Arafat

#2
With a bit of luck both sides will take his passing as an opportunity to strike a better accord. Having said that either (or both together) are entirely capable of fukcing it up yet again.

Arafat was too old, out of touch and slow to react in the last 10 or more years and became a barrier to progress.
 
#3
It really looks like he may peg it. Can’t say I’ll be sorry, and let’s face it the world would be a better place without him.

As birdie says it will give both sides an opportunity to try again, but they will probably fcuk it up. :roll:
 
#4
I'm not aware of anyone really in a position to assume his role. My concern is that a power vacuum will encourage extremists to flex their muscle.

However, Yasser blew chunks when he fouled up the Israeli offer a few years ago that gave him the vast majority of what he and the Palestinians were after. Had he not been so stubborn he would be ending his days in the Palestinian state.
 
#5
I agree there is no obvious successor; however a power vacuum is not such a bad thing. Think how many of the nutters are going to try knocking each other off. Might clean out the tired old feckers and get some new blood with some fresh ideas in charge.

He well and truly blew it by refusing the offer of the Israelis a few years ago. It makes you think these people really don’t want this shite to end

Just noticed on Reuters that the “ex guerrilla” is slipping in and out of consciousness. Shame the twat is not screaming in pain like some of the innocents whose deaths he was responsible for.

Good riddance to him. He’s in for a fecking huge shock though when he meets beelzibub and not Allah in a short while. :?
 
E

error_unknown

Guest
#6
Much as I won't mourn his passing, lets hope he's not replaced by an hard core fanatic who stirs it all up again.
 
#7
Das Stab said:
Much as I won't mourn his passing, lets hope he's not replaced by an hard core fanatic who stirs it all up again.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/1362216.stm
The contenders

Possible contenders fall into two main categories. There are the older men who have worked with Mr Arafat for a long time and younger figures who have come to the fore more recently.


Ahmed Qurei is a long-time colleague of Arafat

Those in the first category worked with the PLO - the umbrella body of the Palestinian movement - during its long years in exile in Jordan, Lebanon and Tunisia.

They are people Mr Arafat trusts, but Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza tend to regard them as outsiders. They are sometimes dubbed the "Tunisians" and some of them are tainted by accusations of corruption.

In this category are:

Ahmed Qurei (better known as Abu Ala), the Palestinian prime minister and a figure closely involved in the secret negotiations which led to the Oslo peace agreement with Israel in 1993

Mahmoud Abbas (Abu Mazen), another moderate who has frequently negotiated with the Israelis

Nabil Shaath, a former businessman and now foreign minister

Yasser Abed-Rabbo, formerly a member of one of the left-wing factions, now a senior PLO official.

Mahmoud Abbas has frequently negotiated with the Israelis

In the second category are "insiders", younger men who remained in the Israeli-occupied territories when the PLO was in exile.

They have stronger roots than the "Tunisians", and they acquired their first taste of local leadership during the first intifada, or uprising against Israeli rule, which broke out in the late 1980s.


They include:

Mohammed Dahlan, the former security chief in Gaza

Jibril Rajoub, formerly his counterpart in the West Bank.

Profile: Jibril Rajoub

Both men have fallen in and out of favour with Mr Arafat, but are still influential and have considerable experience of dealing with the Israelis. Both are considered pragmatists.

Nabil Shaath is the Palestinian foreign minister

Another local leader who has come to prominence during the current intifada is Marwan Barghouti. He was the head of Mr Arafat's political organisation, Fatah, in the West Bank.

Many believe him to be the most popular Palestinian politician after Mr Arafat.

Mr Barghouti is currently in an Israeli jail serving five consecutive life sentences.

He was a strong backer of the Oslo peace accords and opposed attacks on Israeli civilians inside israel. after the start of the current intifada in 2000, he became more militant.

He now backs Mr Sharon's Gaza disengagement plan, describing it as a great achievement of the intifada.
 
#8
I wonder whether Yasser's stomach pains vomiting and near death symptoms have anything to do Mossad arranging for him to have a late night delivery of a "large donner, everything on" from the kebab shop down the road and adding some special garlic sauce of their own:roll: :twisted:
 
#9
How very strange

Sharon all of a sudden sees the light and says "We're out of Gaza" and Arafat is taken ill , so preventing him setting his gob on proceedings.

I look forward to certain Israeli Ministers asking for "Extra Chili Salad" as well :twisted:
 
#11
What good news a muslim terrorist leader (the fact he is a palestinian is a bonus) is about to croak.

I'll get the champers on ice ready to celebrate.
 
E

error_unknown

Guest
#12
Well as long a Sharon can keep the right wing under control, it seems with arafat off to sit with virgins in paradise (sic), there might be light at the end of the tunnel after all. Perhaps they've finally realised the Israelis are there for good and no amount of little scrotes throwing stones and suicide bombers will make the Israelis give up.
 
#13
Good riddance to the thieving old hypocrite. He'd already creamed off an estimated 500m quid from the UN and EU funds supposed to be used for the benefit of his people. His wife lives in a luxury apartment in Paris!

I could never take him seriously over the issue of Israel "stealing" Palestinian land after he and his Fatah thugs tried to overthrow Hussein of Jordan in 1970 and do exactly the same.

Still, he DID do for designer stubble and checkered tea-towels what Henry Ford managed for black automobiles. :lol:
 
#14
PartTimePongo said:
How very strange

Sharon all of a sudden sees the light and says "We're out of Gaza" and Arafat is taken ill , so preventing him setting his gob on proceedings.

I look forward to certain Israeli Ministers asking for "Extra Chili Salad" as well :twisted:
PTP,

Was thinking the same thing. Co-incidence :?:

lets hope that once the once the b*st*rd dies some of the moderates can come from out of his shadow and sort out the mess that he created.

Notice that his wife has come back from her long shopping trip in Paris (3 years so far)! she must be making sure she has all the right swiss bank account numbers.
 
#15
The problem will come when he dies and Arafat's wish is to be buried in Jerusalem.
However, there is a solution to this problem, if the bloke was taken out by a thorough missile strike there would not be enough of him to be buried and hence solve that particular problem.
He may indeed leave a power vacuum, but he is hardly in control of anything and has not been for years e.g. Gaza strip his power base was always more internally threatened.
 
#16
I'd put money on the IDF dusting off its contigency plans for a major strike into Gaza if Hamas and similar terrorist scum make a bid for power when the old basta*d finally pops his flip-flops. 8)
 
#17
claymore said:
I'd put money on the IDF dusting off its contigency plans for a major strike into Gaza if Hamas and similar terrorist scum make a bid for power when the old basta*d finally pops his flip-flops. 8)
The IDF will be paying many return visits in the foreseeable years to come regardless of Arafat, disenagagement plans, etc.
It is and will be the most active front for the IDF (rather like Lebanon 1980/90s)
 
#18
Rumor is he finally bought it...ONE CAN ONLY HOPE, the single noteworthy accomplishment of Arafat was making picnic blanket chic to wear on your head 8O
 
#20
As of this moment he is still alive on life support. When they pull the plug you can bet the infighting will begin to see who takes over the PA. The passing of Arafat will not mean peace is at hand but may accelerate the conflict. I cant see Israel having any choice but to takeover the PA controlled areas otherwise they will have a death of 1000 cuts.
 
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