Archaeology and Forgery

I was pointed in the direction of this news story by a friend, and while not about military things, it is an interesting historical news piece:


Essentially an archeologist decided to make himself famous by creatively editing a few finds. But he'd made a few mistakes (amoungst them not watching Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade).
 

Kirkz

LE
I was pointed in the direction of this news story by a friend, and while not about military things, it is an interesting historical news piece:


Essentially an archeologist decided to make himself famous by creatively editing a few finds. But he'd made a few mistakes (amoungst them not watching Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade).
He's not the first and he won't be the last.
Archeology is littered with people who've faked finds some of which have not yet been discovered.
 

Kirkz

LE
I see from reading the article that they used the age old excuse of " it was only a joke".
Well that's alright then isn't it. :roll:
 

Chef

LE
I liked this bit:

'Not to mention, the crucifixion scene read ‘RIP’, which contradicts Christian belief in the divinity of Jesus.'

I'm surprised that

a) There was nothing dated 100BC

b) It took a panel of 'experts' two years to work out they were fakes.

Does explain the level of Spanish painting restorations;

Original painting and two travesties
 
He's not the first and he won't be the last.
Archeology is littered with people who've faked finds some of which have not yet been discovered.

There was that episode of Time Team where "someone" (not the time team crew) bunged a few extra items on the site, but forgot that barbed wire doesn't pre-date iron age swords
 
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You also have the opposite. This utterly minging helmet was assumed to be a fake since it was found in the 1950's. A recent scientific examination has confirmed it is actually 1,000 years old.

1594651287572.png
 
Here's one - think about how many tanks were used in ww1 ...and then think about how many crew there were ... then think about those masks some of them may or may not have worn .
You know , the goggles with slits in with the chain mail hanging underneath.

At any one point before this covid started and perhaps now , for years there have always been 2 or 3 for sale at any one point , usually for £500 or so . And they are selling. The person also seemed to have an abundance if rare iron crosses as well.

I did find the dealers name once and it bought up the fact that he was basically well known in militaria circles for being a fraud so he was just selling to the gulibble public ( no doubt American collectors ) on ebay.
 
Here's one - think about how many tanks were used in ww1 ...and then think about how many crew there were ... then think about those masks some of them may or may not have worn .
You know , the goggles with slits in with the chain mail hanging underneath.

At any one point before this covid started and perhaps now , for years there have always been 2 or 3 for sale at any one point , usually for £500 or so . And they are selling. The person also seemed to have an abundance if rare iron crosses as well.

I did find the dealers name once and it bought up the fact that he was basically well known in militaria circles for being a fraud so he was just selling to the gulibble public ( no doubt American collectors ) on ebay.
Word.

The medal collecting world is currently shaking off the recent conviction of 2 Black Country-based dealers who were churning out MCs, DFCs, AFCs etc at a regular and most alarming rate.

And damned good they were as well. Somehow, they managed to persuade a tool die manufacturer to cut some very good MC and DFC dies (the AFC die was a lesser quality). The story used was that they worked for a distant Regimental museum and needed to replace the current (genuine) display with copies for insurance purposes.

That tied in with obtaining the necessary presses from another company and Bingo! lets make some money, boys.

The trial suggested that they turned at least £70+k for their efforts - the anorak world suggests that figure probably needs to be doubled.

. . . as to collecting German WWII-era badges and decorations?

Don't. The bulk of them on the market are fake.
 
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FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
He's not the first and he won't be the last.
Archeology is littered with people who've faked finds some of which have not yet been discovered.
Rumour has it that Carter kept Tutankhamun's tomb in his back pocket for a couple of years while he took Carnarvon's gelt.
 

Awol

LE
I've got a genuine Roman helmet that still has the legionnaires name embossed on it.

Calorus Propanius
My cousin enjoys rooting around fields looking for Roman coins etc.

She was delighted to find a piece of terracotta marked with the legionnaire’s name.

Marley.
 
. . . as to collecting German WWII-era badges and decorations?

Don't. The bulk of them on the market are fake.
I know, I just don't understand the fascination with NAZI memorabilia... Of course there's a moral question there. Is it morally fine to rip off NAZI fantasising bellends?

One of my mates, (in fact the one who sent me the link in the original post) also has previously posted this item:


Apparently it was listed as £80.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Zero Alpha loves to tell of when she lived at Alconbury and went to school in Sawtry (I do believe this is where/when Blue Peter went to watch a mad headmaster build an igloo every winter).

It's a good area for Roman archaeology. They had a display of Roman artefacts in the corridor.

Stan, her father, worked for a plastics company in Huntingdon. Aside from Stan personally being with Fairey Delta 2 and much epoxy resin ensuring it did its thing when it goes and sets a new World Airspeed Record by a country mile, Harcostar designed and manufactured plastic shrouds for traffic lights, water tanks for Inter City 125s, carboys, fuel tanks, etc. Anything plastic.

And gnomes. Garden gnomes. Plastic garden gnomes. She "borrowed" one of Stan's gnomes from the car and placed it in the display with a card, "Genuine Roman Plastic Gnome circa 1970".

It took the grown-ups three weeks to notice it. It was removed (presumably to the Staff Room). She still complains that they stole her gnome.

Somewhat off-topic, C Sqn 15/19H had their own gnome, lived (like the rest of them) in their Squadron bar. When I left he had been promoted to Corporal. At a reunion some years ago, I asked after Cpl Gnome. Nobody was entirely sure, but consensus was he now lived in the Light Dragoons' Sergeants' Mess
 

Chef

LE
I know, I just don't understand the fascination with NAZI memorabilia... Of course there's a moral question there. Is it morally fine to rip off NAZI fantasising bellends?

One of my mates, (in fact the one who sent me the link in the original post) also has previously posted this item:


Apparently it was listed as £80.
John O'Farrell wrote a couple of mock history books along the lines of '1066 and all that'.

In the second volume 'An utterly exasperated history of modern Britain.'* He starts in 1945 and says that after the evil of the Nazis had been defeated artefacts and uniforms from the 3rd Reich, especially SS would be despised and people would pay top dollar for souvenirs of the liberating allies...Oh wait.

*For a left leaning writer both the books are good reads and pretty even handed.
 
I know, I just don't understand the fascination with NAZI memorabilia... Of course there's a moral question there. Is it morally fine to rip off NAZI fantasising bellends?

One of my mates, (in fact the one who sent me the link in the original post) also has previously posted this item:


Apparently it was listed as £80.
I hope he sold it?

. . . having said that, he screwed up a decent pre-War Service Dress tunic that would have probably fetched £70 :rolleyes:
 

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