Arctic ARW units and RAF in rescue mission in Glen of imaal.

Discussion in 'Ireland (ie. Irish Defence Force)' started by mordread, Feb 10, 2009.

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  1. Elite Irish troops were today airlifted onto Leinster’s highest mountain to help rescue teams find two climbers stranded overnight.

    Four helicopters and dozens of personnel drawn from Ireland, the North and Wales are involved in the high-level operation on Lugnacoille in Co Wicklow.
    The two Irish climbers, who are aged in their 30s, became disorientated in freezing fog at 4pm yesterday.
    They were forced to spend the night on the mountain but have remained in mobile phone contact with rescue teams.
    “There is zero visibility on the mountain at the moment. The two men can hear the helicopters but cannot see them,” said an Irish Coast Guard spokeswoman.
    “It is believed the men may be close to the summit.”
    Some 50 members of the Army Ranger Wing (ARW) with Arctic survival skills were dropped into the area by Air Corps helicopters today after they were diverted from nearby drills in the Glen of Imaal military zone.
    Teams from Co Wicklow, Co Kerry and Newcastle, Co Down are also assisting the search, led by Glen of Imaal Mountain Rescue.
    A RAF Sea King helicopter flew in a rescue team from Wales while an Irish Coastguard helicopter from Waterford also transported a civilian rescue unit across the Irish Sea from nearby Ogwen Valley.
    Lugnacoille is about 925m (3,035ft) high and its base is located close to Glenmalure, about 105km (65 miles) south of Dublin.
    Met Éireann forecast sleet and snow across high ground in the central Wicklow area today.
    The RAF admitted it was unusual for its personnel to get involved in an Irish mountain rescue operation.
    “Our colleagues in Ireland requested our assistance and we are happy to help,” said a spokesman for the RAF Rescue Centre at Kinloss in Scotland.
    “It is very unusual for UK assets to deploy in this way, especially a civilian team, but when lives are at risk everyone with the expertise who can help wants to help.”
    He added: “We are united in giving this search our very best shot. Conditions are improving and we hope and pray for a good outcome.”
    The Defence Forces confirmed two Air Corps AW 139 helicopters are also assisting the Glen of Imaal Mountain Rescue Team and Irish Coast Guard in the ongoing search.
    “The Army Rangers were diverted to the Glen of Imaal from a training exercise to carry out searches in the general area around Lugnaquilla Mountain (925 metres/3,034 feet) and Slievemaan (759 metres/2,490 feet),” said a spokesman.
    “They have been dropped by helicopter to search areas this morning. This unit has personnel qualified in Arctic survival skills.
    “Other local military staff from Coolmooney Camp in the Glen of Imaal were assisting and co-ordinating with Glen of Imaal Mountain Rescue throughout last night.”
    The alarm was raised at about 9.30pm last night by Army personnel in the Glen of Imaal.
    The Coast Guard helicopter was scrambled but was forced back from the mountain by poor visibility.
    “The situation is ongoing and developing,” added a Department of Transport spokeswoman today.

    The story continues, again from www.breakingnews.ie

    well done to all teams and assets involved.

    Two climbers found:

    Two climbers stranded for nearly 24 hours in freezing conditions on Leinster’s highest mountain were found safe and are being airlifted to hospital this afternoon.

    The Irish pair were located close to the summit of Lugnaquilla in Co Wicklow after a massive ground and air operation involving Irish and British rescue teams backed by the Defence Forces.

    In one of the biggest rescues ever mounted in the area, up to 50 members of the elite Army Ranger Wing were assisted by helicopters scrambled by the Irish Coast Guard, the Air Corps and the RAF.

    “The two men were located after 12.30pm in an area close to the summit known as the South Prison,” said a spokesman for the Defence Forces’ Operations Cell in the Curragh.

    “An Air Corps helicopter immediately dropped medics and equipment to the scene.

    “Members of the Army Rangers Wing and civilian mountain rescue personnel are currently assisting the men.

    “They will be moved to lower ground and Air Corps helicopters are on standby to airlift them to hospital.”

    The two climbers, who are aged in their 30s, became disorientated in freezing fog at 4pm yesterday.

    They were forced to spend the night on the mountain but have remained in mobile phone contact with rescue teams.

    Army Rangers with Arctic survival skills were dropped into the area from helicopters after being diverted from nearby drills in the Glen of Imaal military zone.

    Teams from Co Wicklow, Co Kerry and Newcastle, Co Down also assisted the search, led by the Glen of Imaal Mountain Rescue Team.

    A RAF Sea King helicopter also flew in a specialist military rescue team from RAF Valley in Wales while an Irish Coast Guard helicopter from Waterford also transported a civilian rescue unit across the Irish Sea from the Ogwen Valley.

    Lugnaquilla is about 925m (3,035ft) high and its base is located close to Glenmalure, about 105km (65 miles) south of Dublin.

    The RAF admitted it was unusual for its personnel to get involved in an Irish mountain rescue operation.

    “It is very unusual for UK assets to deploy in this way, especially a civilian team, but when lives are at risk everyone with the expertise who can help wants to help,” said a spokesman for the RAF Rescue Centre at Kinloss in Scotland.

    The RAF team was specifically trained and equipped for high Alpine rescue conditions.
    The Army Rangers unit has personnel qualified in Arctic survival skills. Other local Defence Forces staff from Coolmooney Camp in the Glen of Imaal assisted rescue efforts overnight.

    The alarm was raised at about 9.30pm last night by Army personnel in the Glen of Imaal.

    The Coast Guard helicopter was then scrambled but was forced back from the mountain by poor visibility.

    Just whipped this off of http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2055484936 Seems the two guys made it thanks to an awful lot of hard work and cooperation between both Irish and British forces, and not forgetting the Mountain Rescue. Good stuff, job done. :boogie:
     
  2. I hope those two mongs are presented with the bill for all this! There's no excuse if they were truly 'climbers' as opposed to a pair of inbreds they would have a) checked the weather b) brought a GPS or a map and compass and had the ability to get themselves down. e.g. It says nothing about them being injured.
     
  3. I don't believe they were injured, the last word I have is that they were told to go to ground and wait out by Mountain Rescue while the actual loc/rescue was put into play. All things considered a very rapid deployment by both.

    As to the expense..well thats another argument isn't it. have to say I was mighty impressed by the interaction of IDF/RAF. Bloody good show! Major p!ssup, I mean donation to NAAFI( what is the Irish equivalent? mess) in the form of copious amount of high class beer, and lets not forget the Mountain Rescue guys, I have a relation with them who does their comms.
     
  4. Concur with the thumbs up on co-operation. Might I suggest they follow this lads example in settling their debt link
     
  5. Its great to see that there is an not only international consenus

    but also there is a consensus from Irish army/ British Army/ Irish Aer Corps/ RAF


    I saw the RAF heli fly over my house, I hope the crew did an overnight in Baldonnel and sampled

    the delights of the mess and the locals
     
  6. Both guys being interviewed by Gerry Ryan on 2fm as we speak.
     
  7. RAF Valley and the Irish Air Corps have a long if informal working relationship.
     
  8. Is he wearing uniform for that?

    Other than that, what a good lad. I am sure he we will be an asset to the Marines when he joins them.
     
  9. The Mountain Rescue Spokesperson said the two men weren't being irresponsible.

    Which was a hot topic for debate amongst mountaineers and climbers here.