Archaeology and Forgery

Word.

The medal collecting world is currently shaking off the recent conviction of 2 Black Country-based dealers who were churning out MCs, DFCs, AFCs etc at a regular and most alarming rate.

And damned good they were as well. Somehow, they managed to persuade a tool die manufacturer to cut some very good MC and DFC dies (the AFC die was a lesser quality). The story used was that they worked for a distant Regimental museum and needed to replace the current (genuine) display with copies for insurance purposes.

That tied in with obtaining the necessary presses from another company and Bingo! lets make some money, boys.

The trial suggested that they turned at least £70+k for their efforts - the anorak world suggests that figure probably needs to be doubled.

. . . as to collecting German WWII-era badges and decorations?

Don't. The bulk of them on the market are fake.
I know a very nice couple, well apart from their madness in following the sealed knot , to the bloody letter. Even their dog has a sealed knot name and has to wear historically correct stuff.

Both are exceptional artists, he is the metal smith , she the potter. Their stuff is good enough to be used in the Tower of London and other palaces to replace broken pottery, tiles and metal work.

He was approached by a wealthy American to , “Can you make some Coins from the 1600’s , just for my private collection you understand” .

Yes of course, I will also be putting in a sliver of modern metal to prevent them from being sold on.


WTF are you mad.

Well he is but not a mug.
 
I hope he sold it?

. . . having said that, he screwed up a decent pre-War Service Dress tunic that would have probably fetched £70 :rolleyes:
Modern reproduction apparently, the stitching gave the game away. Its very pre-war. According my my friend, its actually a WWI tunic.
Note: I'm not a uniform guy, so I couldn't tell you.
 
I know a very nice couple, well apart from their madness in following the sealed knot , to the bloody letter. Even their dog has a sealed knot name and has to wear historically correct stuff.

Both are exceptional artists, he is the metal smith , she the potter. Their stuff is good enough to be used in the Tower of London and other palaces to replace broken pottery, tiles and metal work.

He was approached by a wealthy American to , “Can you make some Coins from the 1600’s , just for my private collection you understand” .

Yes of course, I will also be putting in a sliver of modern metal to prevent them from being sold on.


WTF are you mad.

Well he is but not a mug.
For the NFPS (Norse film and pageant society) we had a chap who would strike "authentic" coins but with the two sides from different coins so they could be used by us for props but not sold as proper coins.
 
I was pointed in the direction of this news story by a friend, and while not about military things, it is an interesting historical news piece:


Essentially an archeologist decided to make himself famous by creatively editing a few finds. But he'd made a few mistakes (amoungst them not watching Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade).
The most surprising thing about it is how badly done the fakes were.
 
Rumour has it that Carter kept Tutankhamun's tomb in his back pocket for a couple of years while he took Carnarvon's gelt.
I strongly doubt that (from a position of some distant lineage and also a real familiarity with this period and site). The Davis assertion that the site was exhausted as well as the fact that by the time Carter was digging for Carnarvon meant there were very few New Kingdom tombs left to find, as well as the fact that Carter had been in and out of borderline poverty for much of his time in Egypt suggests to me that he'd not have held back.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
I strongly doubt that (from a position of some distant lineage and also a real familiarity with this period and site). The Davis assertion that the site was exhausted as well as the fact that by the time Carter was digging for Carnarvon meant there were very few New Kingdom tombs left to find, as well as the fact that Carter had been in and out of borderline poverty for much of his time in Egypt suggests to me that he'd not have held back.
My library is currently in storage so I can't give you chapter and verse but, for much the same reasons you cite, Carter may well have been up to no good.

 
My library is currently in storage so I can't give you chapter and verse but, for much the same reasons you cite, Carter may well have been up to no good.

Absolutely - there's little doubt that quite a few objects were moved on away from the eye of the antiquities service and the finds catalogue! An ancient aunt of mine had a few items before she developed a sudden superstition about them and gave them away - some faience and ushabtis (not Tut, I don't think). However, I'm just not sure that Carter would have delayed things. After all, the 'underground' antiquities market was pretty savvy - the Amarna Cache was twigged quite quickly because of the number of royal things the Abd-Er Rassuls were salting into the well-monied tourist buyers.
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Absolutely - there's little doubt that quite a few objects were moved on away from the eye of the antiquities service and the finds catalogue! An ancient aunt of mine had a few items before she developed a sudden superstition about them and gave them away - some faience and ushabtis (not Tut, I don't think). However, I'm just not sure that Carter would have delayed things. After all, the 'underground' antiquities market was pretty savvy - the Amarna Cache was twigged quite quickly because of the number of royal things the Abd-Er Rassuls were salting into the well-monied tourist buyers.
The book, which I can't access, suggests that Carter spun things out for a couple of seasons whilst flogging off bits from Tut's tomb to keep himself in readies.
 
Word.

The medal collecting world is currently shaking off the recent conviction of 2 Black Country-based dealers who were churning out MCs, DFCs, AFCs etc at a regular and most alarming rate.

And damned good they were as well. Somehow, they managed to persuade a tool die manufacturer to cut some very good MC and DFC dies (the AFC die was a lesser quality). The story used was that they worked for a distant Regimental museum and needed to replace the current (genuine) display with copies for insurance purposes.

That tied in with obtaining the necessary presses from another company and Bingo! lets make some money, boys.

The trial suggested that they turned at least £70+k for their efforts - the anorak world suggests that figure probably needs to be doubled.

. . . as to collecting German WWII-era badges and decorations?

Don't. The bulk of them on the market are fake.
To be honest you don't even need to do that. I'm sure 10 minutes googling or searching on Alibaba will give you a company you can send something to in China and they will copy it exactly . I'm sure that's what happened with the tank masks.

They are really not going to give to hoots about it.
 

Awol

LE
Phil Harding of Time Team fame can/could do a very creditable Neolithic arrowhead.
Digging a shell scrape in BATUS I came across a stone arrowhead. For a minute I was quite excited having found something Neolithic, until it dawned on me that the local tribes had probably been making them until about a hundred years ago.
 
Digging a shell scrape in BATUS I came across a stone arrowhead. For a minute I was quite excited having found something Neolithic, until it dawned on me that the local tribes had probably been making them until about a hundred years ago.
Actually, owning one of the last to be made by someone who wasn't a hobbiest or academic would be pretty cool.
 
Digging a shell scrape in BATUS I came across a stone arrowhead. For a minute I was quite excited having found something Neolithic, until it dawned on me that the local tribes had probably been making them until about a hundred years ago.
Some natives* were making them for tourists when I was in America. I expect it's still going on now.



*Probably outsourced to Mexicans or bought in from China by now
 
I've got a genuine Roman helmet that still has the legionnaires name embossed on it.

Calorus Propanius
Obviously a fake, everyone knows he was Calorus Butanus.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
Phil Harding of Time Team fame can/could do a very creditable Neolithic arrowhead.
I can do you a pretty good henge if you want one.

dating isn't a problem because the current one has been up a lot longer than the 4000 years they desperately cling to.
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer
I liked it as a kid in tunisia where you could buy two types of souvenir - the new looking one right next to the aged one.

at least they were honest about it. unlike the egyptians who claim everything is 10,000 years old.
 
Apparently during the Roman era dealers made loads of fake Greek artworks to sell to wealthy nouveau riche Roman collectors who wanted to show off how cultured they were. A fair number of "Greek" artworks in museums are actually 2,000 year old fakes.

During the Victorian era, art dealers made loads of fake suits of armour and other medieval artefacts to sell to wealthy nouveau riche collectors who wanted them for their country houses in order to show how posh their family supposedly was. Modern museums are full of these as well. Very often parts of the armour are genuine, but the full suit as displayed may consist of a hodge podge of various pieces that don't go with one another, plus a few Victorian made replica bits to fill in for parts the dealer didn't have.

Some Victorian dealers made up entire categories of alleged "medieval artefacts" to sell to collectors. Things which were considered to be a bit naughty to Victorian moralists were good sellers. A good example are "chastity belts", all of which are today considered to be Victorian fakes, and for which there is no evidence of such a thing having ever actually existed in medieval times.

All of these things pose a problem for museums. Things once considered to be "genuine" because they had been in a museam collection for a long time are now being recognised as fakes. This presents a problem for museums, when important parts of their collection are suddenly a lot less valuable than they were once thought to be.
 
I used to work as a photographers assistant, and we did a lot of work for Country life magazine.
So lots of castles and old houses.
It took me a while but eventually I caught on that nearly every single one had supposedly medieval torture devices that were probably knocked up by the local blacksmith a hundred or so years ago.
The most popular one was the one that would be strapped over the mouth of the wife and cut her tounge if she had the audacity to try and speak.

Come to think of it there could be a market for a modern day version.
 

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