:cool:
Thats because Royal Marines are not generaly parachute trained except for recce, M/L, and SBS. Hence very few green ones at PTS.
 
I think the international trend is to move more towards the 75th Ranger Regiment mode. Hence the SFSG, Australian 2 Commando Regiment. The Canadian Special Operations Regiment.

The Australians took 3 RAR off its Parachute status as it reckoned that it would be unlikely there would be more than Company sized static line jumps, which could be handled by 2 Cdo Regt.

How many Airborne operations have been larger than a battalion since WW2? Korea in 1950 by the US Airborne, and Dien Bien Phu by the French - and look how that went.

The French have been doing quite a lot of parachuting insertions of various sizes as of late in Mali I think I read on another thread.

A tool to have in a box that can’t be replaced quickly or easily. However anyone can be trained to disembark a boat as proven by about every unit on D-Day.

It is however a mute argument as Para Reg/Airborne forces/Commando trained soldiers/Royal Marines are better kept than cut as amongst other things they are a great recruiting tool and also tend to get used more often in smaller operations.
 

Chef

LE
@The_Duke and @par avion I'd never have thought of that, honest, but it's a good windup.

My only claim to airborne fame is I did do the shuffle bars at Browning for a pre RCB (Where I discovered a strong desire to keep near the ground) I was and still am proud to have done that much.

As for the jumping from one platform to another? You can f**k right off!

The PTI who ran through the confidence course impressed the hell out of me.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
When there were plenty of places available, it was possible for RM to just put a bid in and maybe get a spot. As belts, and course availability, tightened then they had to justify a place. For GD Marines, pretty much impossible to achieve now.

The illusion jump never bothered me, even having to follow a few refusals after a nasty open fracture.
 
When there were plenty of places available, it was possible for RM to just put a bid in and maybe get a spot. As belts, and course availability, tightened then they had to justify a place. For GD Marines, pretty much impossible to achieve now.

The illusion jump never bothered me, even having to follow a few refusals after a nasty open fracture.
That didn't bother me either after they told us it was an illusion and for once they wern't lying. And me being a big scaredy cat as well. Now the jump over the six foot gap - that did scar the pants off me. Looking at YouTube videos they seem to have safety nets everywhere now. I have aften wondered if anyone fell off, although I never heard any stories.
 
The only green lids I remember seeing with anything approaching regularity on the BPCs were gunners, sappers and the odd matelot. No doubt SBS as well, but at the time they were indistinguishable from normal royals.
 
The only green lids I remember seeing with anything approaching regularity on the BPCs were gunners, sappers and the odd matelot. No doubt SBS as well, but at the time they were indistinguishable from normal royals.
They would be from Recce Troop 59 Cdo RE and 148 Bty RA.
 
The only green lids I remember seeing with anything approaching regularity on the BPCs were gunners, sappers and the odd matelot. No doubt SBS as well, but at the time they were indistinguishable from normal royals.

Apologies for slight thread drift, but I find it interesting that I've known many SBS bods over the years and to a man have always introduced themselves as Royal, whereas the similar number of Hereford lads have seldom, if ever, introduced themselves by their parent Regt or Corps.
 
Apologies for slight thread drift, but I find it interesting that I've known many SBS bods over the years and to a man have always introduced themselves as Royal, whereas the similar number of Hereford lads have seldom, if ever, introduced themselves by their parent Regt or Corps.
Was this down in the Dog and Duck?
 

Oyibo

LE
Just to get back to the OP's original post - No problems with TA/Reserves joining regular Bns in my time. Yes, there will be the usual STAB ribbing, but no worse than when one comes from Depot as a regular crow.

Bottom line is, if you're a good soldier and good bloke, no problem. It's a while since I was in but I doubt it has changed much.
 
Fewer parachute course places awarded to people whose primary role is to arrive by boat? Who’d have thought it, eh?

Doing a refresher in 98 and was surprised to find a hoofing load of booties on course, some who I knew well. Anyway, I remember a SNCO making a casual comment that 3Cdo Bde had as many para qual'd blokes as Airborne - undoubtedly not necessarily in role or receipt of Para pay but it occurred it could be possible for a Corps to have a lot compared to a Regt*

*Numbers may vary and probably didn't consider 4, 10 and 15 Para as then was.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
There are lots of throw away stats out there, not all of which bear scrutiny. If we apply some logic - 3 regular battalions, say 500 each, somewhere between 90% and 100% para trained because it is a prerequisite of the cap badge. Between 1350 and 1500, excluding Reserve and other 16x units. Add in the AR, 16X and people at E and the numbers go up considerably.

Are more than 1/3 of 3CDOX Para trained? If we compare all para trained PIDs in 16x as “the Airborne” they would have to get a higher amount again. In 1998 there were three nearly fully manned TA Bns to account for, if they were throwing RMR into the mix.

Not impossible but far from probable. Especially give the pressure on para training slots over the last 20 years. “Legacy quals” would be senior officer/NCO territory.
 
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Apologies for slight thread drift, but I find it interesting that I've known many SBS bods over the years and to a man have always introduced themselves as Royal, whereas the similar number of Hereford lads have seldom, if ever, introduced themselves by their parent Regt or Corps.

Probably because the canoe club was an adjunct to the corps rather than a unit with a distinct regimental identity - plus the TA lads not having parent units. The creation of UKSF changed that.
 
They protest too much.....
The Ladybird book of be glad you joined the RPC?
 

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