Archilles Tendonitus

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by crabby, Mar 15, 2006.

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  1. When I was just a wee one I suffered quite badly with achilles tendonitus. I had it from 10-14, the thought was that basically at the age of 12 I had size 13 feet and that combined with being active caused them to be unhappy with me. They were classed as growing pains and I did eventually grow out of them and into some knee problems.
    However, ever since I've had the occasional problem. Early mornings, especially if it's a bit cold if I walk, stop and try to start again my ankles have pretty much frozen solid and walking can be agony. On long hikes (can't call them tabs anymore, used to be stab but no more) they do like to remind me they're there, although lowas have really really helped.
    I've got quite slim, girly ankles (in contrast to huge, hairy feet) and I was wondering if anyone had tips for keeping them lose and getting less pain?


    P.S If anyone has any tips for shoulder/back/neck pain, especially ways to sit and lie without suffering pain could you let me know as well? I kinda made a mess of myself a while ago :p
     
  2. My son had an identical problem at age 12/13. We ended up at a Sports Injury Clinic where a very switched-on consultant told us that there was a lot of controversy about whether growing pains exist or not. He believed they did and that a lot of the problem with very active youngsters was caused by their bones and muscles (and therefore ligaments) not growing at the same pace... lots of pain is the result. It made perfect sense.

    After a lot of physio my lad's achilles improved no end but he still needed to do masses more stretching than anyone else before sports.
     
  3. Yeah I was pretty sure it was growing pains but I'm now 21 and don't especially like suffering probably once a fortnight with a bit of ankle seizing. My knee problems (14-19) were caused again by growing pains, my bones grew too quickly for my muscles and so my muscles couldn't cope and my kneecap went wandering around most of my leg whenever it felt like a jolly.
    I'm currently seeing a physio for back, reckon I should mention ankles?
    Yes I am a total BIFF and I admit it, it's been one problem after another and it's quite disheartening, especially as my shoulder/back injury has screwed my chances of going regular
     
  4. I suffer from Achilles Tendonitus in my left foot. I had to get an appointment to see an Orthopaedic Surgeon (very easy because I work in Orthopaedic Theatres).

    He sent me for Physiotherapy and I have to wear a sock like device with a pad each side of my Achilles Tendon, this will try and relieve the pain (not so far, sometimes the pain is worse.)

    He has warned me if the Tendon sheath is still swollen within a year he may have to operate to debulk it.

    So there you are Go and see your GP and ask for an Orthopaedic referall.

    Hope that helps.
     
  5. I had achilles tendonitis on and off for a few years.

    My solution was to go to my local running shop and get a new pair of trainers. Apparently mine were too firm - it worked too. Supposedly this is a known common problem.

    Also suggest that you mention your ankle problem to your physio. It certainly can't do any harm and you may get some free advice at the same time.
     
  6. I have achilles tendonitis. It really sucks. Thought it was due to stepping up the running a bit too qucikly and a being a bit lazy on my stretching. Never had a problem before. Anti inflam meds and physio didn't nothing. Went to a podiatrist and turned out I had semi rigid 1st meta tarsal segment in my left foot that was leading to achilles overload when doing high impact work. I've had some bespoke orthotics made up and they seem to help, but 4 weeks later tendon is still a bit tight. Obviously loads of stretching is going to help, but you may find the root of the prob goes beyond that. I'll be honest its been a right spanner in the works, bu it is a fairly common condition and is controllable. Google achilles tendonitis and the truth will set you free!
     
  7. Crabby, come on admit it your a Hobbitt ( Hairy Size 13 feet the give away )

    I was a stab some years ago and had to give it up due to achilles tendonitis. Did some physio which soreted out one side quite well. The other leg had to see a surgeon who said he could open it up but there was a 50/50 chance it would stay the same and so he wouldn't risk it. He said only option was to stop running about espcially up hills, so that put paid to my Ta days ( due to unit I was in )
     
  8. Crikey! It's like Achillies Tendonitis Anonymous here!

    I too had some gyp from achillies tendonitis, I also suffered a rupture of the musculotendonous junction between the achillies and calf muscle. The best advice is to a) see a physio b) slowly incriment any training you do c) keep an eye on it and don't push it too hard.

    It sounds like the dynamics of your legs are a bit skewed. Unfortunately this happens to some people. When you grow, your bones grow under the strain of the muscle groups surrounding them. If the alignment is disturbed through excessive sport or just bad luck then you can enter a cycle of malalignment/compensation which affects all of the joints/muscles/tendons in the leg. It looks like you're doing all you can be seeing a physio and orthopod. Good luck.
     
  9. Best advice is to get to a Physio who will
    1. Take your history 2. Do a thorough examination of the tendon/calf (both sides) 3. Look at your biomechanics (how you walk) 4. Check your footwear 5. Enquire about your training regime and lots more besides..
    Is your tendon acutely inflamed? Is it hot, swollen, red as well as painful? Does it 'creak' (put a finger either side of the tendon, move your foot up and down...what do feel?) If 'yes'....RICE it
    The jury is out on the issue of 'growing pains'; it is a useful cop out if one cannot come up with a sensible diagnosis.
    Physio will be directed at reducing the inflammation and a good stretching routine which should include eccentric work. I will not go into details but your Physio should. A very useful Physio tool is SSTM (Specific Soft Tissue Mobilisations).
    Be patient! TA problems can be something of a nightmare but there are plenty of ways of managing the problem