Arado Ar 196A-3 1/72 by Airfix with Eduard photoetched detail set

The RN used the Seafox and the Walrus, and I think the Walrus served to the end of the war.
The Andrew also operated the Supermarine Sea Otter, very similar to the Walrus except it had a forward facing engine instead of a pusher and the cockpit glass bigger to give better visibility.
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the major decals fitted.
main decals applied.png

just the fine decals to go on, including some float markings.
final small decals.png

some minor touch ups...
main decals applied a.png

some small underside pe still to fit, the pitot tube, bomb racks ect
last of the pe to go on.png

and to finish off the TAGs gun
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when that work list has been signed off I might grab my goggles & sheepskin coat and have a stooge around Trondheim, see if I can catch a fleeting glimpse of HMS Belfast between the rain squalls.
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The left hand boat closest to the depot ship, any idea what those spaces are on the two flanks facing aft?
Apologies for the thread drift.

I thought it was stern tubes, but off-set at an angle? They are!

It is a T (for Triton class) boat. Rather than reproduce the entire Wiki page, here's the bit about weapons:

It was expected from British work on ASDIC that other nations would develop something similar for submarine detection. In the face of expected enemy anti-submarine measures any attack would probably have to be made at long range without the aid of the periscope, using only ASDIC. To counter the resulting inaccuracy, a large salvo of at least eight torpedoes would be needed.[20] British operational planning at the time also assumed that international treaties would prevent unrestricted submarine warfare, and the main purpose of the submarine would be to attack enemy warships. In such a situation, a commander may have only one chance to attack, so a large salvo was essential. The ten-torpedo salvo of the pre-war T-class boats was the largest ever fitted to any operational submarine.[21][22]

All T-class submarines had six internal 21-inch (533 mm) torpedo tubes in the bow. These were fitted with bow shutters on early Group One boats in an attempt at reducing underwater drag; however, the benefits proved to be rather minimal, and the shutters were prone to jamming from flotsam, and the idea was dropped in favour of reshaping the torpedo tube orifices for minimal drag.[21] After the loss of Thetis due to the unintentional opening of the rear door of a torpedo tube while its bow cap was open, a special safety clip known as the "Thetis clip" was introduced to prevent the rear torpedo tube door from being opened by more than a fraction if the bow cap was not in place.[21] Each T-class boat carried six reload torpedoes in the torpedo stowage compartment for the internal tubes. The reloading process was manual, although a power loading system was experimented with on Triumph in 1939 based on one developed on Grampus. This system proved underpowered, and the pressures of wartime production led to development being curtailed.[23]

The internal torpedo tubes were complemented by four external ("E-type") 21-inch torpedo tubes on Group One T-class boats, all forward-facing. External tubes were used in order to avoid compromising the structural integrity of the pressure hull with too many openings. These tubes could not be reloaded from within the submarine, and it was also not possible to conduct maintenance on or withdraw the torpedo once it was loaded into the external tube. These tubes were angled downwards at a 5° bow angle to ease operations, except on the lead boat Triton. Two of these external tubes were located in the bow, and another two located amidships at the base of the conning tower.[23] Unlike the internal tubes, the bow caps for the external tubes had to be worked manually, requiring a considerable amount of effort. The tubes also proved to be vulnerable to damage.[24] Two of the T-class boats had their bow external tubes omitted during reconstruction: Thunderbolt (ex-Thetis) and Triumph.[7]

Prior to the outbreak of war, there had been much debate over the introduction of stern torpedo tubes on British submarines. The effectiveness of a two-torpedo stern salvo was considered to be doubtful, and these tubes would take up valuable space on the submarine.[8] However, combat experience soon led to complaints from British submarine commanders like Commander Miers (Torbay) about the lack of stern torpedo tubes. Thus, eight of the Group One boats (Taku, Thunderbolt, Tigris, Torbay, Tribune, Trident, Truant, and Tuna) were retrofitted with an eleventh external torpedo tube facing rearwards, and this became standard on the Group Two boats onwards.[8] On Group Two boats, the amidships torpedo tubes were also moved aft of the conning tower and reoriented towards the rear. Initially these were angled at 10° off the centerline, but this created an area of flat casing that made maintaining depth difficult. Thus, for the last two Group Two boats (Traveller and Trooper) and all of the Group Three boats, the angle was reduced to 7°.[9]

The primary torpedo used by the T-class submarines was the 21-inch Mark VIII torpedo, principally the Mark VIII** variant. This torpedo weighed 1,566 kg (3,452 lb) with a 365 kg (805 lb) Torpex warhead and used a Brotherhood burner-cycle engine for a range of 4,570 m (5,000 yd) at 45.5 knots (84.3 km/h; 52.4 mph) or 6,400 m (7,000 yd) at 41 knots (76 km/h; 47 mph). It had a greater propulsive efficiency than any other contemporary torpedo of a similar size, but shortages of the Mark VIII early in the war led to some submarines using the older Mark IV.[25] The Mark VIII was primarily fitted with a contact pistol, which detonated the torpedo upon impact. A non-contact magnetic pistol known as the CCR (Compensated Coil Rod) was also developed and used during the war. However, like the magnetic pistols developed by many other countries, the CCR gave endless problems and was eventually withdrawn.[25] Due to development problems with British postwar torpedoes, the Mark VIII would remain the standard torpedo used by the T class (and all Royal Navy submarines) until 1971 with the introduction of the Mark 23 wire-guided torpedo.[26]

Back to the Arado - sorry all - no more!
 
that's all the items on the above snagging list done, including the Eduard Crew harness seat belts. Just two things to complete on the model, that plastic new fitted tube on the side of the forward fuselage, until I know is is a Gun? is it a coolant tube, petrol pipe? Then the antenna from fin to forward canopy upright, I'll make that from stretched uhu glue. Then only base and glass case, gotta keep the dust off. Whistles while twiddling thumbs till the GB start date on the 16th.
two final points.jpg
 
The Andrew also operated the Supermarine Sea Otter, very similar to the Walrus except it had a forward facing engine instead of a pusher and the cockpit glass bigger to give better visibility.View attachment 629529View attachment 629530
Final evolution was the Seagull but was not built as Helicopters took over their role.

F7541749-5FA4-4971-927A-38AF8BDD7B8F.jpeg

Shame as it looked pretty handy with a Griffon engine with contra-rotating props. It could fly from 35 to 214 mph and was initially to be fitted with a 4 gun turret.
It is available in 1/72 but not 1/48 as far as I can see.

ETA I’ve realised that the above needs to be added to the list of FAA aircraft that I need to build as it wasn’t included in the list I downloaded from t’internet.
That also goes for it’s earlier namesake (available in 1/48) which was developed from the Supermarine Seal and then developed into the Walrus.
 
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Final evolution was the Seagull but was not built as Helicopters took over their role.

View attachment 629879
Shame as it looked pretty handy with a Griffon engine with contra-rotating props. It could fly from 35 to 214 mph and was initially to be fitted with a 4 gun turret.
It is available in 1/72 but not 1/48 as far as I can see.

ETA I’ve realised that the above needs to be added to the list of FAA aircraft that I need to build as it wasn’t included in the list I downloaded from t’internet.
That also goes for it’s earlier namesake (available in 1/48) which was developed from the Supermarine Seal and then developed into the Walrus.
I posted the Seagull on Most beautiful Aircraft couple of years ago, cracking looking flying boat along with the Supermarine Jet Fighter flying boat.
 

Stan_Deesey

War Hero
The Andrew also operated the Supermarine Sea Otter, very similar to the Walrus except it had a forward facing engine instead of a pusher and the cockpit glass bigger to give better visibility.View attachment 629529View attachment 629530

It´s cleaner looking than the Walrus. I had heard of it, and had assumed it was the replacement for the Walrus post-war, but I had a read about it last night, and Sea Otters were actually flying before the war, but there was no production capacity to make them until 1942, (Supermarine had other priorities). As a result Supermarine didn´t start building them until 1942, and they didn´t come into service until late 1944. They served on until the 1950s.
They were also able to carry out dive-bombing, so were probably the last combat biplanes to come into service with a Western nation.
 
that's all the items on the above snagging list done, including the Eduard Crew harness seat belts. Just two things to complete on the model, that plastic new fitted tube on the side of the forward fuselage, until I know is is a Gun? is it a coolant tube, petrol pipe? Then the antenna from fin to forward canopy upright, I'll make that from stretched uhu glue. Then only base and glass case, gotta keep the dust off. Whistles while twiddling thumbs till the GB start date on the 16th.
View attachment 629762
Notwithstanding your undoubted talent, the frame on the sliding canopy?
 
It´s cleaner looking than the Walrus. I had heard of it, and had assumed it was the replacement for the Walrus post-war, but I had a read about it last night, and Sea Otters were actually flying before the war, but there was no production capacity to make them until 1942, (Supermarine had other priorities). As a result Supermarine didn´t start building them until 1942, and they didn´t come into service until late 1944. They served on until the 1950s.
They were also able to carry out dive-bombing, so were probably the last combat biplanes to come into service with a Western nation.
Definitely a what could been!
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Chef

LE
I posted the Seagull on Most beautiful Aircraft couple of years ago, cracking looking flying boat along with the Supermarine Jet Fighter flying boat.
Wasn't that Saunders Roe? As in your picture in your next post.
471CF249-33ED-4851-8379-6953E85AD1A1.jpeg
 
That’s the only problem with a flying boat, need a decent draft to keep the engines out of the muck.
It worked though and was a better proposition than the Convair Sea Dart.
 
the model itself is now done, the aerial is fine, so fine you can just see it, made from stretched UHU glue. The pipe is now matt black, a gun barrel apparently,
Also added a pe cockpit sliding rail on the combing. so just the base and glass case to make now.
finished model a.png
 
the model itself is now done, the aerial is fine, so fine you can just see it, made from stretched UHU glue. The pipe is now matt black, a gun barrel apparently,
Also added a pe cockpit sliding rail on the combing. so just the base and glass case to make now.
View attachment 630256
excellent work, as always.
If you put that onto a sheet of dark material, one would never know it wasn't a real aircraft.

Oh - 'coaming'
 

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