Anyone use Linux?

Nemesis44UK

LE
Book Reviewer
Preferably Mint distro?

I'm having trouble installing Linux games and just wondered if there was anyone with knowledge of Linux?
 
I use Linux Mint as a backup OS, but that doesn't mean that I know my way around it.
It's a very geeky OS.

No doubt there will be someone along in a minute who is fluent in all that command line bollocks.
 
Have you installed play on linux yet?
 

two_of_seven

Old-Salt
I have not used mint for a while, but there was previousely four types, Debian latest, Debian "supported" & ubuntu latest & Ubuntu "supported" do you know which you have ?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
I believe you want WINE, the Windows emulator for Linux. I had Linux forced upon me as a security measure prior to retirement. I never really got into the guts of Linux, and WINE was banned, partly to force us away from using Windows, and besides, our ThinkPads came with a Windows licence anyway and we ran Windows on top of Linux if we had to. Which meant a single program that Poughkeepsie couldn't/wouldn't convert to Linux, used to ship deliverable packages to Software at Boulder.

Don't quote me, I am a mainframe dinosaur, forcibly retired and trying to forget all that nonsense.
 
I'm of the opinion that the best thing one can do to even stand a remote chance of understanding Linux is to - grow a beard. It helps to also stuff some stationary in your top chest pocket and wear sandals (with socks).

Echo "do you want to grow a beard? (Yes/no)"
Read -p $1
If ["s $1"] == "yes" ]
Then
Sleep 5s
Echo ""
 

hotel_california

LE
Book Reviewer
I believe you want WINE, the Windows emulator for Linux. I had Linux forced upon me as a security measure prior to retirement. I never really got into the guts of Linux, and WINE was banned, partly to force us away from using Windows, and besides, our ThinkPads came with a Windows licence anyway and we ran Windows on top of Linux if we had to. Which meant a single program that Poughkeepsie couldn't/wouldn't convert to Linux, used to ship deliverable packages to Software at Boulder.

Don't quote me, I am a mainframe dinosaur, forcibly retired and trying to forget all that nonsense.
Ah hum. Wine Is Not an Emulator. ;)
This is probably what tou need:
Cedega Download Linux
 
I dipped my toes in the Linux waters many moons ago.

Had a spare laptop. Wiped the hard drive. Bought a kosher boxed Copy of Red Hat.

Tried to load it. It told me I had to mount the drives and disks. WTF does that mean? After five hours of tinkering I gave up, installed Windows and Office and chucked Red Hat in the bin.
 
All this talk about different versions of Linux and what A has to go with what B to achieve X reminds me of the big "move to open systems/Unix is the future" scam movement of the early nineties.

Get rid of your Neolithic mainframes (paging @AlienFTM ) and their ancient operating systems and move to the brave new world of cheap open systems, full interoperability blah blah, blah.

So what happened?

Companies just went to their hardware vendor (who they sort of trusted) and ended up with one or more of:
  • DEC ULTRIX
  • IBM AIX
  • Sun Solaris
  • HP-UX
  • Tandem NonStop-UX
  • SCO Unix
That's just a few off the top of my head. There were loads more.

So they basically bought into another proprietary OS. Way to go IT industry.
 
All this talk about different versions of Linux and what A has to go with what B to achieve X reminds me of the big "move to open systems/Unix is the future" scam movement of the early nineties.

Get rid of your Neolithic mainframes (paging @AlienFTM ) and their ancient operating systems and move to the brave new world of cheap open systems, full interoperability blah blah, blah.

So what happened?

Companies just went to their hardware vendor (who they sort of trusted) and ended up with one or more of:
  • DEC ULTRIX
  • IBM AIX
  • Sun Solaris
  • HP-UX
  • Tandem NonStop-UX
  • SCO Unix
That's just a few off the top of my head. There were loads more.

So they basically bought into another proprietary OS. Way to go IT industry.
IT Directors who have to have someone to blame/sue.

Leads to the following conversation in a trading bank:

IT Director: You can't use Linux, we don't allow Open Source

Draz: You use Samba on all the Solaris workstations on the trading floor.

ITD: We don't allow Open Source.

Draz: meh
 
I'd say a generic Linux isn't the best choice for games. By games, I mean the kind of thing that needs expensive graphics cards, lots of memory and an 11kV connection to the power grid, rather than minesweeper or Tetris.

There are specific implementations for games, e.g. Steam products.

Linux is ace, I use many different forms of it, from a pocket router to the network infrastructure in my house, but it's not a one-size-fits-all type of thing. I'd consider it more like a car brand. "I drive what is essentially a VW" could mean an electric car, a Golf, a minibus, a Kübelwagen, a convertible, an executive car (Audi), a luxury car (Bentley) or even a supercar (Lamborghini). Linux much the same on one plane. The basic commands in my pocket router with the processing power of a 1990s telephone are the same as IBM's Watson supercomputer. But there the similarity ends, and there are many levels in between.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
All this talk about different versions of Linux and what A has to go with what B to achieve X reminds me of the big "move to open systems/Unix is the future" scam movement of the early nineties.

Get rid of your Neolithic mainframes (paging @AlienFTM ) and their ancient operating systems and move to the brave new world of cheap open systems, full interoperability blah blah, blah.

So what happened?

Companies just went to their hardware vendor (who they sort of trusted) and ended up with one or more of:
  • DEC ULTRIX
  • IBM AIX
  • Sun Solaris
  • HP-UX
  • Tandem NonStop-UX
  • SCO Unix
That's just a few off the top of my head. There were loads more.

So they basically bought into another proprietary OS. Way to go IT industry.
As I served out my time after redundancies separation packages early retirements were announced, I was trusted to apply update packages to everything (except mainframes, we had a team of z/OS system programmers to keep them up to date. Or not, so we could test software on back-level systems).

I surprised myself how machines we had running different levels of different flavours of different operating systems. Far too many is the answer.
 
As I served out my time after redundancies separation packages early retirements were announced, I was trusted to apply update packages to everything (except mainframes, we had a team of z/OS system programmers to keep them up to date. Or not, so we could test software on back-level systems).

I surprised myself how machines we had running different levels of different flavours of different operating systems. Far too many is the answer.
I think it is the story of corporate IT systems. When the time comes to upgrade, save money by bolting on rather than starting from scratch. I guess you end up with something that nobody understands and probably ends up costing a lot more to keep creaking on.

Another common mistake seems to be adapting software written for an entirely different environment and application. Maybe that is not so common now.

All perceived as cost-saving measures, no doubt.
 
As I served out my time after redundancies separation packages early retirements were announced, I was trusted to apply update packages to everything (except mainframes, we had a team of z/OS system programmers to keep them up to date. Or not, so we could test software on back-level systems).

I surprised myself how machines we had running different levels of different flavours of different operating systems. Far too many is the answer.
Oddly enough there was a high degree of interoperability between those flavours of Unix, not that the hardware vendors could take any credit for it.

If you developed applications in something like FOCUS running against Oracle, Sybase, Informix etc you could normally move the code around between different OSs because the third party software vendors had done all the hard work in making the 4GL and the RDBMS work on that platform.

Supporting code on all those platforms cost a fortune but sometimes the HW vendors coughed up some cash to sugar the pill. The only real sticking point was the HW vendor not having a C compiler (but they all did as far as I can recall).
 

Latest Threads

Top